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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 6, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Generally fair this afternoon, to- night and Thursday; colder to- night. 42nd No. 273 Constitution For Japan Is Announced Leaves Hirohifo Only Sym- bol, With No Power; Abol- ishes War as Nation's Right THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS By IlKINKS TOKYO. March (i, new Japanese constitution renouncing war for all time and prohibiting the maintenance of armed forces was announced today. General MacArthur. rcnorting tnat it Wiis drafted with his full approval, emphasized that "the foremost of its provisions that abolishing war as a sovereign right of the nation renders (Japans) future security a n d very survival subject to'the good faith and justice of the peace loving poodles of the world." Hirohito. who will he reduced from 'a sacred and inviolable" 'rr.pcror to a symbol or state with vcrv limited formal functions, is- sued a special rescript stating- "It.is rr.v desire that the c'on- s.itution of our empire be revis- ed drastically upon tile basis of the general will of the people and the principle of respect for ft t L _ tr.e fundamental human rights. "I comm hereby the compe- tent authorities of my govern- ment to put forth in conformity with rny their best efforts Ada Crowded Before, But Was Different During Oil Boom Houses Filled; Now Too Many Have Just Couple Using House It isn't news to most people in Ada to hear that there is an acute housing shortage. Nearly every man. woman and child can tell you the name of some family who is looking desperately for a house, an apartment or just any- thing to keep the rain off and the cold out. Every day there are from three to a dozen people in the News Office to read over the list of vacant just to see ii there is a list. If there is a place listed, the twelve have the same opportun- ity to get there, but often they all arrive at the address to find that someone knew about the place before it was advertised and has already been renlcd. I here is much discussion about the reason for the local shortage and upon investigation it was found that there are several rea- sons. About 12 years ago when the t itts Pool was discovered and Ada a boom, we were able Yes. Truman Asks For Support Of Churches Assails Interests 'Greedy For Says Religious Revival Would Solve Problems By ERNEST B. VACCARO COLUMBUS, Ohio, March 8 Truman today laid the door of "certain interests." it to care for the overflow. some houses and shacks were toward end." accomplishment of this (MacArthur's approval of the constitution, maintaining the as a symbol of state, pre- sumably ends any possibility o his being arrested as a wa crirr.es suspect, i _ Sovereignty In People i he proposed constitution vests sovereignty in the people and s.nps all governmental powers from the emperor. It replaces the powerful house of peers with house of coun- cillors who must be elected by all of the people and who may be overnden by the house of rep- resentatives on rome major is- sue.. It enumerates a long list of revolutionary individual rights for the Japanese. It renounces "war as re built at that time, but not nearly enough to house the thousands who arrived over night Different Then But m those days conditions dlffcnt- frclgn right of the nation and the threat or use cf force as a means cf settling disntitcs." Wataru Xarahashi, chief secre- tary, told a press conference the constitution "is one of the dras- tic steps the government must take' and In- "hopes it will be a bloodless revolution." Milton Eisenhower Declines UNO Post Kansan Offered Place As Assistant Secretary General TOPEKA. March ton S. Eisenhower has declined tr.e post of assistant secretary- general of the United Nations or- ganization, it was learned here todav from friends the Kan- ras -State college president. The- post was first offered to Eisenhower rotr.e weeks ago when the l.'NO was in session in ixmdon. At that time an ans- wer was required within 24 hours. President Kisenhowe ported to have rent a an had the spell of prosperity we recently enjoyed and both the residents of Ada with spare bed- rooms and the people who came to work in the oil fields and to (Continued on Page 10, Column 3) ------------f------------ February Report Reveals Need For Red Cross Funds Red Cross works at home as ell as abroad, and February's report from the executive secre- tary of Pontotoc county's Red Cross chapter presents a typical month s activities during tire ear- V post-war period, according to The February report follows: During the month of February he Red Cross chapter made 58 urlough verifications for service- ni-n where there was emergency iced for furlough or extension. ive invesli-iiiions for field direc- ors regarding home conditions mancial assistance was given to six servicemen's families, which amounted to Ex-service cases handled for the month of ri-fruary w ere 2B, nnd of this number eight received total fin- assistance to the amount of 5.III...1. and cases were claims. Since the Red Cross has been geared nationally to meet needs ex-servicemen and for the past two .lot been called on to meet the needs of civilians, but the report for February shows .vhich he described as "greedy for the responsibility for much of the opposition to his domestic legislative program. Appealing directly for church iupport of measures which have down in congress, the president told a special session of he federal council of churches of Christ in America: Urges Religious Fervor A truly relieious fervor among ur peopb would go a long way oward obtaining a national ealth program, a national hous- ng program, a national educa- ton program, and an extended and improved social security pro- gram." Speaking after a p a r a d through flag-draped, crowd-lin cd high street from his specie train to the Deshlcr Wallic hotel, the president called for rising standard" of home life He urged religious support als for the development of atomi energy under "a high moral code to rescue a "sick" world "in th< doorway to destruction." The president said that if peo pie 'really believed in the bro thernood of man, it would not be necessary to pass a fair employ ment practices act" to prevent ra cial discrimination in job-giving and added: Greed Behind Pressures If certain interests were not so greedy for gold there would be less pressure and lobbying to induce congress to allow the price control act to expire, or to keep down minimum wages, or to per- mit further concentration of ec- onomic power. "A truly rcligiou-. fervor among ADA, OKLAHOMA. WEDNESDAY, MARCH Cpew of U. S. S. Oklahoma City Entertained FIVE CENTS THE COPY answer b ho to u.ttj tnat there was an increase in this Kind of assistance to families Cases needing food, rent and clothing for civilians amounted to 5101.00 during the month. One case was a grant for fifty dollars when the home and all posses- sions had burned. Three other is re C'-ISPS bt'inR during the negative I "Tks, P7iod receipt -hi I a check from the denartmnnt ecause he could not see! i he could fulfill I welfare, the an. Kas.. before he would have to leave for New York, tem- porary UXO headquarters. The offer was renewed within li-.e past few days on the basis tnat it is highly desirable that an American occupy the post of as- sistant secretary-general for ad- ir.mistration. L'NO affairs for if.e United States are reported to nave insisted on the choice of Ei- renhower. hut Eisenhower is said .o have again declined solelv be- ulfill obligations ineso cases State college at with children who i" were eligible for -cccpted, he would have had to leave for New yet this week. IRISH POTATOES GOING SCHOOLS OKLAHOMA CITY, March G. Insh potatoes purchased -rorn farmers at support prices arc- being distributed to institu- tions and community school lunch- Leo W. Smith, assistant director of the U. S. department o. agriculture, production and rr.arKctmc; administration, said 3 V. Agricultural commodities pur- chased under support price pro- crarns Co to community scho-il child welfare cert- ers. charitable institutions a n d similar elicible groups. Other commodities distributed this vcar cabbage, carrots 'and green beans. Head the Ada News Want Ads. JWEATHER fair this a.t'-rnoon. tonight and Thursday- colder tonight and ir. east and south this afternoon- peratures tonight In warmer Thursday. tem- the 30's; re eligible for benefits from that agency. "There were 29 cases given on- ly consultation and guidance, and information where financial as- sistance was r.ot involved. 'Total cases handled for the month were 130, and the total pf exnense to chapter financial assistance and SJ8.00 cosl of communicalions." Edith J. Stuart, _____Executive Secretary. Kerr Asks Subsidy On Oil Be Kept WASHINGTON. March 6 Oovcrnor Robert S. Kerr has asKcd the Oklahoma congression- al delegation to help obtain con- tinuance of the federal subsidy payment on stripper oil produc- tion after June 30. "It is due to expire Kerr told n reporter, "and if it is not continued, the stripper wells win have to close down because they cannot afford to operate" Hep. Rizley (R-Okla.) said that i beltcr scheme is advanc- ed. I II go .-.long on the subsidy plan for oil." J Senator Moore (R-Okla.) and Hep. Schwabe how- ever, exnrrssed opposition to government subsidies while Rep Wickershan (D-Okla.) indicated he approved the governor's sug- gestion. h our people would go a long way toward obtaining a national health program, a national hous- ing program, and on extended and improved social security pro- gram." Hlffh Moral Code Needed The development of atomic en- ergy the president told the church leaders, has left mankind in the doorway to nr upon the threshold of the greatest age in and add- ed: Only a high moral code can master this new power of the uni- verse, and develop it for the com- mon good." Mr. Truman spoke at a special meeting of the federal council of the Churches of Christ in Amcr- ira after his arrival from Fulton, n introduced former "rlllsh .Prime Minister Winston Churchill for n foreign policy speech at Westminster college yesterday. He planned to fly back to Washington. He called upon the forces of decency and righteousness" to make full use of their war-torn freedom to save a world beset by 'threats of new conflicts, new terror and deslruclion." Saying forces of "selfishness and greed and intolerance" are again at work, Mr. Truman de- clared that they create situations demanding "moral and spiritua awakening in the life of the ind tcrtainmcnt was" staged on the S Explained Al Citizens Meeting At an open meeting Tuesday night the sentiment leading to a proposal for a board of freehold- ers, to be submitted at the March city primary, was explained. followed by questions and answ- ers and comment. Russell Smitb. chairman, rep- resenting a Better Government committee of citizens, first made it clear that those seeking revi- sion of the present city charter ore not condemning what has gone on in the past, but that em- phasis is on the system and not on individuals. Needed For Ada's Future Harold Norris explained that Ada, with expansion pressing in, s handicapped by some provi- ipns of the charter, that the or- dinance proposal is simply to ap- rove a later election of a board f freeholders, two persons from acn ward, to go uninstructed in- o study of city charters where fficirnt government is found and apply their findings to revising Freeholder Move Churchill Speech Injects New CwMl J A M mm m _ Disturbing Element Into Troubled Big Three Relations Plea for Military Alliance Brings Varied Reaction; Follows Byrnes' Stern Warning By ALEX II. SINGLETON WASHINGTON, March 6. A disturbing No Progress In Phone Strike Meet Conciliators Still Are Trying Hard Nationwide Telephone Strike Scheduled to Begin Thurs- day Morning at 6 O'clock; Wogo Negotiations Fruitless By WILLIAM NEEDHAIM WASHINGTON. March two-hour govern- ment conference today produced "no progress" toward avert- ing tomorrow's threatened nationwide telephone strike but conciliators arranged to renew their efforts promptly. Conciliator Edgar L. _ Rail Strike Set March 11 new W element beset suspicion-riddled Big Three relations today- Winston Churchill's plea for quick creation of an Anglo- American military alliance. Hero in the nation's capital two schools of diplomatic thought reacted to the impact of the Churchill address One held that it would bring hidden distrust out into the open and force a showdown; the other that it would bolster belief that security must entail spheres of influence. There appeared little sentiment to vising make it MARIETTA TO BUILD SCHOOL OKLAHOMA CITY. March G, way was cleared for a school building program by the city of Marietta today with the approval by the attorney general of two bond issues totaling S3 900 for land and building. approved includ- ed m funding bonds by Leflorc county school district No. Jt (Continued on Page 10, Column 5 China Presses For Russians fo Leave Russia Hasn't Specified 'Difficulties' Causing Delay in Manchuria By SPENCER MOOS A CHUNGKING, March Chinese government hai been pressing for withdrawal o Russian troops in Manchuria bu Soviet authorities intimated their delay was "due to certain diffi- culties which they didn't speci- fy, .Liu Chieh, vice minister of foreign affairs, said today. He did not elaborate. He also said China is keeping the United States informed on the course of Sino-Soviet nego- tiations. Liu skipped some queries with a laconic "no comment" at a press conference. Answers he did give showed that: Russia had not informed China of the movements and size of Soviet forces at Port Arthur made a joint Sino-Russian naval base under the Si no-Soviet treaty of last Aug. 14. Reports received by the Chi- nese government confirmed that Soviet authorities removed ma- chinery from industrial plants in Manchuria. Inability of the Chinese gov- ernment to restore Chinese so- vereignty in Manchuria was due in general to the failure of Rus- sian forces to withdraw from that vast territory, particularly from Changchun, the capital, and Mukden. Inability of the Chinese to as- sume control of civil administra- tion of Dairen, as provided in the Sino-Sovict treaty, was connect- ed with "the general question of Manchuria." The treaty declared Uaircn an open port. ie present charter ion? effective. Such recommendations would e submitted at a later election. present, he said, citizens are emg asked only to vote 'yes' on ie proposal to have a board of Why Revision Sought A number of those spoke- on various 'phases of the situation, all showing sincere in- terest in the welfare of Ada James Griffith gave an outline showing the background of dis- satisfaction among various citi- zens Icaelin" to the move to bring the charter up to date i 'o outlined conditions here in when the charter was adopt- ed by a town of with few paved streets and-a recently com- pleted water system that even with extension in is still far from adequate for a growing city- it callcd attention to lack of safe- guards for city money and city properties, to division of authori- ty among three commissioners making it difficult for them-to agree on needful courser of action, to the way duties of a commis- sioners have got out of balance, along with job appointments and spending of city funds, as condi- tions changed during the past 34 vr.-.irs- tn -'responsibility city's proper- Efficiency Is Goal The report urged revision to modernize the city government now, when Ada faces possible expansion, to provide safeguards for money and properties, for ef- ficiency that would mean getting more for money spent; for enabl- ing city government to act more readily and to make possible tnore rapid adjustment to chang- ing conditions and demands on citv government. The group agreed to push the matter vigorously to bring before the citizens of Ada the recom- nendation that a board of frce- lolders be elected to study and Fulton Wondering What to Do With All Those Hot Dogs By LARRY HAM, FULTON. Mo.. March International affairs, which for a day focused the nation's atten- tion on this tiny niidwesterii col- lege tmyn. faded into the hack- ground in Fulton today. The bii' question line was: "What are we going to do with all those hot Fulton's natives, who played host yesterday to Winston Churchill, President Truman and nearly other visitors, faced a prospective inenu of stale hot dog and hamburger sandwiches the rest of the week. Mayor Frank Ilensley said plans had been made to ta'ke care of up to persons lot of people brought their own lunches, Missouri-style, and the crowd wasn't ns big as expected! to discount the weight of Church- ill .1 words on American public opinion, coming as they did only five days after Secretary of State Byrnes told the world ibis coun- try must stand ready to fight, if necessary, to protect tin- prin- of the United Nations char- ter. Developments Come Fast On top of Byrnes' solemn words have piled these developments in recent weeks to .strengthen argu- ments in some! American diplo- matic' quarters that another fare- to fare meeting aiming the chiefs of gave newsmen that report as negotiations recessed until after- noon. Earlier, it had been an- nounced that "some progress" had been made at a session last- ing late into the night. Union On Air Tonight Seventeen unions affiliated with the National Federation of Telephone Workers have set the strike for 6 a. m. Thursday in each time zone. The union has arranged for a'nationwide broad- cast over the Columbia network at p. m., eastern standard time tonight. Wage negotiations between the American Telephone and Tele- graph company and the Federa- tion of Long Lines Telephone Workers, an NFTW affiliate, be- gan yesterday morning at the labor department and continued until 2 a. m. today. As the meeting broke up, to reconvene later in the morning Kdgar L. Warron, chief of the federal conciliation service told newsmen: No settlement had been reached, various formulas for settlement had been discussed and "I think we've made some progress." ennii1 essential to <'sti between years; to lack of responsibility for records of the city's proer- i ...i and people were on hand in this town of to see the former British prime minis- ter and tin? president. A half ton of hamburger and hot dogs and -15.000 buns were ordered to feed the throng, but only one downtown stand, op- erated by the- American War Dads reported a sell out. Fulton was dressed in carnival garb for its big day and colored streamers, a little bedraggled, hung across the streets to- still ubmit proposed amendments. revisions or OPA Withdraws 10 Of Us Injunctions OKLAHOMA CITY. March S. OPA Director John N. Barncil announced 10 to 1G njunctions filed against state levator companies were ordered withdrawn and at least two more in all probabilily" will be dis- Denco Lines Get New Trial Hearings Set for March 21; Object To Wayne-Ada Permit Granted OTC renew w.irtime of cooper- ation: 1. A United Stales protest sent to Moscow only yesterday against the failure of Russia to withdraw Red Army forces from Iran by the March 2 treaty deadline. A second note of protest bas- ?d on a Chinese report to lliis lovernment that the Soviet Un- on had claimed Japanese indus- tries in Manchuria as "war booty" and had proposed joint operation of much of the terri- tory's basie industry. Neither note was made public, but Ibis country has taken the stand that no such reparations settlement in Manchuria could be undertak- One Way At the same time Joseph A Beirnc. NFTW president, issued a slatemcnt declaring that "on the basis of develonments during the night. I can see no eleventh- hour than a satis- factory company can prevent the strike" Beirne said ho had ordered several local unions not to "jump the gun" before the strike dead- line and to give the company every opportunity to meet our requests before the dead- The results of the bargaining h< tween the A. T. ,t 'P. wage lin the en by Russia alone Russia and China. by only OKLAHOMA CITY, March G TrT corPoration commission will hold hearings March 21 on a motion by Denco Bus Lines trial on Permits granted last week. Denco received a permit to operate between Chickasha and Ada by wav of Purcell while the Oklahoma Transportation Co re- ceived permission to operate from Wayne to Ada. Denco objected to the permit "ranted the Okla- homa Trans-ortation Co The OPA last week asked fed- ral court orders closing down he clavators on the grounds they ad not supplied required scho- ules. Later Varncll conceded iformation on which many of he injunctions were filed was ncorrect, First orchestra leader to con- uct without using the baton was eorger J. Webb. He instituted is practice in Boston in J843. FORMER GOVERNOR DIES BROCKTON. Mass.. March 6. William H. Wills, former governor of Vermont and mem- ber of tin- federal communica- tions commission, collapsed and died early today in the Bryant hotel. Medical examiner Dr. Pierce H. Lcavitt said death was due to n heart attack. Wills, who was in Brockton for a tCC hearing was G3. He serv- ed as Vermont's wartime gover- nor. having been elected to his second term in Gr-'iter returns for amount In- News Classified Ads. Atomic Secrets Involved 3. Canada's disclosure and Russia's acknowledgement that Soviet agents in Canada obtained certain military socrets. Canada charged this was done by espion- age and that the secrets included data on atomic bombs. Moscow said Canadian citizens gave a So- viet ministry attache in Canada certain secret information which was not of .special interest to Russian authorities. 4. Published reports from Dai- ren that Russian troops were de- porting Japanese forces to Siber- ia for use in labor battalions. ft. A Soviet announcement that the Kuriles, strategic chain of is- lands across the entrance to the, sea of Okhotsk, and southern Sakhalin, have been incorporalcd mlp Russia on the strength of a Yalta agreement but without rat- ification by the United Nations Secretary of Agriculture Clinton P. Anderson's statement yesterday that the soybean crop in Manchuria essential to Un- peoples been "liberat- ed. Asked specifically as to whe- ther Russia was responsible, An- derson replied "not primarily." He added that it might have been one of the Chinese factions. Churchill spoke at Fulton, Mo., yesterday, ns private citizen. But the fact that he was intro- duced by President Truman lent acrhaps even more importance to his words than if they had been voiced on the floor of commons in Churchill's lole of leader of his iKijestv's government's loyal op- Hisition. It has been emphasized, how- ;ver, that Mr. Truman's appcar- mce on the same platform does not constitute an administration endorsement of Churchill's views, n some diplomatic quarters, it vas regarded rather as a devel- opment of United States policy insed on the belief that support houltl be given to the argument I-ong Lines federation, considered a key union in the NKTW set- up, remained obscure. What Services Affected This is what the national fed- eration says would happen, once the strike started: All lonR-dlstance telephone operations in the 4K states would cease; most non-illal local telephone service would be discontinued; operation of dial phones would depend on now well they could he kept in repair; some teletype .sys- tems would be affected; and overseas telephoning would end, The union savs emergency calls could be handled by supervisors who are not members of the fed- eration and therefore would be on the job. The federation's main negotia- tions for increased wages have been conducted with about a score of companies which are part of the Bell Telephone Sys- tem. The narent company is the American Telephone and Tele- graph company. Progressive Strike Would Tie Up Nation's Rail Sys- tem, Say Brotherhoods CLEVELAND. March Heads of two big railroad broth- erhoods. The Trainmen and En- gineers, today set 6 a.m. (EST) March 11 as the deadline for a progressive strike which would tie up the nation's rail system. The expected announcement was made at a press conference called jointly by President A. F. Whitney of the Trainmen's Bro- Iherhood, which has mem- bers, and Alvank-y Johnston, grand chief engineer of the Brotherhood of Locomotive En- gineers' 711.000 members. Truman Could Delay Walkout The actual walkout could delayed 30 to 00 days by the pres- ident's appointment of a fact- finding committee as provided by the Railway Labor Act. Such a committee would 30 clays in which to study the strike call and report recommen- dations for ,i .settlement. The [lanel's recommendations arc not bmtling on either party to the dispute. "Will Abide By Law" Johnston said at Washington last month, when he and Whitney called cm President Truman, that the probably would exhaust machinery set up by Railway Labor Act and cm anoth- er occasion declared that "what- ever provisions the law calls for we will abide by." In instructions which Whitney said were mailed to all members of the two brotherhoods, the Trainmen's president pointed out that employes on mail trains hava the same "rinht to refuse to per- form service" as those on other trains. "So far as your legal right to strike is tin- instruc- tions said, "there is no differenca between a mail train and any other train. You have identically the- same right to refuse to per- form service on a mail train al you have to refuse to service on any other train. al perform hat the time has come for plain peaking. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Baby Chicks fo Be Given Out Thursday C of C Meeting Centers In Distribution of Chicks To 4-H and FFA Members Chamber of Commerce mem- bers and guests will be treated to a free Dutch lunch Thursday at noon in the ballroom of the Al- dridge hotel where baby chicks will be given to 4-H Club and if A members as the Cham- ber of Commerce chicken pro- gram is continued. Don Brooks, poultry husband- ry department of Oklahoma A. and M. College, will be the prin- cipal speaker at the Chamber of Commerce meeting. FFA and 4-H members who are planning to receive chicks will attend a school conducted by Brooks in the district court room from until 12 noon. Rhode Island .Keds. White Rocks. White Wyandotte. White Leghorn and Barred Hock breeds of chicks will be distributed to boys and girls in Pontotoc coun- Some 100 boys and girls and their parents will attend the meeting where each person se- lected will receive 50 chicks for the purpose of raising a flock of "Men in road and yard service are to handle and transport troop trains, hospital trains and milk trains with the understanding that no other service is to be per- formed in connection therewith." Adan President Of Stale Baptist T. U. TULSA, Okla.. March John Roy Harris. Ada, was elec- ted president of the Oklahoma Baplist Training Union today at the group's first postwar conven- tion. Herbert Findley, Tulsa, was named vice president, and E. W. Westmoreland. Oklahoma City. was re-elected secretary. Read the Ada News Want Ada. TH' PESSIMIST Dob Dlankt. JT. chickens. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. anyway, we know wher she is nqw." remarked Mrs. Newt Lark, after 'or scventecn-year-ol1 daughter wuz buried. i About till only sign in th' average home after supper is th' radio.   

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