Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: March 5, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - March 5, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Now Chicago U. ,ice prcsijent sponk H.-. u. s. for atom.e .f Mostly cloudy with showers and thunder storms this afternoon, and tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 274 Hoover Will Go io Europe For Survey Former President to Check On Pood Needs at Request Of President Truman March President Herbert Hopvi-r today accepted an invi- tation by President Truman to KO tr> Kuropc to survey food needs of cnntincnt. Mr. Hoover's acceptance by Secretary of Agriculture Ander- son following a breakfast discus- sion of the food situation, attend- ed by the former chief executive. who carried out foreign relief programs in Europe after World War I. Anderson said Mr. Hoover will leave probably next week for the food survey which may require 30 days to complete. It will be his objective to learn at first hand the actual needs of war-torn areas. Anderson said Hoover hoped to contact many persons who aided him in the food relief program in Europe following the first world war. To Francr First The former president will take several persons with him. includ- ing Dr. F. It. Fitzgerald. food al- locations officer of the agricul- ture department. The others are to be named bv Hoover later. Anderson raid it was probable that Hoover would go to France first. The secretary of agriculture said the government. in .'.endinc Hoover abroad, sought to ascer- tain whether thvre ir. any "wat- er" in statements of food relief requirements submitted by the various countries asking U. S aid. The Hoover party plan.-, to fly to Europe. Sharc-Tood Campaign Hoover's first fol- lowed last White He use in' and" icans to .-.hare their food with the If-ss fortunate peoples of the world. At that conference Hoover to serve as honorary chairman of a famine emergency committee now being organized to carry on a campaign of dom- estic "belt-tightening" in the consumption of ly wheat products and fats and oils. Secretary Anderson also an- nounced that advisory com-nit- Ices of the food processing indus- tries, food distributors, whole- salers and retailers, as well as hotels and restaurants will meet him and other food offi- cials Thursday on wavs of savmc foods. Anderson raid the government hopes to announce late this week or early next a specific pattern of food consumption for indivi- duals, families, hotels and other public eating places. ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 1946 War Criminal's Scaffold Vets Lavish In Their Praise Of Red Cross Value Osage Cattlemen Convene June 21-22 PAWHUSK.V. March The tenth annual convention of the Osage County Cattlemen's Association, an event known throughout the southwest, has been scheduled for June 21 and President Gantner Drummond announced today. Held in the heart of a famous blucstem pastureland. thc meet- ing? featuring barbecue and a cowboys dance, attracts cattle- men from several surrounding s.atcs to hear experts on modern ranching methods. Drummond said a much larg- er attendance than ever before" was expected and finding suffi- cient accommodations was devel- oping into a problem. PRYOR. Okla.. March 5. -Wrs. John Shutt. 74, widow of a ..layes county pioneer said to have first cotton gin. will be buried tomor- row after services at the HaptHt church. It. S Sln.tt. a resident of P.-yor for 52 years, died Sun- da v. Red Cross Drive Is Rolling in Ada Now Workers Going Ahead Through Rain; Contributors Re- minded Need Is Great for Overseas, Veterans, Hospitals The first day of tho 194G Red Cross Fund campaign fin- in a drizzling rain, but headquarters counted volunteer workers combing tho city. As the Red Cross coffers slowly began to swell toward the goal, a total of was reported from the dis- trict, with but one block complet- ed, however t h e Oklahoma State Hank block. Its quota was met. One key worker in the res- idential section reported her block complete, and quota exce- eded. Women Braving Dismal Weather The women volunteers in the residential sections were faced with damp treks and muddy shoes in their house-to-house canvass today, but were report- ed to be braving the d i s m a 1 weather, anywav. Home tendency to belive that the Red Cross is this year to re- turn to the pre-war "roll call" campaigns, asking donations of one dollar per person, has brcn reported, but Red Cross emphasized today that ich is not the case. As a matter fact, the Red Cross chapter hole and others over the nation may be faced with trying to do more with less, they report. Currently the American Red Cross is maintaining 775 recrea- tional establishments in foreign countries where Yanks are serv- ing. The Red Cross has been askecl to double their staffs in government military hospitals, and to place hospital staffs in (WEATHER! Oklahoma Mostly cloudy with showers and thunder storms 1.-..S afternoon, and tonight and in fast Wednesday; locally heavy fast and central; colder this af- ternoon, colder tonight in cast and extreme south: low tempera- tures 32-37 northwest, to near in extreme southeast: some- ".vp.at warmer Wednesday in aorthwc.-t. FORECAST FOR MARCH 5-R ..Iissouri. Kansas. Oklahoma and in Ne- orafKa, Kansas, and Oklahoma Wednesday, remaining cool in Missouri: warming in Missouri n-.urfdpy; codling beginning in about Friday or Satur- day spreading over remaining of district Saturday night or Sun- div; .-attires will average 3-5 decrees above normal: mod- erate rain in Missouri Wednes- dav and over the district begin- 'The Red Cross did more good in the war than most of us rea- said Orion Pursley, former Army tech sergeant. "It was cer- tainly swell to know that, in case we should get an emergency leave, we could borrow expense money on just a few hours notice. And in overseas centers we could stop in for coffee and doughnuts and was a link to home." M. I... Hall, who spent several months with Army forces in Ger- many, liked the Red Cross club- mobiles, especially the recordings of American popular music -they kept on hand. "We appreciated U. band music over in Ger- the former sergeant said. In With Invasion Troops "On D-day plus two during one invasion in the Pacific, I sat on Beach Blue watching the Marines storm I was eating Red Cross doughnuts and drink- ing Red Cross coffee." said Ed Haraway. with thc Army's construction engineers. He add- ed that Red Cross units almost beat the Marines into invasion territory. Tom Grant. ex-Army Corps- man, said the Hed Cross was very active in the European Theatre of Operations. "They were always ready with coffee and when we came in from a mis- sion." "Wonderful" Says Ex-Marine 'I think the Red Cross is one of the most wonderful organiza- tions ever set was the com- ment of Irvin Leo Carter, ex-Ma- rine. He was especially enthusi- astic about the work done with prisoners of war. "1 guess Red Cross rations just about kept some of those fellows alive, and the organization did another val- uable service by keeping up con- tact between the and their families." Curtis Kennedy, formerly a ra- dio operator in the Army Air Corps, said: "It seemed to me that the Red Cross was the most important organization in Italy when I wan there, except maybe the Army. We depended on Red Cross stations for all our reading material and when we came back from a mission, a. elubmo- bile was always on hand with coffee and doughnuts." Got Him Emergency Leave The Red Cross is tops in mv books, said Glen Ferguson. "Our field director helped me to get two emergency leaves vhcn mv grandfather was at thc point o'f they managed to put one leave through in just two hours. "In India, at a place named Pun, the Red Cross has set up a rest camp for G.I.'s. where any Churchill In Call for U. S., British Pad Warns Against Russia's Desire for Expansion Of "Ift Power and Doctrines" By ERNEST B. VACCARO FULTON. Mo.. March a, Winston Churchill called today for a virtual Anglo-American military alliance with n blunt warning against what he termed Russia's desire for "indefinite ex- pansion" of its "power and doc- .rines." Asserting that "a shadow has alien upon the scenes so lately ighted by the allied the former British prime minister de- clared in an address prepared for lehvery at Westminster college lere: Russia Plans Unknown Nobody knows what Soviet Russia and its communist inter- national organization intends to do in the immediate future, or yhat are the limits, if any, to heir expansive and proselyting endencies." Britain's wartime leader grave- ly declared that prevention of another great war "can only be amoved by reaching now, in HHfi, a good understanding on all points with Russia under the general authority of the United Nations organization." While he said he does not be- lieve that the Soviet union de- sires war. Churchill attributed to the Russians n desire for "the fruits of war and the indefinite expansion of their power and doctrines." Reds Admire Strength 'From what I have seen of our Russian friends and allies dur- ing the war, I am convinced that there is nothing they admire so much as strength, and there Is nothing for which they have less respect than for military weak- ness, said the veteran states- man. He th thi FIVE CENTS THE COPVT Franco Tells U.S. He Has No Intention Of Quitting Russians Hurry Uninvited Foreign Newsmen Out of Bar the Door By RICHARD CUSIIINO TIENTSIN, March 5. Russians, frozen by surprise at veterans hospitals. Veterans Ad- ministration offices are asking Red Cross workers. Each Vet's case has proved three times as expensive as each service man's assistance Most Of It Stays Here For these reasons Red Cross officials are requesting that, con- tributions be as liberal as possi- ble, adding that three-fifths of the goal raised remains in this county to operate the Pontotoc county Red Cross Chapter. About (iii businesses have re- I ported that 100 per cent of the of employes and management con- tributed. The Conway rural dis- trict is over its quota. And, one Eastern Star- has made its contribution. cautioned against releasing .secret of the atomic bomb at tune. Churchill, introduced by Prcsl- lent Truman who accompanied urn here from Washington, said he wanted to make clear that he spoke "only for myself" and that he had no official mission. Keep Atomic Secret Turning to tho atomic bomb. Churchill said that in view of tho uncertain world situation it would be "wrong and imprudent" for the United States, Britain and Canada to confide tho secret to the UNO while that still in its infancy." "No one in any he observed, "has slept less well in heir beds because this know- ledge and the method and the raw materials to apply it are at present retained in American hands." Churchill spoke of his "strong admiration and regard for the valiant Russian people and for my war-time comrade. Marshal Stalin." seeing 22 uninvited foreign news correspondents roaming Soviet- held Manchuria, have recovered and barred the door. Now that the stories are out, they're stop- ping trains to Mukden to search them for foreigners. Only surprise could have en- abled the coup which brought the first on-the-sccne stories of Soviet activities, in the opinion of the first group of newsmen to return. For Soviet hospitality cooled after thc first startled week. _ Undoubtedly any more for- eigners appearing in Russian- held territory will be in for a rough time unless they have pro- per Soviet-approved credentials when Soviet officers hear what the boys have been writing about. Wanted Real News (Gushing wrote about: Ship- ping of Japanese war prisoners to Siberia: dismantling and re- moval of Manchurian industrial plants; full-dress military man- euvers of the Red Army outside Dairen.) The first wave of eight Amer- icans and one British writer had grown weary of red-tape which kept them out of Manchuria. They wanted to cover what they considered a legitimate news story within the jurisdiction of Lt. Gen. Albert C. Wedcmeyer, U. S. commander in the China theater which includes Man- churia. So they climbed aboard a train to Mukden. Russians in Mukden still were suffering from that first shock when another group of a dozen correspondents 'arrived by the same expedient, bringing the total there to 21. A French news- man turned up later, alone. Got To "Room" Some The first group found the Rus- sians guarding the city with sub- machineguns. The news m e n didn t look around much, at first Tin? Soviets put them in the In- tourist hotel and said it would be dangerous outside. The cor- respondents fumed, until cvcn- tuallv the Russians said they could roam. Certain factories, however, remained banned. The second wave registered at the Intourist without incident and proceeded to look over the city. .The first wave meanwhile de- cided to go to Changchun, the capital. The Mukden command- ant strongly urged them not to go. They went, by night. That was a week ago, and they haven't been heard from, except indi- rectly. Chinese sources said they were detained at first, but later freed. Unwelcome In Dairen Three newsmen including this correspondent and Associa- ted Press Photographer Julian to Dairen. The Dairen commandant was not happy about this. He told us, in effect, that we were standing (uninvited, on So- viet soil. We went back to Muk- Spain to Run Own Affairs den, some Russian guards going along for the ride. From Mukden, we for the long, cold ride back to Lhmhsieii. We got a rousing Soviet guard stopped our Chinese truck enroute to the train by firing a sub-machinegun burst over our heads. But when :ie found the foreigners were became quite cheery, and even provided us with an escort. He didn't want us to miss our riin. Rains Due To Be Over Soon Cold Not Expected to Be Severe with Easing Of Woothcr on Wednesday agency Acians were rather expecting this morning to he cold, but it was only wet. with .05 of an inch of rain here by 7 a.m. and with a line fall of moisture continuing into the day! Instead of cold, the night's min- imum was 60 degrees. The wea- ther change has been cooling the temperature during the days, however, lowering it from Satur- day's high of 77 to 74 on a gusty to CD on a cloudy Week, Stale Down TUI.SA, Okla., March average crude oil pro- r.ir.s: Fridav in Nebraska and Kansas, spreading over Oklaho- ma and Missouri by Saturday. j soldier who can work a furlough can have a wonderful time on very little money." said Bowie Ballard, former master sergeant in the army. Red Cross workers have taken over an old castle and turned it into a pleas- ure resort. You can play golf with the rajah, swim in his swimming pool, ride the rajah's elephants ductiofi increas'ed in the week ending March 2. the Oil and Gas Journal reported today. Kansas gaiii Illinois 2.1100 nia 2.550 to 8-4 to New Mexico 150 to and Montana -10 to 21.R90. The eastern area slumped to Colorado to Oklahoma (100 to 389 -150 Texas to Arkansas 500 to and Wyoming SO to MM -i Extending Sphere While he said he understood Russia s need to he secure on her western frontiers from all renew- al of German aggression and wel- comed her "to her rightful place among the leading nations in the world." he added: "Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vien- na. Budapest, Belgrade, Burchar- est and Sofia, all those famous cities and populations around them lie m the Soviet sphere and all are subject in one form or another, not only to Soviet in- flU9pce but to a very high and increasing measure of control from Moscow. "Athens alone, with its immor- .al glories, is free to decide its future at an election under Brit- sh. American and French obser- vation. The Rusian-dominatcd 3ohsh government has been en- to make enormous and vrongful inroads upon Germany, and mass expulsions of millions Germans on a scale grievous and undreamed-of are now tak- ing place." Not What We FoiiRht For Churchill saying Turkey and Persia are "profoundly alarmed" by claims made upon them by Moscow and that the Russians in Iierlm are attempting to buildup a "quasi-communist party" in Germany, a-jerted "this is cer- tainly not the liberated Europe we fought to build up." Russian communistic influence. Sunday and Monday. The Associated Press reports a steady rain spreading across Ok- lahoma today but the federal weather bureau said it would be shortlived. Freezing At Amarillo Heaviest fall was expected in the eastern part but some mois- ture apparently had reached al- most every section of the state after a week of drying winds. Will Discuss Charter Move Meeting Tonight to Talk Ordinance for Freeholder Board to Revise Charter he continued, is at work in Italy and France. And the outlook, he added, "is also anxious in the far East and especially in Man- churia." led to 214.500, amt m .thc States. Louisiana 850 Iormcr prlmc minister said, communist parties or fifth columns constitute a growing challenge and peril to Christian civilization." While saying ho repulsed the idea that a new war is imminent or even inevitable, Churchill de- clared "our fortunes are in our own and because of this, "I feel the duty to speak out now." Amarillo, Tex., far to the west, reported a freezing fog, with tem- peratures at 30 degrees. Dodge City had .05, and Wichita Falls had thundershowers, indicating that the storm was moving south- east. The official forecast for this area calls for cloudy and cooler intermittent light rain. While the moisture will be light it will be helpful for all crops, and cooler weather will tend to hold back crops which arc too far advanced for the season. The statewide forecast calls for freezing weather in the Panhan- dle during the night, but with temperatures of around 45 in the southeast. Warmer Wednesday Cloudy and colder weather is expected to move into the south and east during the day, with warmer and partly cloudy by to- morrow seen for western Okla- homa. The extended forecast calls for warmer weather Wednesday and c'iturday with moderate Saturday again in Ok- forecast calls copier Saturday with moderate rams by lahoma. I Icaviest for (Continued on Page 2 Column 7) TULSA. Okla.. March 5. An American Legion post cxcusi- vely for members of labor un- ions will be established here if the group's charter application is approved, O. .T. Carney, a com- mittceman. said today. Carney explained only 15 sig- natures were required but the I ulsa application carried names of prospective members. Greater returns lor amount In- News Classified Ads Must Stand Together Terming the doctrine of a bal- ance of power unsound, he con- tinued: "We can not afford, if we can help it. to work on narrow mar- gins, offering temptations to a trial of strength. If the western democracies stand together in strict adherence to the principles of the United Nations charter. (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) l-lllll-auil V tllHl cooler Saturday with mock-rate rams by Saturday again in Ok- lahoma. Heaviest rain fall in the slate apparently was .11 reported at Oklahoma City. Slillwater had .7 Ponca City .02. Tulsa .01, while a trace fell at most other stations Ponca City, with a top of 75, apparently was the hot spot in Oklahoma yesterday, while Way- noka, with a low of 35, was the coolest overnight. EvidencTAgainsI Slayer Lined Up BLOOMINGTON, Ind., March Robert Mc- <_rca today prepared evidence for submission tomorrow to a grand jury which will convene to con- sider action against Joseph Lu- ther Woolridge, 29-year-old ne- gro janitor in jail on a charge of first degree murder in the slay- ings of Russell E. Koontz and Mrs. Phyllis Coleman. McCrea said that Woolridge had signed a statement giving complete details of the slayings last Friday of the 43-year-old Uloomington businessman and Mrs. Coleman. 32-year-old cream- ery office employe. Their bodies were found in an abandoned stone mill near Bloomington Fri- day night What is a freeholder? What is a board of freeholders for? What has that to do with thc city election of March 19 and what concern is it to voters and citizens? These and related questions will be answered tonight at a meeting at the Aldridge hotel to which all interested citizens are invited. The meeting has been arranged by a Better Government commit- tee representing a number of groups here who are of the opin- ion that efficiency of Ada's city government is handicapped by some provisions of the charter adopted in 1912 and want to get a study begun for amendment and revision. It will begin at o'clock. The discussion will be primal ily on an ordinance to be submit ted to Ada voters March 19, a ordinance that would provide fo election of a board of freeholder at the April voting to study th charter with modernization am revision in view. Some of the present chartc provisions will be discussed ti show where those that were ap iropriate to a city of 5.000 in 191L are in the way of efficient cit' government under today's chang" ed conditions and much larger population. New Sugar Stamp Due Valid Monday Through Oct. 31; Next Regular Stamp Becomes Valid May 1 WASHINGTON, March may get a little more sugar for home canning this year than last season. OPA revealed this today in an- nouncing that spare stamp num- ber nine will become valid next Monday for five pounds of sugar. It will be good through October   Blanlti. Jr. A bad cold, bad weather cr business reasons r.cvcr stops anybody frum bein' thcr' if they have a pass. At th" present price a quart, day more folks re wher" they wuz last night t   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication