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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             A Kansas tKot a frienj of hi. rfroYe out farm aw WEATHER Cloudr and continued mild to- niRht; Tuesday generally fair. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 207 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1946 Hereford Heaven's Program Adds Tour To Year's Schedule Bill Likens of Flying L Ranch Elected President To Succeed Patterson; H. H. Tour Likely in Early June Bill Likens, owner of the Flying L Ranch at Davis, was elected president of the Hereford Heaven Association at a meeting attended by 21 persons at the Aldridge hotel Sunday afternoon. Likens replaces Moss Patterson, owner of the Lazy S Ranch near Ardmore, as head of the organization. C. C. Buxton, Jr., was chosen M.. first vice president and Francis If a II All If I manager of the Colvert VQllGY VI6W Ranch of Mill Creek, is the new "I second vice president. Outgoing vice presidents arc Uill Likens and Hoy Turner, owner of. the Turner Ranch of Sulphur. Directors Also Chosen Members of the board of direc- tors include Roy Turner, W. A. View Meeting Set All Members Invited To Tuesday Discussion Of Problems, Ideas, Plans (Gus) Delaney, Jr., Dr. R. E Cowling. Mos's Patterson, Dr. Ralph Clark. R. G. Powell, Har- mon Ebey and Jack Smith in ad- dition to the executive officers i of the organization. you nr Al Darle.w. he-ad of the Okla- H.re tnivanl alley ,ew heispital homa A. and M. college animal i ti-.p last months? j husbandry department, is expec- I. so vua have indicated inter- ted to return to the United Sta- A POW Comes Home FIVE CENTS THE COPY The old American destroyer Stewart, which was captured and used by the Japs for 45 months before end of the war, is pictured back home In Pearl Harbor after its "liberation." The ship suf- fered a direct bomb hit at Java in February, 1942, which damaged It so badly that demolition charges were set oft to sink it. The fvaKcd u ,March> il scrvcd as the Jap imperial navy until it was recaptured at Honshu, Japan. Note Jap _________flag on side of ship and Jap double funnel. fhl. Continuing welfare of tes early in March to resume his tha. institution and vou have a duties at Stillwatcr and his Here- crxnce to find out what the situ- fore Heaven secretarial duties to ation of the hospital is now in which he was spital these unsettled postwar months. A_ meeting of the membership nf Valley View hospital has been which he was reclectcel. Vote II. II. Tour The group voted to hold a Here- ford Heaven tour and scheduled 11 ............I 11 si-iir c.I.rd for liu-rday. j-t-bruary 20. it tentatively for June 6 ;i at 4 e, clock at the Aldridgp hotel. incrnbor.-.hip includes all who have contributed a dollar or more toward the funds which an- nually make it possible for Val- ley View to carry a heavy load of charity work along with the pay patientr. All of these members arc invit- ed to attend the Tuesday meeting, v. r.c.-e they will learn "what sort End extent are the problems Val- ley View, along with hospitals everywhere else, are having to deal with in these times. And they will have an oppor- tunity to ask questions, to offer :deas and suggestions, for it is an open discussion meeting that the directors feel membcis will find informative and interesting. Watters to'falF On-Job Program Will Diieuij Over KADA Questions Vets Have Asked About Training Program J. B. Watters. who is chairman rf tr.e committee here which has been taking the lead in arrang- I ir.g the on-the-job program for vetorar.5. will be on the air to- night f Monday i over Station KADA with information about th" program. He will dc-.-otc most of the 15 rnmutc period from to o'clock to answering which vet- rrar.s have been asking him and other of the committee The tenir will be separate and apart from the annual Oklahoma Hereford Breeders Association's annual tour, although, the Here- ford Heaven group agreed to par- ticipate in the state tour if of- ficials of the state organization request that this area be a part of the tour. Formal invitations will be sent to hundreds of breeders and oth- er interested persons requesting that they attend the two-day tour It was suggested that persons at- tending the Hereford Heaven tour womd want a chance to look over each ranch and the cattle raised there. A committee composed of C. C Buxton Jr.. Jack Smith of Lazy D, Jim McClellan of the Turner Ranch, Francis Hill of the Colvert Ranch and George Powell of the J. K. Powell Ranch were selected to make arrangements for the Hereford Heaven tour. Sales Dates Discussed The matter of the Hereford Glencoe Officers Kill One Of Men Trying to Rob Bank Sheriff and Deputy See Men in Building, Return Fire As Robber to Flee; Bandit May Have Been Joplin Man GLENCOE, Feb. man was killed in a Run battle .with officers as two or three men attempted to rob the Glencoe State Bank carlv todav. sbout the progra.-n whereby they ret government aid in nay while the sente Jcurning a tracie or skill. program has assisted in _ pidcinc several dn.-rn veterans al- rrnny and n recognized over tiie as being nmonfi the most effective. Wasters' talk u ill cover most most numerous questions by ex-service men want- ing to get into on-the-job train- THREE REGIONAL GAMES AT BYNG Regional tournament basketbaJl games will he Thursday night at Bvng with winners going to Shawr.ee tr> the remain- der of their games there, ac- cording to K. Jf-cre-tarv the State? Athle- In Cl.-.s.s C'. Mrl.ish hoys will Ashcr at 7 in., Byr.g will meet New Lima at 8 p. m. and Byng meet Bowlegs" at in Class B. All games be played Thursday. Two Wapanucka teams'and Coalgate will meet opponents in '.iie Durant Regional meet. Wapanucka girls will meet p. m. Thurs- Wapanucka bovs meet T-jfhka in a C "game- at r> :n and plays Stonewall in Clars B at" 5 (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Charges U.STAnd Britain Trying To Squeeze Out Russia WASHINGTON', Feb. Wi former military government official contended today that an .-ittempt is being made to freeze Hussia out of a search for Ger- man assets in such countries as bpam and Argentina. Tnc contention was voiced to e sente war mobilization sub- committee by Russell A. Nixon former acting director of the eli- vision of investigation of cartels and external assets office of mil' itry government in Germany." Befe.rc the war Nixon was Washington representative of the CIO United Electrical Workers and has now returned to that post. Isixon told the senators in tes- timony made public today: elements in both the L. S., British and French foreign offices with consciemsly maneu- vering to prevent all four (occu- pying) powers from being in- volved in the search for external assets in the neutral countries be- cause that would lay bare the fascist or reaction-army regimes in countries such as Spain, Portu- gal. Switzerland, Sweden and Ar- gentina and would reveal all the elements eif collaboration of cer- tain interests in the allied coun- February Capping Tame Wealher By Springlike Finish It just hasn't been February this been March with touches of April. Not that the remaining three days of the month couldn't pro- duce some winter, for at this sea- son the weather can alternate from one kind to another at al- most split-second speed. But take Sunday. Many peo- ple here took it as an invitation to get out of the house into open country. The government thermometer says it got up to 76 degrees. In sheltered spots the mercury went on up from there and instead of talking about spring there was a mention of summer, too. Early Monday morning a cool- ing wind blew in briskly from the south but didn't bring along much change, for the tempera- :urc dropped only to 50 degrees before 7 a.m. The wind continued blowing gustily during the day. Urges Decision Now On Merger Proposal Gurney Points Out It's Blocking Congress on Other Pressing Problems WASHINGTON. Feb., 25. Senator Gurney (R-SD) called to- day for early nction on President Truman's proposal for army-navy me rger legislation so congress will know what to do about other pressing military problems. Gurney. a member of the senate military committee, told a reporter he thinks it will be im- possible for legislators to act in- telligently on extension of the draft, universal training, legisla- tion to fix the sizo of the army and navy and the military bud- gets until it disposes of the mer- ger proposal. "We ought to get this thing set- tled one way or the other so that we can go he declared. "There's either going to be a mer- ger or there isn't. Let's find out so we know where we stand.' The man was trapped within the building by Sheriff E. G. Schroe- der of Payne county and his Undershcriff, J. R. Bradley. The sheriff said the man began firing and retreated out the back door, with both officers returning the shots. He was killed about 300 feet from the building. Sheriff Schroeder said a driv- er's license issued to Ralph Davis, 33, Joplin, Mo., was found on the body and a .45 army automatic was nearby. Safe Door Torn Off The sheriff said it had not been determined whether anything had been taken from the bank. The safe door had been torn open but preliminary examination in- dicated the safe had not been molested. The robbers, however, had shot open several lockboxes. Sheriff Schroeder said a glove was found where a car had been parked and he believed one or possibly two other men were in- volved. Schroeder said neither he nor Bradley saw tile other men during the gun duel with the robber. A check of the bank losses was being delayed until federal bur- eau of investigation agents could arrive. Happened About 5 A. M. The robbery occured about 5 o clock. The sheriff said he stationed himself at the front and Bradley at the back after they had noticed someone moving about in the The men had broken through the brick wall surrounding the vault but had not onencd the vault door. They had removed the safe door when officers de- tected them. Schroeder said he saw n man moving about with a flashlight through the hole the vault wall and ordered him to stay where he was. Robber Started Shooting "He began shooting anel I re- turned his fire." the she-riff said. "He ran out the back door and Bradley began shooting at him with a machine? gun. We were both firing when he was killed." Court records at Tulsa listed a Ralph Davis as one of IB defen- dants charged in a federal indict- ment conspiring to violate U. S. liquor laws in Washington county. vt trie's with these regimes. A three-member subcommittee "Such ge-nuine- quadripartite Chairman Elbert D. ALVA. Feb. Alva will r.ild second fat stock March and n with in FFA ;.mi -t-H ,-lub chamber of om- rr.crce :.t the sponsor. Greater returns f. r amount In- News Classified Ads J'WEATHER! Oklahoma Clr-.riy and cein- overturned. rr.thi tonight: Tuesday quadripartite action would completely upset the applecart fen- plans of com- promise regarding Germany's ex- ternal assets in the interest of trade and commercial advantag- es, and in the interest of avoiding the creation of 'toei radical' re- gimes in the future." The witness had further criti- cisms of the way German affairs are being administered. He de- clared: -1- war industry potential ol I. u Farbcn, giant German chemical trust, has not been elim- inated as it was ordoicd to be 2. Nei dccartolization law been promulgated. 3. The denazification program is incomplete. Nixon told the senators that Trial of the case was set for a term of court opening March 4. Weeding Out Jap Nationalists Slow Thomas (D-Utah) and TOKYO. Feb. fVPl _ The Hill (D-Ala.) anel Austin (R-VT) I "f Deeding out ultra-Nation- may reach a final decision this 'roni Japan's caneli- Bombay Back Almost To Normal Now Casuottics in Mutiny At Least 228 Dead, In- jured; Four Probes Begun By G. MILTON KELLV BOMBAY, Feb. al Indian sailors who participa- ted in n mutiny last week have returned to duty, n British com- munique said today, and condi- tions in Bombay arc "practically normal." Strikes have ended at shore installations, dockyards and all but one of the city's 66 cotton mills, the communique said, al- though Royal Indian air force personnel here still refuse to work. A police statement said that road barricades hud been re- moved by recruiting residents of the nrra as laborers, and that only a few minor incidents had been reported. Royal navy ships, including the light cruiser Glasgow, formed a double semi-circle inside the har- bor, and n large force of naval personnel in white shorts and blouses came ashore for unan- nounced assignments. Students Insist On Protest Meanwhile, reinforced British tommies took precautions to make certain that n scheduled demonstration by'studcnts would not cause a new outbreak of vio- lence. No student disorders had been reported by this afternoon, however, and leaders of the con- gress party and the Bombay stu- dents congress urged that the demonstrations be cancelled. Some students insisted, neverthe- less, that they would protest the use of British military forces against the mutineers. At the Largcs hospital here, medical students took care of their regular ward duties, but stood in doorways during their off hours to protest against the establishment of a post of Brit- ish troops on the hospital grounds. At Least 228 Killed A British army communique tonight said latest figures on civ- ilian casualties admitted to hos- pitals since the beginning of the disturbances totaled 218 killed and injured. Other sources said the toll was much greater, however, and might never be known.  mic rehabilitation of China and provide a basis for development of an effective military force- capable of safeguarding "national security. It provides for a force consist- ing of armies of three elivisioi Definitely, we will try to run the subways and other transit facilities." Plea Made To Murray by Mayor William ODwyer for help in averting the threatened walkout rested in the hands of CIO Presi- dent Philip Murray. The mayor in a" telegram last night asked Murray to use his "position and influence'1 to avoid. a tie-up which, O'Dwycr said would result in "grave injury to the people of the city of Now ork and the cause of" organized labor." Wacc Increase "Just Cause" O Dwycr added, however, that 'we cannot anel will not recognize any organization as sole and ex- clusive bargaining ascnt for all civil service employes." He said he had been advised by the citv's corporation counsel that such re- cognition would be a violation of stale laws. The demanded wage increaso was viewed by O'Dwycr as a "just Earlier. Murray said he had "no comment whatsoever to make" concerning the situation, but in a conversation with O Uwycr early- last week ho professed willing- ness to explore the possibilities of preventing a strike. Murray, who is in Washington. h.id been expected to come today, presumably to discuss the matter, but I IVevsmati. gen- eral counsel for the CIO, said nei- Uier the union chief nor any of Ins deputies planned to do so Law Limits Recognition Meanwhile, the Ttt'U had no- tice from O'Dwycr that the citv could not under law meet TWU rights for 3J.OOO civil service transit workers. The transportation employes operate subways, buses, streetcars and elevated lines the munici- owned Unified Transit svs- TWU. headed bv Citv Councilman Michael J." Quili seeks a dily wage increase for all employes. Quill offered tt> step out of negotiations person- ally if it would help achieve a settlement of issues at stake. tem. The OKLAHOMA CITV. .Fob 25 regents for higher" ed- each, with service troops to i today were breaking; exceed 15 per cent of their total allocation of S1..109.003 to the University of Okla- homa school of medicine and hos- pital. The money will be apportioned for various additions and im- strength. Eight Service Areas China was divided into eight service areas under directors re- sponsible to the minister of nat- ional defense, or the national military council. Earlier today reports circulat- ing in Chungking political circles said U top ranking generals n n d petitioned Generalissimo provements. fused to halt reduction. In Shanghai several thousand young Chinese staged a noisy de- monstration al the Russian con- sulate genenil. They se-ale-el the consulate doors with bright color- ed posters which demanded that the Russians pet out churia. of Man- HUGO. Feb. Huskcy, for several vears stale game ranger for the Choi-taw area, has resigned to re- turn to his Flying V much near ind improvement of light and power system. city's WALTERS, Feb. redecoration and repair job on the district court room of the Cot- ton county court house has be-on completed. Other parts of the court house will be repaired later. ITH' PESSIMIST 117 n.h Jr. Did you ever notice how quiet In' fellers who talk sa big downtown git as they near home? Oather Harp, who opened, a closet door yisterday an' fergot t' run. is reported some better t'day.   

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