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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 26, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 26, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             That line of -hold Hie line" against price and wage rises has been shoved back from midfield fo Inside the 20-yard line and inflation is still carrying the ball in power plays against it. WEATHER Fair tonirht and colder tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 268 Goering Is Still Bold, Nazi Leader Von Papen Most Danger- ous; German Defense Seeking to Clear Nation Of Guilt By DtWITT MacKENZIE AP World Travrlrr NUERNBERG. Germany, Feb. correspondent has run into Reichs-Marshal Hermann Gcormg here and is mighty clad to see him again. Because this time he :s where he the clock of the Allied court on the charge of crimes against hu- manitv. ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY N. V. TRANSIT STRIKE THREAT ENDS Race Riot Flares in Ten Persons Wounded in Overnight Disorders Thar Bring Patrolmen, Guard Units in; Situation Quieter Tuesday COLUMBIA. Tenn.. Feb. apparently Hitler's crown prince is look- i had bccn restored in Columbia late this morning after riot- ing far better than I've ever seen ous overnight disorders in tho especially since he has lost a huge amount of the fat he used to lug about with him. He also seems remarkably cheerful and lull of bean.-, if you will pardon the expression, especially for one who is sitting on death's front s overnight disorders in the negro-populated section which ten persons, including four policemen, were wounded. More Workers Asking Jobs Applicants Numerous, Job Placements Down; USES Appeals for Community Help With the number of workers actively seeking work here Fire Destroys Frisco Bridge All Rail Traffic Between Ada, Holdcnvillc Re-Routed While Repairs Rushed Three hundred feet of a Frisco railroad bridge across the South Canadian between Ada and Hol- denvillc was destroyed by fire Monday afternoon s'topping all traffic between Ada and Holdcn- ville. Passengers traveling by train are not loosing much time'as they arc being.muted from Holdcnvil- Ie to Madill by bus transporta- tion. Mail and other small items are being handled by the Frisco ,m.j- soon company trucks. found out. For another leader r G.' Denny, agent for the came over in a r risco in Ada. said that rvt-i-i- Kit doorstep. He has lost little if any o. the self confidence and ego he possessed when I saw him m action at Munich in 1938. and Jater in Berlin as he and his chief were putting the finishing touches on their conspiracy against mankind. Never Lacked Courage Still it isn't .surprising to see Gj.cnng battling for life with a grin and a fair exhibition of non- chalance. For to give the devil his due. Hermann has never been accused of lacking physical cour- age. He won his spurs in the first world war, you know, with his spectacular showmanship and I was on the British front when the famous Baron Rich- thofen. leader of the "Flying Circus" was .shot down in his crirr.scn plane. He was Ger- many's greatest ace and a lot of .OIK wondered what would hap- pen to the circus. They came over in a crimson F.risro in that every hit and that was young Goering. of "i'Jipment is being utilized in Vanity Pleased By Attention ho Hitlers runnerup is making a fight of it in court. Of course he knows very well that his chances of .-scaping death are Mayor Eldi idge Denham said the situation was under control and advised Gov. Jim McCord in Nashville that it would not be necessary to declare martial U 17 I ly outpacing the number being France Has Closed Frontier of Spain Declares Situation in Spain Constitutes Danger For International Security; Tension Between Two Growing By LOUIS NEVIN PARIS. French government today pranco Spain closed, effective at e i- t-----. the local office March 1, declaring the present situation in Spain tmm a "dangor for international security." ice of the United f lilc r rcnch cabinet's action was taken after a lengthy ''USES1 i cxPlanatio" of tlle situation by Foreign Minister Georges aea _ fc pealed today for community wide l no tension between the two countries has been riCCIct'i f almost nil. However, he's stick- ing to the old adage that while tntres life there's hope and anyway, it pleases his vanity to attract attention in a courtroom crowded with the nationals if many countries. He's the central figure in the how well he realizes Jt. as he scribbles notes for his attorney, nods approval of argu- ments by the defense or shakes disapproval of some point bv the prosecution. Goermg's penchant for theatricals has given a lot of .mk tr.e idea that he's just a buf- foon, but don't get that mistaken notion. He's smart and his or- ability and driving force had much to do with put- ting the M.idi on such a power- ful footing that Hitler almost conquered Europe. Von Paprn Most Dangerous But despite all the evil which Goering has done, he isn't the one to be most feared among the chieftains on trial. That dis- tinction falls to Franz Von Pap- rn. the crafty worker behind the srrr.es who built IHtlcr up with of doublecrossmg him an effort to have the bridge re- paired by Thursday. He said that train traffic may riot be resumed before Friday. The fire started However, the mayor re- assistance in a job development growing for a week quested the governor to keep program to reduce unemnlov-' ______i__ state guard units and highway j ment. patrolmen here throughout the I His appeal was issued in line 1 i rultons To Check Up Next Time niglit. "Everybody Wants Peace' The trouble is over and ev- erybody wants peace." said State Commissioner Lvnn Bomar after a mid-morning loudspeaker tour of the troubled area in which he told the negroes "we are hero to protect you just as much as the people on the other side of town." Meanwhile, more than 60 per- sons had been arrested, 12 of whom Bomar said had been charged with attempt to commit murder. All business in this city of 12- 000 remained virtually at a standstill and the more 'than 400 guardsmen ordered here by Mc- Cord dispersed any gathering of the citizenry. Started In Repair Shop The trouble started brewing following an altercation yester- day afternoon in which Sheriff I. J. Underwood said William Hemmg, 28-year old radio re- pairman, was pushed through a plate glass window by a negro with a campaign being carried on nationally by USES in an effort to get workers into jobs in their local communities, particularly recently returned veterans. It is estimated nationally that there will be (i.OOIMVIO unemployed by June 30, a great number of veter- ans among them, unless present trends are reversed. Applications Rise "In July. we had only SB active applications." Ayers said. "We only had 1.085 office con- tacts during that month and placed 175 in jobs here and else- where. By December. 1945, the active applications had increas- ed to 44S with 2778 office con- tacts and only 48 placements. n January, the office contacts Ind Increased to with 921 ilUnr applications and actively weklnjr work. We placed only j i the north and her son.- It came to a head end of the bridge and was so. I during the night when four of far out when found that fire I the city's eight patrolmen we-e lighting equipment could not be s'lot "s they entered the negro llcnH in ft _ _ _.i. VJ used to combat the flames. Railroad workmen cut off section. The others were wound- later in the night and at dawn i .---w. uuu tit, uitwn miming section of the bridge I -when approximately 100 hlgh- about feet from the north I u'iiv patrolmen moved into the band of the river and started c'i-1-" i-.._'.. making repairs. The orgin of the fire had not been determined bv titles. i _ railroad officials. Heavy freight that has to be district. a negro business Lynn Bomar. state The manager pointed out that veteran traffic through the office lad increased in about the same proportion with contacting the office. applying for work and 25 placed. In Decem- ber, 1945. the veteran contacts were 1.203 with 1.130 filing plieations and 27 placed. The July figures were 224 contacts, 52 applications and placed Must Have More Places We must have orders from moved bv train is being re-rout- ed on other lines. .VF. Hl.t So in Joachim Von Uibbentrop time forngn minister, who a.so tricky but no match for Von Papen.'Then there's Julius Jew baiter whole evil mind registers on his repul- sive fare. Lives .Main ISSUM Government Speeds Checks to Vets Where Payments Overdue To Man in School, Special Effort to Be Made WASHINGTON. Feb. veteran in school whose government check is late is go- ing to get a priority covering everything it takes to get it to mm, the veterans administration promised today. Heginning Friday, representa- tives will go out from each field office to "interview personally" any veteran having difficulty about getting his .subsistence al- lowance. "In any where payments I are overdue." an administration I announcement said, "the VA rep- I resentatives will record the ne- information. i d to the re- So runs the list of defendants lor whom German legal experts are exerting all their skill Os- tensibly the lives of these'Nazi leaders are the main issue of the actually th.- Ger- i man lawyers aie subtly injecting i clearing the ca.se wift even, more important issue I m'only to the handling lhe trial, ind that is to ac- n-eords and clear- t.'ir nation of any crime-; for the veteian cessary identifying which will be relay gional office, cither bv telcphoYie or in person, before close of bus- iness the same day. all -VA personnel 1 an int uic be 'Y' o. fatherland projected fre- ThiMhi-mr Ming of defen.se (Continued on 3. Column 7) President Gefiin Invitation fo Eat his check. WASHINGTON'. Fi-l> President Truman Iti Mime chili today with old liirntis in the senate When Leslie tcciftary. mentioned Senate Okays Move For Homes Measure Would Provide Temporary Homes for Families of Servicemen, Vets WASHINGTON. Frb. I to provide senate temporary h j m e s this a con- year for families of .servicemen also Director S n v d e r were on the guest But ling previous ino.OIJll-hom was pure- I earlier S160.flllO.onn ap e pro- Slino.OOO.OOO to an Head the Aria News Want Ads. {WEATHER) and Wednesday, coldrr tonight, some- what warmer Wednesday after- noon. iin-i oiutMHru.ouu appropriation Senator Taft (R-Ohio) told the senate it was contemplated that most of the used m tearing down unneedcd army _ ban-arks and putting tin- materials into construction of temporary homes at universities and m cities. This will cost moiv per unit, he thc Previously approv- ed 100.000-home program involv- ing chiefly movement of tempor- ary housing from war plant and similar locations to new sites (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) ColdeFWeaiheTis Due After Warm Weekend in State Blustery wind which blew dur- ing most of the night had little effect on temperatures, the wea- ther report seems to indicate. And Monday's daytime wind  rmg his vehicle to a stop within the assured clear distance ahead and without due regard to traf- fic there. was arres- ted II of Ada. in i'i T- Cai'txyi''i8lit. a passenger in the Connelly car, paid a line mid costs after entering a fcy Kuilly bcforc Perfy Last Friday the consultative (.assembly overwhelmingly voted a protest over the execution of 10 Spanish Republicans by the .Spanish government. Madrid dis- patches last night said 37 persons were convicted by a court mnr- tial at Alciila De Henares on charges of attempting to reor gamze the Socialist party in Spain and three of them "were given 12-year prison terms. Will Inform Britain, U. S. The communique issued after today's cabinet meeting said the ministers had "decided to again inform the governments of the United Stales and Great Britain that the present situation in Spain constitutes a danger for international security." Early in December'Franco ask- ed the United States and Britain to confer with her on the pos- sibility of breaking off relations with Generalissimo Francisco franco's regime. Bidault conferred on the mat- ter with both British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin and U. S. Secretary of State James F. Byrnes while heading the French delegation to the first United Nations assembly in London. French Discontent Grows Results of these conversations have not yet bccn announced, and r rcnch discontent over the continuance In power -of the franco government has been in- creasing. Protest meetings and demon- strations have taken place throughout France and her north African colonies since the an- nouncement of the execution of the Spanish headed by Cnstino Garcia who fought in the French resistance forces against the Germans. The French general confedera- tion of labor yesterday directed is adherents to refuse to handle me _ shipment of any freight to Soam, and the World Federation Senate Not For Most Of Case Bill Ellender Soys Committee Won't Agree to Injunction, Damage Suit Prorisions I By J. W. DAVIS WASHINGTON, Feb., 26, Acting Chairman Ellender La.) said today "there is no chance'1 thc senate labor commit- tee will go along with the house in calling for federal court in- jimctioiis against labor violence. Nor is there any chance the committee will approve a provi- sion for damage suits for breach of labor-management contracts, he told reporters. The committee is nearing the end of public hearings on the bill of Rep. Case (H-SD) which in- cludes these provisions. Says Sentiment Clear Kllender said sentiment is clear that approval of the Case bill as it passed the house would be regarded ns overthrowing the anti injunction guarantee to labor in thc Norris LaGuardia act. Thc Case bill would permit courts to enjoin against even a threat of violence. Asked what thc senate commit- tee might retain of thc Case bill, the acting chairman said his cucss was that it would provide for a board to mediate labor dis- putes independently of the labor deoartmcnt. Public HrarinRs End Wednesday The board would go into opera tion only nfter conciliation o voluntary arbitration efforts fai ed tn settle a labor-managcmcn dispute. The committee is to wind u nublic hearings tomorrow wit he appearance of CIO rcpresen .ativcs. eluded Today's witness list In representatives of th Strike Plan Called Off Union Withdraws Demand For Designation as Sola Transit Bargainer NEW YORK. Fib.. 26 Mayor William O'Dwyer said to- I day the threat of a city-wide tran- (D- sit strike had been called off. The mayor made the announce- ment after a conference at city ball with CIO President Philip Murray. He said the CIO Transport Workers union, headed bv City Councilman Michael J. Quill, had withdrawn its demand for desig- nation as sole collective bargain- ing agent for transit workers. Special Committee Named O'Dwyer also said n special transit committee would nam- ed by him to .study working con- ditions, wages and labor between the employes and the board of transportation. Yesterday McGrndy and David Sarnoff. RCA president, conferr- ed with Murray in Washington on the transit situation. An air of tension prevailed as members of the board of trans- portation. Arthur S. Meyer, chair- man of the slate mediation board, and other city and union officials joined the meeting. Before the session. O'Dwyer told reporters they could expect something final in the strike sit- Jation this afternoon. Murray on iis arrival from Washington said. I m an optimist." O'Dwyer Quotes State Law Even as the board of transpor- tation was called into session to consider the union's demand that it be recognized as sole collec- United Mine Workers, the Unil ?d States chamber of commerce he national association of fore -men mid the associated foremci of America. of Trade Unions called on its ,u. vithout raffic. Reckless. Unsafe Drlvlnr Jimmy Allen, charged with reckless driving, was fined and costs in the Armstrong court. the wagon said that he tried to kill the dog with a pitchfork, but could not get close enough. Mayor Guy Thrash said that every dog jn Ada without a license is subject to being shot and he has given members of the police department and the pound man orders to shoot any dog found under these circum- stances. During the past week, 52 dogs have been killed in A-.l.-i and there are several hundred others that should be killed, he -says. HOMINY, new mayor to succeed Leonard O. Hough, resigned, will be chosen at an election April 2 George Dupy, acting mayor since last October, will continue in office until a successor is named. Hough has gone into the grocery business at Perry. other nations is task of major re- "That responsibility now be- longs to you of the 'far eastern therefore sponsibility. commission. Byrnes said he wanted to com- mend to the commission "the progress thus far made" in Japan He said the directives issued and the administration established by General Douglas MacArllmr. rep- nsented ".sound and significant contributions to the transforma- tion." He added. however, that the allies ".should not for a moment lose sight of the important job that lies ahead. "The old structure of power and rule in Japan cannot be eli- minated in a matter of weeks or even of months." on cour. The complaint stated that his driving was reckless and unsafe and impudent and at a speed greater than would enable him to lim rtrtcnr dis- Unto ahead, taking into consider- ation the width and surface of the ther y traffic Armstrong court. Clif- A. Boyd was fined SS and cn.tcnnK inember federations to take sim- ilar action. Relations Already Scanty France has had no normal dip- omatic relations with Madrid since the collapse of the Vichy with the defeat of the jcrmans. Since then France has been represented in Spain by a liplomatic agent, while Spain las had a similar agent, Miguel with the personal rank of ambassador in Paris. Mateu has been in Spain since several hufore Christinas, how- The text of the cabinet com- munique on Spain: "Mr. Bidault gave an explana- of lhe international situa- council of ministers de- cided to again inform the gov- ernments of the United States and Great Britain that the pres- ent situation in Spain constitutes a danger for international secur- "It also decided to close the rrenrh-Spanish frontier to traf- fic, beginning the first of March at midnight." weeks ever. tion. ity. Increases Okayed In Ceiling Prices In Meat Industry Bowles Acts After General Pay Boost of Packing House Workers Ordered WASHINGTON. Feb. government today author- ized increases in the ceiling pri- ces in the meat packing industry and forecast that retail prices will rise about I'i per cent. Stabilization Director Chester Bowles took the action after the wage stabilization board ordered Secretary of Agriculture Ander- son to put into effect immediate- ly a general pay boost of 16 cents an hour for packing house work- ers. The wage hike previously had been recommended bv a govern- ment fact-finding panel. Bowles announced specific price increases for the packing industry, but said the OPA in- dustry advisory committee would meet with government represen- tatives in a few days "to advise with regard to changes required in wholesale and retail ceilings V v X X X. "The increase in meat prices f fJin.ua or the average family should not i an intersecting road. _Truman Nunnelly was of fined i A j u irjLt So and costs after entering a plea of having driven on the wrong side the street in the city of Ada without due regard for other trffic thereon. The case was filed in the Bourlimd justice court. TL'LsX The Capitol in Washington. D. I-., required 70 years to complete. A Tulsim was and fined sentenced to 90 days in jail to- day upon conviction of advertis- ing illicit liquor for sale. U. Wade Foor, head of the po- lice raiding squad, testified ,the defendant answered the tele- phone when he called one of two numbers listed on a business card and asked for Turner Says High Prices For Bulls Nof Inflationary KANSAS CITY, Fob 2G, Although prices, now bciiiR paid would have startled the cattle industry a few years ago. current nigli prices for purebred bulls are not inflationary. Hoy J Tur- ner, Sulphur, Okla.. president of [he American Hereford associa- tion, believes. Turner, here for the associa- :ion s annual meeting, said in an nterview that present high Jrices that breeders have bern willing to go higher and Higher m efforts to improve qua- lity of their herds He recalled that in Texas newspaper described him and a partner as "those crazy Oklahoma oil men." because they paid S6.HOO for a purebred Here- ford bull and SIB.800 for a group of five purebred bulls .and five females. Those prices are com- mon place now, he said. In a roundup sale of ilerrfords held in conjunction with the as- sociation meeting. 200 bulls were sold yesterday at an average of with the top 50 bulls selling at an average of S585. per Certain breeds of sheep devel- op four, five, or even six horns. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads amount to more than 1'j Bowles said. The ceiling price increases will be adequate, Bowles snid, to per- mit the packing industry to rea- -If) cents more per Ilio pounds on beef, veal and lamb, and 55 cents more per 100 pounds on pork on an over-all, dressed car- cass weight basis on sales fo domestic, civilian use. In addition, ceiling prices meat and meat products for pur chase by the federal governmen will In- further increased amounts equivalent to an aver" age of 25 cents per 100 pounds." No Speciaf Session Needed, Says Kerr OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb. 28 M emergency exists in the state to make necessary the call- I i i i "i ti special session of the legislature. Gov. Robert S. Kerr "lay wrote Elmer Vail. Enid state commander of the Vctcrns of foreign Wars. Vail, in a letter, asked Kerr to call a special session la deal with the veterans housing problem. lhe governor invited Vail to discuss veterans problems with him adding that "every facility of the state government is avail- able tn cooperate in meeting and solving such problems." Vo'nnn aKent for some 32.000 transit workers as an alter- native to a walkout. Mayor Wil- liam O Dwycr received added support on his stand that such a request was precluded by luw. The board of estimate backed the mayor's position and empow- ered the city in n resolution to transfer from one department to another key men needed tn oper- ate the municipally-owned sub- ways elevated, trolley and "bus lines Inc.. the event the striku aterialized, The CIO Transport -'iVnnn' 'r to 20.000 of the transit workers, baa threatened to call the strike any Th Jnc also seeks a vage increase. O'Dxvyer de- "usUfied Wa" dCmand Lookabaiigh fo Be Here, Too Aggie Coach Coming For Showing of Sugar Bowl Pic- tures Wednesday Night Jim LookabaiiRh. head coach of ie Oklahoma Aggies football W to be here Wednesday e. J. tl10 of the Ag- ic-St. Mary's Sugar Bowl classic ictures. The pictures will be u1 at the Ada ifih school auditorium. Looka- augh s comments on the film arc feature, too. The pictures are technicolor nd hose who have seen them are 'high' on Ior 1ht.ir Pictur.ng of the great game at New Orleans. Especially and admis- sion is adults and school seniors, that includes fans from this who want to see how the Aggies did it. The Tyrol is the only region in Km ope where Germans BROKEN ARROW. Okla Feb nation's federal' association financed in agricultural im- provements in 1945. the largest total since 1839, G. C. Shull. pres- ident of the Wichita Federal Land bank, said tndav. r defeat treated better since the than during the war. Alcidc de Gaspcri of Jlaly. Read the Ada Want Ads. ther's plenty o' mon- ey o' suckers thesa days, but th' bubbTe is t right in your face if you don't watch out. No, th boss o' th' family seldom maintains 'n office er place o' business down- she's got a huj- t' If   

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