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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 7, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Increasing cloudiness this after- noon, becoming cloudy tonight, clearing Friday. 42nd No. 27fi THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Entries Still Coming in On Slock Show More Than 500 Animals Expected for Ninth Annual Show, Starting Saturday A few entries from scattered localities are still being received by County Agent C. H. Hailey. manager of the Ninth Annual Southeastern Oklahoma Junior Livestock Show, who is complet- ing plans for the big show where more than 500 entries are ex- pected. "Because the Ada Chambc- of Commerce realizes the impor- tant part which agriculture plays in the existence of Oklahoma, we are happy to nfforcl the 4-H and FFA boys and girls of Southeast- ern Oklahoma this opportunity of exhibiting in the Ninth Annual Southeastern Oklahoma Junior Livestock Elmer Kcnison, secretary, said Thursday morn- ing. Judjrin? Contests Too Paul G. Adams, Stilhvater. will m charge of a 4-H judging contest. Each county may enter one team of throe boys. All ex- hibitors are eligible to compete for individual prizes. Team members who are not ex- hibitors can compete only for team prizes. Teams must be reg- istered with the superintendents before the start of the contest at 8 a.m. Tuesday, Mait-h 1U. No member of the team is eligible to compete in this contest who has participated in the non-collegiate contests at Chicago or Denver or who has been a regularly cnroll- e student in college. John Farrar of Stillwatrr will ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1946 br superintendent of the FFA judging ronu-.st. Tlic same rule-: govern FFA judging as does 4-11 judging. Prize Money Set Up First prize money for each o three steer classes will be ien dollars will be paid the win ner of the first place lamb in eacl division. First prize winner in rach barrow division wiil receive The grand champion steer in 3945 was shown by John Brother of Atoka. He was an FFA mem- ber and thc animal was u Here- ford.' A Duroc barrow owned by Ross English of Garvin county won Crand champion honors in "1945. Ralph Thompson of Hughes county exhibited a Southdown lamb that won grand champion honors last year. For the past five years a Hughes county 4-H club exhibited the grand champion lamb. A total of more than will be given to FFA and 4-H club members as prizes this year. Premium money was given by the Ada Chamber of Commerce and Pontotoc county cattlemen. Phone Settlement Boost for Wages Means About For Southwestern Workers ST. LOUIS. March 7, tlement of the threatened strike of telephone workers means wage :ncrcascs totaling approximately S15.000.000 for members of the Southwestern Telephone- Workers union. D. L. McCowon, union Chicks Into Hands Of Farm Youths Five Thousand of Them Distributed; C. of C. Poul- try Program Praised Five? thousand' chicks chirped greetings today to n hundred farm club youths who will re- ceive the premium hatch from the Ada Chamber of Commerce in its third annual poultry pro- gram. The luncheon program and dis- pensing of chicks was preceded by two hours of instruction in poultry brooding and rearing, led by Don Brooks, of Oklahoma A. and M. college, and Cy Hailey, ijontotoc county agent, in the dis- trict court room. Brooks, speaking before mem- bers of the Chamber of Com- merce and farm youth, termed the C. of C. poultry program as ''outstanding over the state." In fact, he added, some other civic organizations over the state have modeled similar poultry experi- ments after the one started here three years ago. The poultry husbandry special- ist pointed particularly to two features of the program: "Taking them (farm youth) into a busi- ness and giving the young poultrymen the necessary "know-how." He said that Floyd's Hatchery breeding farm is the largest such breeding enterprise for poultry m Oklahoma, and furthermore, it has the best egg production records for the breeds Floyd's is developing. Brooks declared. The speaker noted that the poultry industry grew to n two one-half billion dollar jn- iustry during the war, and said hat more farms include poultry than any other type of County Farmer's Daughter Makes History .r... FIVE CENTS THE COPY Government Intervention Averts Telephone Strike WAC Sgt. Connie Grayson, ,23-year-old daughter of an Ada Okla larmer, fixes the Bull College standard to the college boat short'lv rlvcp Cam at Cambridge? England" in the Cambridge Lent Bump races. A member of the Ai States servicemen attendin merican nding Cam- cemen aenng Cam- bridge university, Connie made rowing history by being the f to competl; in thc State Ma igrlcullure. He advised that the big tenant 'arm population would be better atisficd and more prosperous if landlords would provide ade- quate poultry housing and equip- ment for successful poultry pro- duction. Neal J. Beasley Odum, of W. A. presented a t J'l ...Tl.il poultry demonstration, advising the selection of good chicks, and cautioning that thc most costly part of a poultry program is chick mortality. Steel Strike Isn't Long as 500 of Fabricating Plants Still Are Tied Up By JAMES MARLOW WASHINGTON. March you think thc stool strike is over? It isn't. That moans something to you About CIO stcclworkers-of the struck for higher pay in are on strike. Red Cross Drive Lags, Speed-Up Now Being Urged Although reported donations in the 104G Cross Fund Cam Mign have risen to Red Cross officials in the county plead today for a speed-up in the work- Silver Star Award Made Posthumously To Glen Norrell They are striking against about ers' efforts. By Thursday morning there .'ere still only two completed blocks in the downtown business ection, and several rcsidcntia' canvassers finished their calls hort of their quotas, to stir up a ittle apprehension at Ked Cross icadquarters. president, estimated today. McCown said that, in brief, the agreement provides the following weekly pay increases for the 30 000 members of the STWU. Craft groups, minimum anc SB maximum: traffic operating group, to clerical group to miscellaneous group (care takers, mechanics, guards, build service men. etc.) S5: specia emplovis (accountants, assistant? special to In addition, he said, it provi- des for the reduction of tho time period to reach top wages mini- mums for 11 to 8 years: reduction in the number of wages schedules and rrrlassificatinn of certain ex- rhangf-s into higher ware brac- kets. Word of the settlement came too late to prevent pieket- :ne of exchanges and brief cur- tailment of long distance and manual scrfice here. By 8 a. m however, all service was report- ed back to normal. Southwestern union officers rr.anagi-d to notify ki-v cities in Kansas. Oklahoma, Tex- as and Arkansas of the strike cancellation before ;crious cur- tailment of long distance service. They predicted restoration of normal throughout the area by noon. Red Cross county officers urg- d that the volunteers accelerate he campaign while thc weather is favorable. It appeared today that the pro- gress of the 1946 campaign may remain uncertain until the mid- dle of next week. Headquarters expects some reports from coun- ty school districts on Saturday which may indicate thc extent of success outside Ada. In Ada there have been several incomplete reports from down- town workers that have swelled the total but have confused only appraisal of progress. awarded posthumously the Sil- ver Star for exceptional bravery in the _ battle of the Bannholz Woods m Germany, thc War De- partment has notified his par- Mrs- Paul v- Nor- e, 506 Monroe. Stillwater. Calm, Accurate The citation reads: "For gallantry in action in Germany. On 10 February 1945 wriniK attack on Bannholz Woods, Germany, Private Nor- rell s platoon was attacked from the flank by two enemy tanks which appeared from around the edge of the woods. Calmly and accurately firing his bazooka under point blank fire from the enemy tank fiuns, he scored three hits on one tank, and two on the other, disabling the first and damaging the second. "In loading the sixth round he was severely wounded by shrap- nel, but his fire forced the tank lo retreat from the woods, to a 1Un Private Nor- rell rallied and was attempting to lire another round when he was mortally wounded by an cxplod- ng shell.. His conspicuous brav- ery and gallantry under enemy ire are in keeping with thc high- traditions of the United States Army." Greater return.': for amount in- News Ails jw EAT HER! J Okl.-ihuma Inerrasinn cloud- :ne.v efore' going into service as a chaplain. Just before receiving his dis- he returned from 14 nonths overseas service as rcgi- nental chaplain for the In- antry Regiment, a part of the 00th Inf. Division; this division vas with the Seventh Army and the Seventh Army record >.v being in direct contact with They things Was In 9Uh Division Private Norrell was a mcm- >er of the 376th Infantry, 34th a mcm- 500 fabricating plants. make the finished stool you buy, like nuts, bolts, pins. The longer the one guesses when it will longer you'll have to wait for some of the things you wanted. The workers struck against the Industry, specifical- ly against 80 fabric plants, the mill.! which make steel, and 788 fabricators. The strike with the 80 basic plants and 288 fabricators is finished, the strike against the remaining 500 fabricators isn't Why U. S. Steel Fight The U. S. Steel corporation is the biggest basic outfit of all That's why the fight with U. S. Steel was the one you read most about. President Truman suggested !he company, which is the wcath- ervane for the other basic plants, give a pay raise of 18 Yi cents an hour. But U. S. Steel wouldn't give that raise unless it got a good increase on the price of steel it made and sold. The government finally surrendered. It allowed U. S. Steel and the rest of the 80 basic steelmakers to charge an average of more a ton for their steel. Satisfied with this, they agreed I5ov.c. thoir workers an increase or 18 Yi cents an hour. Their strike was over. Meanwhile, 288 fabricators al- Rail Strike Delay Seen Truman to Name Emer- gency Fact-Finding Panel To Study Workers Wage Dispute CLEVELAND, March Postponement of a scheduled strike by Brotherhoods of Rail- road Trainmen and Locomotive Engineers appeared likely today as it was announced in Washing- ton President Truman would name an emergency fact-findin panel to study the workers' wag dispute. Appointment of such a pane in accordance with provisions o the Railway Labor Act, presum ably would delay actual walkou 30 to CO days. Had Set Deadline President A. F. Whitney of th Brotherhood of Railroad Train men and Alvanley Johnson, heat of the Brotherhood of Locomo live Engineers, announced yes terday a deadline of G a.m. iiex Monday for a professive striki against 384 railroads and termin uls. Pending official notification o the panel's appointment, John- ston said only: "I am a law abiding citizen and personally would not favor embarrassing the president." Whitney said a conference be- tween officials of the two broth- erhoods would be held to con- sider further action in event of presidential intervention. Under the strike plan service would halt on 112 railroads Mon- day. tin Tuesday, 91 Wednes- day and 90 Thursday. Baird Findings Not Final Labor observers noted the Railway Labor Act empowers the National (railway) Mediation board to recommend to the pres- ident appointment of an emer- gency fact-finding board, which in 30 to 60 days would make rec- ommendations. However the board's findings would not be The history of the 94th Divi- the battle on and states that the German tanks had bazooka skirts." or extra armor which made thc bazooka rockets less effective. This ac- counts for tho unusually large number of casualties in this en- gagement. rcsidcnt of Ada until after his graduation from school and was attending Oklahoma A. and M. when he entered service. MacArthur Urges Mail Speed-Up Wonts Thot Airmail Car- ried, After Finding Letters Taking Weeks to Arrive lie ncmy ays. ti-etcr holds the Bronze Star ward, KTO Ribbon with two stars, the American Dc- fi'nse Ribbon and the Victory Medal. J He will assume his new duties by preaching Sunday. March 10, at iniirning and evening services at I'ickelt. ST. LOUIS. March 7. Marty Marion, "Mr. Shortstop" of the St. Louis Cardinals, ended his holdout and signed his 1946 contract today. Marion signed after a brief eral Mac-Arthur is gravely con- cerned about a collapse in airmail leryice that has resulted in letters akmg as long as 37 days to roach Japan from California, a hcad- quarters spokesman said today. for 147 consecutive After a week of nn mail letters were distributed at headquarters lati- today. Some were postmark- ed Jan. 30. Although bearing air mail stamps, they presumably came by ship. But many ships make the trip in two weeks Tin- mail situation "has a matter of grave concern since the middle of January when trans- 1 aciiie air service was reduced to dnv pilcl> t" Tokyo and the thc spokesman "General MacArthur has pro- posed to the war department that all air mail be carried even t lough this might mean the prac- Some Fabricators Hold Back The gave various reasons: They couldn't afford it. Theirs was a highly competitive industry, they needed price relief to make up for higher wages. Within a few days OPA is ex- pected to allow some fabricators to charge higher prices for their product to make up for the high- er prices they have to pay the basic steelmakers. But this isn't a blanket in- crease to all fabricators. OPA will give them relief a group at a time, according to the type of product they turn out. takes time. And this OPA increase nothing to do with any increase in wages the fabricators give It's only price relief for the increas- ed priors they have to pay. All Takes Time getting this kind of P.r'Vc, find they need still higher prices to make up for higher wages, they'll have to come back to the government and ask for that help. That, too. takes time and will have to be handled by groups, nil nt ....__ This has iTWLtlU tJUk UU binding and the act does not spo- ci cally bar a strike during thc period of the board's activity. The strike call was termed "a senseless and flagrant disregard of the Railway Labor Act" by the Carriers Conference Committee, in Chicago. The committee rep- resents major railroads now en- gaged m arbitration of wage de- mands from IB other rail unions. More On Way to Sfafe ,-1 7'" Pint Uully breezes which might nip some early greenery in the north- western part of the state were on tho way to Oklahoma todav. The federal forecast calls for a high south wind today, which will change into tho north dur- ing the night with the mercury dropping to around 30 in the northwest tonight. Generally fair skies, with the colder weather reaching into the south and east is seen for Fri- day. Guymon. with 38, was thc states coolest spot overnight. BEGGS IS VFW SPEAKER OKLAHOMA CITY. March 7 Lyall T. Beggs, Madison, Wis., national judge advocate of tho Veterans of Foreign Wars, will be prmcinal speaker at a state rally of VFW members here Sun- day. Attendance is expected to total Not Aiming Just at Russia U. S. Emphasis on Blunt Talk New Method; State Department Has Many Concerns By ALEX SINGLETON WASHINGTON. March 7.-W) country's newly-stressed emphasis on blunt talk in world affairs has some American diplo- matic officials worried lest the policy appear aimed exclusively at Russia. Acknowledging their concern privately today, these officials made a point of noting that the sting of frank words has been felt in diametrically opposite tnat is, in Spain and Argentina, as well as in the Soviet Union. Just Plain Dealings The whole idea, they say, is based on the hope that a straight- from-thc-shoulder approach will succeed in forcing a quick yet friendly showdown where tradi- tional hush-hush diplomacy might add to suspicion. These officials, who must re- mam unnamed, said critics of American foreign policy should remember that American notes protesting Russia's plans in Man- thurin and Iran were preceded first by an indictment of Argen- :me action during the war and jy n three-power denunciation of Franco's Spanish government for collaboration with the axis. Await Iran Note Reaction Meanwhile, the state depart- ment: 1. Await Russian reaction to its Agreement Reached On Wage 'Pattern1 Agreement Too Late to Prevent Walkouts. Picket In Many Places; Conciliation Officials Kept Pressure On By WILLIAM NEEDHAM WASHINGTON, March interven- tion averted today's threatened nationwide telephone strike just 25 minutes before the 6 a. m. (EST) deadline. Seventeen hours of unremitting pressure by United States conciliation service officials led to agreement on "pat- tern" wage increases ranging from to weekly. (Continued on Pago 2 Column 1) Von PapenloTry To Prove He Was 42 Peace Seeker By NOLAND NORGAARD NUERNBERG. March Von P a p e n. one time rouble shooting diplomat for Hitler, informed the inter- ational military tribunal today e would try to prove that he ought to initiate peace overtures n 1042 with George Earle, U S aval attache in Turkey and a former governor of Pennsylvania. Through his attorney. Von Pa- pen also sought to prove that he made similar overtures to a Cath- ?nf., at the Vatican in 194.! and to King Gustaf V of Sweden in 1939 and 1940. tribunal will begin hearing the defense case tomorrow, start- ing with Hermann Goering. Hitler's former vice chancel- lor, whose bungled sabotage of- J9rts in the United States in the first World War first brought him to world notice, said he hoped to show his role in trying to end the war through questions submitted to Kurt Frciherr Von Lersner described as the president of the Orient league in Turkey. The monarch's testimony was sought, the tribunal was told to show that Defendant Von Papen asked him in 1934 to tell Adolf Hitler ci the dangers in the nazi anti-semitic policy and begged lim in 1939 and 1940 to intervene to keep peace in Europe. Through his attorney, Von Pa- Strike Was Brief Here Picket Line Set Up, Service Halted Until Word Con- firmed Settlement Reached For the second time in the his- tory of Ada, local citizens saw picket lines formed. Although the telephone strike was settled before picketing actually started thc word was not passed around fast enough and the local union that is affiliated with the Nation- al Federation of Telephone Work- ers started picketing thc local telephone office at 6 a. m. continued until official notification was received by local union leaders from area headquarters at Norman. 65 Went Out Here Some-65 local telephne work- ers went out on strike leaving their switchboards. Nothing was changed when they left and any conversation that was in progress at the time the strike started was not stopped. Those affectqd included switch board operators, maintenance men installers, commercial employees and construction men. O. D. Simonds, city general chairman of thc union, had em- ployees back on thc job at a. m. a few minutes after he was notified that thc strike had been settled. "Strike called agreement pic- kets as soon as may now return to work." was the contents of the official mes- sage received from Mabel Clan- ton, general chairman of Oklaho- ma. Emergency Calls Handled Switchboards were operated for emergency purposes only by sup- ervisors who arc not members of the union. Pickets took their turn at all entrances to the local office. An Ada News reporter was given permission to pass the picket pen suggested that the king be Questioned "in a manner which he tribunal deems suitable Sir David Maxwell Syfe said the pro- secution had no objection n..; lines but did not get into thc telephone office. "We just don't want you up was the an- swer made to his request to en- ter the building. One woman who has been with the local office 19 years received ?r27 Pcr week for hcr services. Under the new agreement, she will probably receive per week as switchboard operators were granted a to per week 1 The agreement came too late, however, to prevent walkouts m several cities, and picket lines were thrown up in Washington. Philadelphia and at several points m Ohio and Michigan. Baltimore operators struck last night but began to return to work shortly after 7 a.m. The wage "pattern" was set in a contract between the American Telephone and Telegraph com- Eany and the Federation of Lone ines Telephone Workers signed at a.m. Others Follow, Cancel Strike On the basis of the long lines the executive board of the National Federation of Tel- ephone Workers, five minutes Inter ordered cancellation of tho strike called by tho long lines un- ion and 18 other NFTW affiliates. Thirty-four others had been ex- pected by thc union to observe picket lines. Local union officials, finally informed of the cancellation, im- mediately issued orders recalling the pickets who had taken up their posts in several cities, but varym delays were anticipated Dclorc telephone service return- ed to complete normalcy. Although thc long-lines wage agreement reportedly was reach- ed before midnight last night. Jo- seph A. Bcirne. NFTW president, was unable to issue the strike cancellation until many hours la- ter because of the necessity for polling local unions by long-dist- ance telephone. Just Ahead Of Deadline Finally, 25 minutes ahead of the strike deadline. Beirne was able to telegraph each of the 51 member unions of the NFTW the final word. His telegram said an agreement m respect to wages for affili- ates has been reached" and that the member unions which had with the Ameri- can Telephone and Telegraph company were "in general, in agreement with the settlement." lieirne s telegram was based on a wage pattern established by an agreement between the JlMri tltn r _ raise. UouldVt Pass Picket Lines Employees with union affilia- tions reported for work as usual Thursday morning, but would not break through formed picket To? nhC of Telephone Workers. The pattern provides for some in pore than long lines employes. 
                            

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