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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 8, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 8, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             no, of ,.-Ye.tock Moreh Fair tonight. .Saturday and Sun- day; somewhat colder extreme cast. HE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 277 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 191G Fat Stock Show to Begin On Saturday Highlight of Big Junior Show With Parade at Fairgrounds Sunday Afternoon; Entry List Ncan 600 At least 11 counties will bo represented in the Ninth An- nual Southeastern Oklahoma Junior Livestock Show, which starts Saturday morning and ends Tuesday at noon, so that exhibitors will have an opportunity to take their ex- hibits to shows at Arcimore or Tulr.a. Show Manager i Soys Briton Indulging In Right of Free Speech; Knows of No Big Three Meeting Soon WASHINGTON, March Truman declined to express his views today on Win- ston Churchill's proposal for a ,C'J Tn Round-Up virtual ml itary club will assist in this showing alliance to the peace At 3 Th" President told hi'ii news The annual event is to be high- lighted by a parade of livestock in front of the grandstands at the Fairgrounds Sunday at p.m. Truman Silent On Churchill Alliance Idea A New Island Is Born FIVE CENTS THE COPY County Agent fCy) Hailey is manager of the- Nin'th Annual Southeastern Oklahoma Junior Live-stock Show. He says that entries this year far exceeds those of previous vcars and announced that -T-H Club and FFA members from at least 11 countries will exhibit animals at the show here. p.m., ii wolf trapping demonstra tion will he given by tin expert trapper. 122 Steers Entered In the steer division, eight Shorthorns over 000 pounds have been entered, seven Shorthorns under arc entered; 25 Here- fords over 900; 45 Herefords un- der nOO aro entered; 10 Angus over !IOO and 15 Angus under 900 pounds. The total number of ani- mals entered in this class is 122. Lambs entered in their division include 21 Southdowns, 20 Shrop- shires and 10 Hampshires for a total of 51 head. Plenty of Swine In the barrow division, 92 Po- land China, 153 Duroc Jerseys, 53 Hampshires, fll Chester Whites and 40 Berkshircs for a total of 40fi head. The grand total entered through Friday morning was 5711 Ponfofoc, Garvin Counties Share New Road Program OKLAHOMA CITY. March 8. State Highway En Cinerr H. K. Bailey announced a supplemental farm-to murkct firtu" of 60 (Continued on Pago 2 Column 5) Cold Due to Ease Up Saturday After Second Cold Night Temperatures in Ada droppcu from 72 degrees Thursday after- noon to 30 degrees during the night, accompanied by a gale from the north which in late ev- ening blew a cloud of dust over the county. Friday was clear, however, but president told his news conference that the former Brit- ish prime? minister was indulging in the right of free speech at Ful- ton, Mo., Tuesday, when Church- ill proposed joint use of British and bases, combined training programs and extension of the U. S. Canadian defense agreement to the other British commonwealths. Mr. Truman said Mr. Churchill was a guejt in this country, and that if he himself decided to go to Great Britain to make a speech, he would feel just as free to express his own personal told the ready for sub- mission to the Public Roads Ad- ministration. The _neu- projects bring tc: J5.314.C.7 tiie entire amount for farm-to-markct projects this year. Three Additional projects have been submitted to the Public Hoads Administration to supple- ment the primary road program. A project railing for expendi- ture of S'UMIOO for construction of the Rock Cn-i 1; bridge on Davis Avenue on SH 7 in Sulphur was added to the program. Two projects on SH 18 were added to the 1947 program. One is :n Carter and Murray counties calling for expenditure of for grading and drainage, begin- ning one-fourth mile north of the Murray lino nnd ex- tending southwest'for 337 miles. The other calls for a bridge over Kemp Creek in Carter county. 6.1 miles north of US 70 at an estimated cost of S3G.500. The farm-to-market supple- mental pronrarn ready for sub- mission to PHA includes: miles and drainage from Sll GI. soutli- eait of Vanoss, cast to SH 12 of Ada. S28.R30; also 4 milrs of padinr. drainage and gravel from point 3 miles west of south edlte of Roff, north 1 mile, west 1 mile, north 1 mile and west 1 mile to county line. SH 25 miles west of Pauls Valley, thence west -5 gravel, drainage and gravel. also from point of SH 23 7': miles south of Pauls thence south 3.5 milrs drainage and gravel, 63. remained cold. According to the Associated Press, warmer weather will move into Oklahoma tomorrow nfter -another night of freezing temper- atures over the state, the federal weather bureau predicted today. Some Snow In State Snow flurries accompanied the hard freeze in the northern sec- tion of the state last night. The weather bureau said chances of further moisture were slim. High winds carried the light snow as far south as Oklahoma The stale weather bureau nt Oklahoma City nnd the regional bin-ran at Kansas City, which supplies the state-wide forecast had difficulty getting together on what Oklahomans can expect in- the way of weather during the next 24 hours. The Oklahoma City office issu- ed a forecast of possible 20 to 24 degree readings in the northwest- ern nnd northeastern parts of the state overnight, with 28 to 32 de- grees in the southeast and south- west. 21 Decrees At Guymnn Low readings in the state over- night included Oklahoma City Guymon 21; Klk City 20- Ard- nore 32; Ponca City 30; Wewoka JO; McAlester 34; Tulsa 34; Pauls Valley 31; Lawton 31; Cherokee and Ada 30. Precipitation was light. Tulsa lad .03 inches, Guymon .02, Way- ioka .01. and Elk City, Gage Ponca City, Bartlesville and other points reporting a truce. views. The president also newsmen: Combined Staffs Still Function 1. That tiic combined Anglo- American chiefs of staff will con- tinue to function until the war emergency has been declared at in end. Whether it will continue to function afterwards, he said, is i matter that will', be handled when the war emergency is over. 2. He knows of no plans in the mmediate future for another 'Big Three" meeting. 3. That General George C. Marshall, special ambassador to -hma, will return to the United States soon for consultations vith him; the former chief of staff then will return to Chung- king as special envoy. Winant Back To Report 4. That John Winant, ambassa- dor to London, is back in the United States to make a report. He couldn't say whether Winant would continue at the London post until he has talked with them. he hopes .to visit the UNO council meeting in New York late this month to welcome the delegates, if he can arrange his schedule to do so The president laughingly dis- missed a reporter's question as to whether James F. Byrnes, secre- tary of state, was considering re- tiring. He said he saw such a re- port in print while he was visit- ing Fulton this week. from the bottom of the ocean push upward Tclcphoto by Tom IMPSn.N NOT Itr.NNlXO Okla.. March n. I'm..burg County Slate Hop. Hiram Irnpson has announ- ced he will not be a candidate for re-election to the house this year. He said John L. Rogers, attorney, would make the race to .succeed KANSAS CITY. Has. March Xivic. I'lttsburch, former world welterweight champion, will meet Levi South- all, Kansas City, in a scheduled 10-round fight at Memorial Hall here March Promoter Freddie So.Timers announced today. Federal Council Hits Jim Crowism Protestant Negro Leaders Hoil Policy Rejecting Segregation Pattern By JOHN FIlYE COLUMBUS, O., March rotestant negro leaders .todav hailed the special meeting of the post-war policy le federal council of Southall Armr.troni: a protect- of Henry Iw EAT HER! Oklahoma K.iir tonight, Sat- urday nnd Sunday; rotm-what colder extreme nut t-old v. c; t tonight; lowest 25- west, near 30 ast, warmer 30 Saturday and Sunday. FORECAST FOR MARCH 8-12 Kanrar. Oklahoma nnd temperature ivar- mrr Saturdav. mltlcr Nebraska and Kan'.v: Sundav and Oklaho- ma and Mi- miri Mnmlav: v.-ar- Jf.rr again and will a-.rrage slicr.tlv below normal Nc-iiraska and near to above normal Okla- homa. Kansas and Mirsouri: :ight mowers Sunday and Monday. Churches of Christ in America for having taken "a long step forward in race relations" in its stand against Jim Crowism. The meeting, which closed yes- terday afternoon after a worship service led by the negro educator Or. Benjamin May, president of MorrlmiiNf College, Atlanta, and vice president of the council, in- cluded in it.-f work adoption of n long statement rejecting "the pattern of segregation." 1'he 500 delegates representing different protestant faiths were asked to work against en- forced segregation of races, not only in their churches but in their communities. The Rev. A. Wayinnn Ward pastor of the Hethel African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church of Chicago, commented that the council action represented prog- ress toward brotherhood among the races, as well as "a concrete program to take back to the churches." It ".-as Dr. Ward who told n section meeting considering the first draft of the council's anti- segregation declaration that this "would not mean a stampede of negroes into your churches." "It's the freedom a man feels that he said to them. Five Clergymen Assail Council UnAmericon, Say Colum- bus Group of FCCCA Criti- cism of Atomic Bombings COLUMBUS, O., March 8, OP) Columbus clergymen last night described the federal coun- cil of churches of Christ in Ameri- ca as "unAmcrican" and asscrt- its press releases constituted profound disrespect to our okiier and sailor daad." The five, criticizing a council committee report which deplored the atomic bombing of Hlroshi-ma and Nagasaki as "morally indc- added: "This unAmerican council docs not speak for us." The ministers, who said they were members of the American council of Christian churches de- clared in a press statement: "The press releases of the fed- eral council constitute no less than profound disrespect to our soldi- er and sailor dead, and they a- mount to open insult to the thousands of patriotic young men who fought for the preservation of our liberties." Signers of the statement, writ- en yesterday on the last day of the three day. meeting of the federal Council here, were- Reverends C. C. Clawson of the Memorial Baptist church- H C. Stigers of Bible Presbyterian church; Ernest Finkenbinger of Central Baptist church; William h. Ashbrook of Calvary Bible church; Theodore B. Hax of Emmanuel Lutheran church. The clergymen were particul- arly critical of a report on atomic warfare drawn up by a council commission which deplored the "morally indefensible'1 atomic bombings of Hiroshima nnd Nag- asaki. Churchill Makes Impassioned Plea To Stand Together RICHMOND. Va.. March Churchill, caution- ing that peace cannot be preserv- ed by casting aside "the panoply or wartime called upon Britons and Americans today to stand together "in defense of those causes which we hold dear. In an applause-punctuated ad- dress to a joint session of Virgin- ia's legislature, B r i t a i n' s war time premier departed from his prepared address to pay special tribute to General Dwight Eisen- hower for his work in welding the allied troops into a force which fought "as soldiers of a single Cation." He did not mention, directly his recent appeal for an Anglo-Amer- ican military alliance. But he drew n sustained burst when ho crjcd out. e should stand together. We should stand together In malice to none, in greed for no- thing but defense of those causes we hold dear." Emphasizes Unity Nor did he mention either com- munism or Russia, main theme o his address only four days ago in Fulton, Mo. Instead, again and again, he emphasized the close working unity of British nnd American troops in tlm war just ended, tin tenacity of the British in the first years of the war, the power ol tiie American "arsenal for the friends of freedom." And he cried out as he ended: Above all, among the English- speaking peoples, there must be the union of hearts based upon conviction nnd common ideals said Churchill, "is what Confident Russians To Stay With UNO Truman Organization Won'r Be Allowed fo Col- lapse; Red Note on Iran Awaited WASHINGTON, March Truman vigorously asserted at his news conference today that the United Nations or- ganization would not be allowed to collapse, and expressed confi- I offer. "That is what I seek." Eisenhower Praises Churchill As he ended, peering over his spectacles to note the reaction, Virginia's lawmakers packed in the little house chamber and the thronged gallery rose to their feet and applauded. The crowd then began to chant lor General Eisenhower to speak. The general, smiling said "I could not come on a happier oc- casion than as one of the aides of one of the great men of the man whose conception of politics, industry and military affairs led him to be the inspira- tion for the North African cam- paign." "Of all the things that support- ed me in the years of the war none other was so inspiring as the courage and indomitable sup- port of the prime minister of Great Britain." dence that Soviet Russia will go along with the organization's work. The president's comment was prompted by questions about what might happen if Russia de- :lijics to comply with the United States request for the immediate Withdrawal of Soviet troops from situation, Mr. Truman said, will be handled when it -omcs up. A reporter then suggested that a Russian refusal might mean a collapse of the world peace agency. Iran. That Red Cross Drive Still Is Lagging Passes With County Goal The 1948 Red Cross Fund Cam- paign slipped past the mark during the past twenty- four hours, the total rising to 147.72. The figure was slowly mount- ng toward the goal of >ut Red Cross officials renewed lieir plea for more exhaustive The success of the ampaign to fill budget needs of he Pontotoc county Chapter will lepend on contacting every po- ential contributor, they dcclar- d. Sheriff's Force Goes A-Raiding Reports Finding of Whis- key In Two Raids Members of the sheriff's force made two raids for whiskey Wednesday afternoon and both times they got results. Thurman "Cowboy" Hice was found with 41 pints of tax paid liquor in his possession. Charges have beta filed and he has been released on a bond. County Attorney Vol Craw- ford said that it was a third and subsequent offense against Hice. Three nnd a half pints of tax paid liquor was found in the pos- icssion of Annie Blocker. Char- ges were also filed against her. Her bond was set at HI- GERMAN BREAD RATION CUT UNO Won't Collapse The president disagreed strongly, asserting that the UNO would not be allowed to collapse. "Even if Russia went down a one-way a reporter asked. The president replied he did not believe Russia was going down a one-way street. Official Washington anxiously awaited Moscow's reply to this country's request for immediate withdrawal of Russian troops from Iran. Nikplai V. Novikov, charge de'- affaires of the Russian embassy, made his first diplomatic call in months on Secretary of State Byrnes yesterday. Officials said later, however, that he did not discuss either of the two United States notes sent to Moscow Tuesday. Can't "Remain Indifferent" It was believed likely that the state department would make public the second of those notes sometime today. It concerns re- ported Soviet withdrawals of in- dustrial equipment from Man- nitiria and proposals for Soviet- Chinese operation of Manchurian industries. Declaring that the United States "cannot remain indiffer- ;nt to Russia's decision to keep roops in Iran, the note released ast night said the Soviet action was contrary to: The Roosevelt-Stalin-Churchill declaration in Teheran Dec. 1 1943, in which the three gov- ernments pledged "maintenance or the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iran.'" The British-Russian-Iranian treaty of January 29, 1942, which pledged withdrawal of all for- eign troops from Iran by six months after the end of the war 2. Get Supplies For School Elections Mitchell Notifying School Boards Supplies Available For March 26 Voto Saturday Final Day For Registration, Filing lor Office Saturday brings an end to two developments tied up with the Ada city primary election of 1 0 President Names Fact Board In Rail Union Wage Dispute Automatically Defers For 30 to 60 Days Walk-Out Brotherhoods of Engineers, Trainmen Had Scheduled N. WASHINGTON, March President Truman, named a three-man fact-finding board today in the dispute threatening a nationwide railroad strike. He appointed former Associate Justice Leif Erickson of the Montana supreme court, Frank M. Swackcr, New York lawyer, and Gordon S. Watkins, of the economics department of the University of California, to inquire into the grcvanccs of two railroad brotherhoods. New Move In Rail Unions Heads Unworried, Say "Communist Flavor" In New Rank and File Talk CLEVELAND, March leads of two railroad brother- loods, who expect appointment >f a presidential fact-f i n d i n g board will defer a strike schcd- ilcd for next Monday, said todnv here was n "communist flavor'1 bout a new "rank and file" novement loods. within the brother- President A. F. Whitney of the Brotherhood of Railroad Train- men and Elvanley Johnston, head f the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, declared the move- nent "nothing to worry about." Formation of the Nation a lank nnd File Association wa nnounccd at a press conferenc ist night by Wellington Hoc, a vriter who was under contrac :ir if he is not available, can b.u left with the 'County clerk at the courthouse. Then the matter of registration Is important. Many have moved to Ada in the last year or two ind lack only registration to qualify for voting here. And then there are numerous ox-service men who went away >efore they were 21 nnd have re- urncd 21 nnd over and need only o register to he ready to take heir voting part as citizens. After this w.-ek the political situation will involve industrious campaigninji by the candidates, pushing of a campaign for favor- able vote for a proposal for a board of freeholders to study the city charter for revision or amendment, nnd. in a few days, preparation of the county elec- tion board and then the precinct election boards for the election itself. The city run-off election comes in early April. "I suspect his (Roe's) statemen' Is tremendously inflated and that the Hank and File will pay but little Whitney com- mented. "This movement no March is the date sot for the annual school elections. Norman C. Mitchell, county superintendent, is getting word to clerks and school officials over the county that supplies and legal forms a.-e in his office and can be obtained there. Saturday he expects a ..u .I num- ber of officials to call by and Lt. Col. McGugin Dies In Hospital Former Congressman Best Known as Counsel in Jackson Barnctt Case COFFEYVILLE, Kas., March Lt. Col. Harold McGu- gin, 52, died last night in th army and navy hospital at Ho Springs, Ark., where he had been under treatment for a year. Me Gugin served two terms in con cress aS a representative from Kansas. McCJiigin, former state repre sentative and congressman fron the third district, was born Nov 22, 11193. on a farm near Liberty Kas., of Scotch-Irish parents. He probably was best known as counsel in the muddled finan cial affairs of Jackson Barnett one of the nation's wealthiest In dians, and sponsoring the success ful fight in against the states anti-cigarette law. He was an unsuccessful republican can- didate for the governorship in 103H, being defeated in the pri- mary by Payne Ratner. Mlin was a (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Dairy Meeting Of Unusual Interest On Monday Night A dairy meeting will be held Monday night at o'clock in the Aldridge hotel and will be of interest to all persons who have dairy cattle, according to C. H. Hailey. county agent. In 1944, a farm youth program was started in Pontotoc county. There are now 65 farm boys with registered dairy heifers. This pro- gram is working with good res- ults throughout the county, ac- cording to reports made to county farm leaders. Glen Householder, extension both World War I and II. .serving in France as a .second lieutenant United States zone will be cut per cent April 1 but the reduction will be made up by new allot- ments of peas, beans and other legumes. In Brazil boa constrictors are sometimes kept around the house as pcta to kill rodents. WASHINGTON, March Mi- President Truman leaves today for another weekend on the Pot- omac river aboard his Presiden- tial yacht, the USS Williams- burg. Read the Ada News Want Ads. from 1917 to 1919, and as a lieu- tenant-colonel in command of a m 11 11 a r y government unit at Iroyes, France. He contracted a liver ailment at the latter place and was re- turned to Winter General hospit- al. Topeka, by plane in January, Hi- was admitted to the Okla- homa bar in 1914 and Kansas bar in 1915. and practiced law at Cof- fevville. After World War I married Nell Bird, Nowata, Okla Feb. 27. 1D21. They have no chil- dren. WASHINGTON, March II. wrote "finis" lociay to tlii' si-arch for five torpedo bombers which disappeared with 14 crewmen off the Florida coast last Dec. 5. The search was dis- continued, the navy said, only af- ter planes and ships had scoured square miles of sea and land. director of the Holstein-Friesinn Association of America, will be the principal speaker. He will discuss selection, breeding nnd feeding of dairy cattle. Raymond Appleman, ficldman of the Holstein Association in the southwest, will also speak on breed organization. Lloyd Stinnett, extension ser- vice dairyman from Stillwatcr will discuss artificial enscmina- tion. Grand champion exhibitors at the Southeastern Oklahoma Jun- ior Livestock Show will be awarded medals at the meeting. A luncheon will be served at this meeting through the courtesy of the Ada Kiwanis club. The naming of the board auto- matically under custom will de- fer for 30 to CO days a progressive walk-out which the Brotherhoods of Locotomotive Engineers and Railroad Trainmen had scheduled to start Monday. Mr. Truman announced the ap- pointment of the board at a news conference. Says Many Disputes Settled He took the occasion also to note that wage questions in rubber and telephone industries had been settled, strictly on col- lective bargaining bssis and in a manner satisfactory to both sides. This, Mr. Truman commented, was done without any ballyhoo. Furthermore. the president said, there have been hundreds of such settlements which have received no notice, settlements by the CIO, AFL. and indepen- dent unions. Mr. Truman remarked it waa too Rad that the people who do the right thing can't get as much publicity as those who constant- ly run to the newspapers for Not Intervening In CM Strike Answering n question, the president said flatly he would not intervene in the General Motors strike, as suggested br Detroit city officials. In reply to another question, he said he always had been of the opinion a settlement should be reached on the basis of a 13- Vi -'cents an hour wage increase proposed by a fact-finding board. Mr. Truman reaffirmed a White House announcement that the cents an settlement for basic steel did not necessarily set the pattern for the entire industry. He said that the 18V4 cents ap- plied only to basic steel and assumed that their settlements would be worked out through negotiations. A number of fabricators al- ways have followed basic steel. Mr. Truman said, and there is no reason why they need not do so again. Others have not followed steel, he added, and there Is no reason either why' they should not follow their own course. Oil Company Gives Grant For Research Defective Powder Is To Be Burned WASHINGTON. March 8. The army announced today it will burn pounds o: defective smokeless powders as the cheapest and safest wcy of disposing of it. Tin' could war find assets corporation no buyers for the powder, the war department said. One million pounds will be burn- ed March in open fields nt he Sunflower Ordnance plant, Lawrence. Kas., nnd similar fires will be set later at other instal- ations. Of pounds of smokeless powder manufactured luring the war, only the 100 pounds was found unuaeable, he department said. Oklahoma Wins YOKOHAMA, March Villuim Brow, a lightweight of .ast Mass., outslugged ommy Illorker, Camden, Ark., o win the decision in the main vent of the Eighth army's i-eeltly boxing card last night. Other results (three round louts) included: Tommy A b b i 11. Oklahoma ity, decisioned Ernest Huling, Detroit, Head the Ada News Want Ads. Oklahoma A. and M. experiment station by the Anderson-Pritch- nrd Oil Corporation of Oklahoma -ay. for insect control research. been announced by Director W. L. Blizzard of the experiment tation. The grant, to be used over a wo-year period, will provide for esearch in use of certain special ills, by-products of petroleum rc- ining, in preparation of insecti- ides. The work will be conduct- .ty w- Teller, graduate f the University of Maryland in 942, under the direction of Dr. F. A. Fcnton. head of the depart- ment of entomology at Oklahoma A. and M. DDT, Pyrethrum, nnd other in- sect control materials will used m the research work. Fen- ton stated. The experimental pre- parations will be tested on flies. mosquitoes, clothes moths, and other common insects. Teller is a war veteran, having been discharged recently after several years service with the U. S. army and navy. He was in malaria control work with both branches of the service, and served in the Philippines for 19 months. THr PESSIMIST Or nob niinki. It. Th1 walkout that really gits things in a jam is when its time f cat an1 mama urn t t' be found. If we had t' choose a fcr a girl these days we don't believe any would be more appropriate than Hope.   

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