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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 28, 1946 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 28, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The refu5ed, ,o in .he next sprin9 when Bon.... are explojed Fair tonight and Friday; warmer east and south tonlpht; strong southwest winds today. 42nd 270 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Five Japs To Hang for Part In Executions Dozen Others to Prison For Strangulation, Cremation Of Three Yank Fliers By RICHARD MASSOCK SHANGHAI. Feb. 28. Seventeen Japanese military men were sentenced to the gallows. 12 to the strangulation and cremation of three American B-29 fliers at Hankow in December. 1944. An 18th defendant, the lone civilian to be tried, was acquitted. The U. S. military trial com- mission decreed death by hang- ing for: Gen. Masatakn Kafcuragi. chief of staff and deputy com- mander of the Japanese 34th army in Hankow: Warrcnt Offi- cer Tsutomu Fujii, who super- vised the killings; and the trio who pulled the cords about the helpless airmen's necks: SRt. Major Shozo Mnsui. SRt. Koichi Masuda, and Pvt. Yosaburo Shir- akawa. American defense counsel said the condemned men probably would ask Gen. Albert C. Wcde- rr.eyer. theater commander and reviewing authority, for clemen- that no higher appeal was planned. Civilian Acquitted Col. Kameji Fukomoto, com- mandant of Japan's Hankow gen- darmerie, was sentenced to life imprisonment. Terms of others ranged from 18 months to 20 years. The civilian who was ac- quitted had served only as a wit- ness at the killings, testimony showed. All but Fujii heard their sen- tences without a flicker of ex- ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1046 Customers Win When Japs Strike Urges Rapid 18 Nations Telephone calls were free to the public when workers went on stnlie recently, but ofllcials of the Communications Ministry were unable to make calls at all. Instead ot walking off the Job or sitting idle, the switchboard operators went on working but made no charge to customers. Some 200 strikes the past live months Have won 5GO_pcr cent waRc increases in this manner. Photo by NEA-Acmc Correspondent Tom Shafcr, (Continued on Page 5 Column 4) Volunteer Workers For Red Cross Outside Ada Named Key volunteer workers for the county outside of Ada were an- nounced today by Mrs. Joyce MUIer. county district workers chairman for the 1946 American Red Cross Fund Campaign here. The workers will launch their work through the towns, com- munities and farms of every sec- tion of the county next Monday. The rest of the Red Cross cam- paign, in Ada is working through final preparations, according to Oscar L. Parker, county chair- man. The Pontotoc County Red Chapter headquarters, at 210 South Broadway, is a hub of activity, getting ready for the 4rs, Holley, Ada Meeting Is Called >ioneer Who Made 89 Run, Is Dead Mrs. Mary Kllen Ilolley, 84, ho made the Hun in and whose husband, the Holley, established F. drug store in Ada in died Wednesday at the home of a daughter. Mrs. Grace Alter, in Oklahoma City Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p.m. from the Smith Funeral Chapel; burial will be in Rosedale cemetery Pallbearers will be W. J. Bishop, M. W. Seybold, Yancy Norton, Tom Tailant, T A Crumb nnd Elmer Dean Made "Kim" in Wagon Mrs. Holley was born in Mis- souri, was married at Ft. Scott Kas. In 1889 she and Mr. Holley made the 'run' in a wagon, settl- ing in Oklahoma City. For a time he owned the 'He where the Oklahoma City post- office now stands. After two or three years there he Holleys moved to White-bead Hill, now just Whitebead, in Gar- vm .county, then to Center, living there .several years. Dr. Holley established the dm store here in 1000 and in 190 moved his family here from Con ter. He sold his store in 1923 an died in Suffered Stroke Feb. 18 Mrs. Holley has been spendin, recent winters with Mrs. The following are the names of the Red Cross volunteers to han- dle the 194G campaign in the county: Johnson Carter L. Richardson C. Gregory M. Zimmerman H. Parsons E. Teague M. Littlcjohn Reynolds N. McKeel Green McCalls G. Pipkin Mrs. Exie Evn Haskins Nadine Fleming S. Graham Parish Louise El- liott Gentry Vivian Cruson. M. Nance Lela Rose Black Kuykcn- dall Helen Scott Reynolds Lottie Bevers Irene McFarland Lnion R. H. Ha C. Treas Heloise Jenn- ings Rocky Myrtle Hoss LiRhtninR Barnez Parker W. Brown Lillie M. Wilson Edna Myers Viva Poole Union Oma H. Enloo Pleasant L. Wilmoth Edytho Myers Horse Lela Duke Owl V. Selders Cedar Bcttye D-inor W. F. Simpson Medlock Pecan H. V. Bur- .rough harn LaVon Gra- Red May Buchann- an (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) iw EAT HER] __ tonight and Friday; wanner east and south ItiniRht: lowest 45 northwest to 50 (ind smith; colder northwest and extreme north Friday after- noon; rtrcing southwest winds to- day, reaching 40-50 miles pur hour in gusts except panhandle, tonight. was in serious condition from then until her death. Surviving are two daughters Mrs. Maude Stockbridge, Lan sing Mich., ami Mrs. Aker: a son Paul Holley. of the home address 318 East Ninth; five grandchild rcn and one-great grandchild. More Testimony Is Anti-Conscription Two Educational Groups Join Capper hi Assailing Peacetime Draff WASHINGTON. Feb. 28._f7P> for two educational joined Senator Capper (R-Kas) today in urging legisla- tion s'jcking an international ban on peacctinio conscription. rhi'y testified before the house- military committee on behalf of J resolution by hou.se republican Leader Martin of Massachusetts to defer action on compulsory universal training pending efforts to outlaw it everywhere. The Rev. Edward V. Stanford, rector of Augustinian college, Washington, and spokesman for the national Catholic educational association, told the committee he was "not impressed" by those who believe the United Nations should not seek to outlaw con- scription. "The effort should be made he said. "In nn other way, I am convinced, can this nation in good conscience consider propos- als for universal military train- mR in peacetime." The views of the national edu- cation association were presented by William G Carr, based on pol- icy expressions made formally by groups last December. "We do not favor a system of coiiipulsory peacetime military training because we do not think that at the present time that is the best way to get Carr said. If other measures fail, he add- ed, compulsory military training service "could be adopted as a last resort." For Veterans On On-Job Training J. B. Walters has called a Rcn- eral meeting of all veterans now employed under the on-thj-job training program to discuss nnd set up a plan for the schooling which is a requirement for veter- ans who are employed under the program. Tlio meeting will be held in the district courtroom, third floor of the county courthouse, Friday, March 1, at p.m. Walters also would like to have present all other veterans inter- ested in on-the-job training so that ho can get a list of addition- al ex-servico men who want such training, along with the type of work each desires. This information will assist in two ways, he in charge will know what types of jobs are desired so that employ- ers can be contacted about using veterans in those kinds of work, and it will give those in charge a better idea of how many vet- erans want and need such work. Employers interested in em- ploying or who already have in their establishments veterans working under this program are invited to attend the meeting, which those in charge believe will be informative for them as well as for the veterans. Arrangements for the meeting are being made with the assist- ance of the VFW post here. Negro Nurses Begin Final Training Eight from South Carolina To Work in Ward, Attend Separate Classes OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb. negro senior cadets From South Carolina will begin 'inal phases of their nurse's .raining at University hospital tomorrow. Application Of New Policy CPA Head Says Will Start U. S. Toward Production; Senate Lops CPA And OPA Funds WASHINGTON, Feb. way to put America on the road to peak production is "fast, very fast" application of the gov- ernment's new wage-price policy John D. Small said today. _ The civilian production admin- istrator told a reporter "we've cot to Ret these strikes settled and we ve cot to Ret people willing to produce." The new stabilization formula will accomplish this, Small added, if the full measure of wage and price-help it allows is meted out speedily to labor nnd manage- mcnt. The OPA chief called for quick application of the policy after re- portinR that the nation's industri- al production is at the lowest point in five years because of strikes. Small released his monthly production review after the sen- ate Rave the OPA rouRh handlinR yesterday by slashinfi from a bill to Rive it of extra operating funds. Despite an administration plea the cut would "cripple" the national housinR proRram, the senate voted it by a 44-30 marRin. OPA Rot similar treatment. The senate, by n 45-to-25 vote, lopped from its proposed H54.000 extra appropriation, heed- less of arRuments that the reduc- tion would sabotafie the price control battle aRainst inflation. In rcportinR on the production outlook. Small said last night that there will be a further decline be- fore things Ret better, but that one wage-price problems are solved, "steady and rather rapid Rams may be anticipated." FIVE CENTS THE COPY Start Dividing Reparations Russia Gets Half of Equip- ment; Division May Re- quire Two or Three Years To Finish Job BRUSSELS. Feb. DeloR.ites of 18 nations began to- day to divide the reparations from Germany, a task which is expected to require two or three years. It was the first mcelinR of the interallied reparation agency in its permanent sent. Russia has beer, allocated half of Germany's "industrial and oth- er capital equipment" that is to be removed. The delegates sitting today will distribute the other half in accord with a percentage basis established in Paris in Jan- Striking GE Workers Lose In Battle With Philly Police and March On City Hall To Protest water uary. Nations present and their per- centage of the "industrial and other capital equipment removed from including mer- chant ships and inland transport, United States 11.8; Australia .95; Belgium 4.5; Canada 1.5; France 22.8; United Kingdom 27.8; Greece 4.15; India 2.9; the Netherlands 5.GO; and Yugoslavia 9.6. 'The American share might seem low in comparison to the U. S. war said James W. U. S. minister and dele- gate to the allied commission on war reparations, now sitting in .Berlin, "but the policy our gov- ernment chose to follow was to allow desolated countries of west- ern Europe to have the major share of German plants in order to speed recovery. "We arc claiming all the fore- ign assets Germany had in Am- erica and a division of German shipping proportipnate to our losses." And Union Break OH Talks, Agree to Resume Conciliator Arranges Meet- ing After Break Leading To Strike HaJ Appeared Final NEW YORK, Feb. Negotiations between the Amer- ican Telephone and Telograp Co., and the independent Federa lion of Long Lines Telephon workers, will be resumed her Sunday m un effort to avert threatened strike, Mr. Caldwel, regional director of the U. S. con dilation service, said today A union official had said carlj today after a 14-hour conference that the nefiotiations were brok Hangs Yamashita en off. Caldwell said the Sunda meeting between the two partie" had been arranged by Peter J Manno, a conciliator who direct ed last night's session. Neither Side Makes Comment Neither nor the union had any immediate comment. J. J. Moran, president of the which is affiliated will the National Federation of Tele- phony Workers said after the meeting: are finished. Our answer will be March 7. C. of C. Chairmen Report On Outlook For 1946 Activities Aviation Committee Reports Oil Companies Offering to Build Hangar at City's Airport; Road Ideas Talked Some oil companies have offered to build a hangar on Ada's airport, some reportedly willing to invest as much as Luther Edge, chairman of the Chamber of Commerce aviation committee, declared before the members today. The committee chairmen were reporting the plans adopted i T datc hns bopn p by the NFTW for the start of a nation-wide telephone strike. Moran said his union offered to accept a to weekly wage increase with the provision the organization would have the right to distribute the increases according to its own seniority scale Previously the union sought a weekly boost and a reduction of the work week from 40 to 35 hours. The company, Moran said, of- fered a flat a week increase traffic employes and boosts of ?4 to for plant employes A spokesman for the A. T. T. said: "The meeting broke up with- out results. No further meeting has been scheduled, but the com- pany will be very willing to meet union representatives any- time. by each group for 1946. The way for their entrance to he stale school was cleared yes- erday when the attorney Senator Capper contended that the lessons of history prove thai compulsory military s e r v i c e, while nut perhaps a direct cause >f war, certainly is a temptation to rulers engage in war." During the Ilncr War .bullets ised in the defense of Kimbcr- ,.y were stamped with the vords: "With C. J. Rhodes' com- ilimcnts." Head the Ada News Want Ads. -nil handed down an opinion tc 3r. George- L. Cross, president o. hi? University of Oklahoma, that 'there are no legal barriers t< negroes taking University hos- pital nurse's Cross said the nurses would Complete their training at th  e utomobile industry had lost mere ban in -.nlea c.im- nissions and other millions were ost by conipan.i-3 and workers ependent upon General Motors or parts. One such concern is the Pack- rd Motor Car Co., whose a 000 reduction have been die more than a ironth because f a shortage of parts supplied y GM Against this costly background 10 corporation and the CIO Unit- ed Automobile Workers' union scheduled another meeting today with special Labor Mediator James F. Dewey, seeking a back- to-work formula. Today's meeting of the negotia- tors began with management and union representatives still ap- parently apart on the issues of wages, seniority and vacations. The union is demanding a wage increase of 19V1- cents an hour and the company has refused to go higher than 18Vi cents. The UAW-CIO. basing its cal- culations on a 40-hour work week, placed the wage loss at and the management, figuring the week at hours, fixed the amount at 000. In Flint. Mich., where production workers represent the greatest concentration of GM employes in a single community. strikers' families are listed as receiving welfare relief. The Flareup Results In Injuries fo 20 Or More, 15 Arrests Mounted Cops Break Advance on Plant After Pickets March Through Police Lines PHILADELPHIA, Feb., 28, General Electric com- pany workers and driven from the streets around the GE plant in a free-for-all bat- tle with police, marched on city hall today, virtually halting traf- fic while they demanded an audience with Mayor Bernard Samuel. After nn hour-long around the city hall, during which blocked street cars ringed building almost solidily for 20 minutes, a union sound truck an- nounced that union delegates had gone into conference in the mayor's office and asked the crowd to stand by. Police estimated the numbered 3.000 to They were led by CIO-Electrical Work- ers union leaders who sought to protest to the mayor what they termed "police brutality Score Injured In Fiare-Cp The flare-up nl the General Electric plant, one of the most violent in postwar labor troubles, resulted in injuries to a score or more and arrest of 15 on inciting to riot charges. Three thousand marchers broke through police lines three blocks from the plant, bowline over six officers on motorcycles before II mounted policemen rode into their ranks and routed the men and women in the parade. The estimated number of injured ranged as high as 20. It was the second straight day In which CIO-Electrical Workers and sympathizers fought-police enforcing an Injunction prohibi- ting mass picketing at General Electric. Claim Not Violating Injanctiea Union leaders, asserted they were not violating the injunction but were conducting a march oa city hall to "protest police bru- tality." Acling Sheriff William J. Morrow declared he had order- ed police to break up all gather- ings of workers within a six- block radius of the plant, strike- bound since Jan. 15. Skirmishes between police and the marchers flared throughout average payment is family each month. a Wenfz Will Not Be Pledged lo Anyone OKLAHOMA CITY. Fob 28 II. Wcntz, Ponca City, Republican national committee- man for Oklahoma, will not be pledged to any candidate for national chairman when he goes to Washington for a special com- mittee meeting April 1, he said today. Wentz said the resignation of Herbert Brownell, Jr., did not as an "entire surprise" to lim and made it plain he was not supporting any candidate for the southwest Philadelphia area for a half hour before Morrow reported the situation under con- trol. The marchers then began 53. block trek to city hall. More than persons, led by a flaR-bearcr, reached city hall shortly after noon. Hundreds ot policemen, carrying nightsticks, stood guard. Philadelphians jammed into the central city plara the historical municipal buil'.ing to watch the marchers. In the early morning hours, the 575 police on duty in the area scattered all groups of pickets and took two persons Into cus- tody for nuestioning. Retire, Form Parade The pickets then retired six blocks from the plant into Dtla- ware county and formed a parade. Led by men wearing military uniforms, the crowd started mov- ing, picking up hundreds of sym- pathizers on the way. The line of marchers, three blocks long, paraded through suburban upper Darby singing the song, "solidarity forever." national GOP chairman. "I have no favorite for the Wentz said. "Some man vho may loom strong today may be out of the running by the ime the committee meets. And omeone not mentioned by then may loom as the logical man." Wcntz said he was keeping lands off in a contest between C. Nixon, Tulsa, present state it-publican chairman, and Carl lorgan. Guthrie. who has an- lounced in opposition to Nixon. The issue will be decided at he state GOP convention here April 22. -------------K------------ The stork had the busiest year n the history of the United talcs during 1043, with birth of babies. Several lines of police tried to halt the march but the paraderm continued with their ranks un- broken. Morrow read not act for the second straight day and ordered the marchers to disperse. Three blocks away, the march- ers turned towards the General Electric plant. At that point. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) TH' PESSIMIST Br Bob BlMlu. JB, An expert shot with a rifle couldn't put n bullet th carrier boy generally throws our paper. Anyway, th' feller who has one these days, has t1 keep his shirt on.   

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