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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             (.rncrally fair tnnlchi and Satur- day; lirrommc cloudy Sunday, licht rain Sunday .southeast. 2fil THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Sulphur Takes HOW Cherry Tree Tale Began Early Lead In Speech Meel Entrants Show Well In Clou B; College-Sponsored Tourney Ends Saturday A !a.-ce number of high school and individuals are taking .T! :n the invitational and debate tournament at Kast Central State .'..cgp Bv noon Kr'iday some of the 15 cnnte.-ts had been con- others were in thc He onlj H.imjiirf This Kvrning ,i hannuct evcn- Kr.igl.t tin- finalists sneaking will com- :n tli.-jt field. boys Kldnn Siymour. City Northeastern. T' Hammonds of Scminole Miller. qirK divi- arc .Julia Hevctn and Ha.-.MTi of Sulphur and Kvi !v.n .lolmron of Purcell. S.iV.irday mnrninir the late rounds of debate will be carried finals I! Parson Wceim' Story One Poor George Washington Has Never Lived Down Va.. Keb rr'.i'T' "T Gc'OI'ge Washington' birthday is probably a bad time to bring this up, but in the opin ion of the George Washington Boyhood Home Restoration Inc George didn't cut down tha cherry tree at all it." This hit of historical heresay has been provided by the newly- I formed organization for rcbuild- I ing Washington's home at Kerry across the Rapnahan- jnock river from Fredcricksburg the basis of Parson Weems' I biography of the father of our country. Parson Weems is the one who started all this cherry tree busin- ess. And ay or Karachi, and said the number of mutinous Indian ors was "rather less than 'Phone Workers Plan Walkout Government Offers Aid in Adjusting Grievances; Board Orders General Strike of 17 Affiliated Unions March 7 MEMPHIS, Tenn., Feb. nation's or- ganized telephone workers girded today for an indu paralyzing walkout on March 7 as the government offered its aid in adjusting grievances. Thc executive board of the National Federation of Tele- h phone Workers last night ordered a general strike of the 17 affiliated unions which have filed strike notices. The walk- out is effective at 6 a. m. (each time zone) Thursday, March sai- FBI Reveals How If Whipped Axis Fifth Column Here cities and towns left 'in ashes by near future, the nazis, was thc Germans' own product. This captured film was presented in evidence before the international military tribunal by the Soviet prosecution. con- princi- JJlillUi- Pies and the principles of respect lor the indennmlnnno and rights First to Use Oxygen In Treating Disease in o n' s Last Dispatch? BOMBAY. Feb. I' Tins may be till- ArMH-iated dispatch Bombay YOIIK. Pa.. Feb. Dr George K. Holtzapple. who made medical history (il years ago In- saying the iiic Of a pneumonia Miffeicr through use of oxygen, died today. He was 83 if 'u Was, bat'k Holtzapple devised without been r the independence of small peoples. "The consistent defense by the Soviet delegation of t h principles of democracy and dependence of small and the proposal the Soviet delegation dance with those aroused s h a r from Bevin. Such c ill- countries, advanced by in accor- principles, P opposition a position of By BRACK CURRV WASHINGTON. Feb.. 22. Amid international anxiety over atomic bomli spying, the FBI dis- closed today how it fought and licked the axis wartime fifth col- umn in America. The FBI maintained its stoniest silence on the part it is now P'ayjnR RH-'irdinR the secrets Moving to meet the crisis, the Jntish- announced that an ad- mced headquarters of t h e outhern Indian command had ieen established in Bombay with Ccn. R. M. M. Lockhart in supreme command of all roval ndian navy, army ami air forces i the Bombay area." Lochart will broadcast tonight to naval personnel, thc British (In London. Prime Minister Attlee told commons "the mu- tineers have been told that only unconditional surrender will be accepted." He said that "order in India" and that ships of the royal navy, in- cluding a cruiser, were "proceed- ing to the scene ajid will shortly Bomber Squadron Arrives Two small British naval ves- sels meanwhile, steamed into Bombay harbor and a squadron of planes, apparently bombers, flew high overhead. Mutinous Indians retained con- trol of 10 small warships anchor- ed in the harbor. However, at tlnwn today when they were fly- the "cease fire" flag. British reinforcements, includ- ing heavy artillery, were rushed In Bombay as the rioters surged through the streets in the second day of large-scale disorders A 9 P. ni., curfew was imposed. Reut- Fresh Labor Problems Are Bobbing Up No Indications of Settle- ment of Mqjor Strikes, Others Looming for Spring By AfiorUlrtf Prm Government officials, busy at- vcry tempting to end current strife on the industrial front, today faced fresh labor troubles which" threat ened disruption of the country' telephone service and work stop pages in vital industries. The labor picture was gloom as continuing labor disputes ken idle an estimated 970.000 with ni indications of immediate settle incut of the major strikes. Tin number was the lowest in moix than a month but .new contro versies appeared Hearing a heai; in the telephone, electrical, coa and shipping industries. A strike affecting 250.000 tele- prone workers has been set for March 7 by the National Feder- ation of Telephone Workers' Ex- ecutive board. However, the in- dependent union officials said they will continue to meet with government officials in efforts to settle the wage dispute The 1.500.000 residents in the rich Pittsburgh industrial district IJevm and his colleagues at the assembly naturally could not but fail to create a negative attitude among the broad democratic cir- cles in various countries To Distract Attention It was imperative that be hurried to Bevin." The King statement was de- clared intended for this purpose help more lh-'lt Dr. the treatment tf.at it had returns amount m- f .vews Ads JWEATHERJ fair to- and Saturday; becoming Sunday, light rain Sunday J continued mild; low'. nortli. -15-50 knowledg een used H years earlier in New k His patient was Fred Ga- ble of Logansvillc, Pa., who still lives. To aid breathing, Dr. Holtz- apple administered oxygen he generated with a bucket of water an alcohol burner and other crude equipment. Gable's face turned from blue to pink and his respiration was reduced from 80 to within 20 minutes. "I was so excited I thought I would have a fit." the country doctor -I, years later told a medi- cal society. "Tiu- other folks the room thought a miracle happened." Dr. Holtzapple's method of treatment was used on the late King George V of Kngland when he was stricken with pneumonia. The king sent a letter of thanks to the doctor. Bevin at the assembly. To smooth over the unpleasant impressions created by Bevin. "King took this task upon him- si-If without shame in the selec- tion of (he means he his anti-Soviet campaign t'h c main aim of which was to dis- tract public opinion from breakdown and failures Hntish government at the Piations in had t h c of the United assembly, and simultan- to undermine the growing international authority of the Soviet Union." eously Gen. Hodge Says No fo Russians atomic power. But the im- plication was clear that its guard is up. just as it was in the war's opening days when it destroyed the German and Japanese fifth column. I" ruining axis hopes of a de- structive fifth column shacklinc America s war effort, the FBI uncovered huge caches of wea- pons and explosives which could have been used in a widespread sabotage program. All kinds of maps and photographic materials were seized, as well as short wave radios and code books On December 7. I'M I. within a few hours after attack. Kill agents arrested than Japamsc. Then, anticipating a declara- tion of war by Girmany and Ita- gan arresting other aliens who were dangerous to the nation's security. Beginning January fl, (he FBI began spot-checking the homes and businesses of enemy aliens to determine whether they .yore turning over prohibited ar- ticles as ordered by the govern- Since then. Sri.flRl have been searched, turning up vast stocks of contraband articles. Since thc beginning of World War II. ]fi- enemy aliens have horn ar- rested in the United Slates and rts possessions, including Germans and Japanese. screen atrocity without visible emotion. Soviet prosecution earlier in- troduced a secret German army order which said the na.-.i high command was determined in to destroy Moscow and Lenin- grad even if Russia offered to surrender. The order was signed by de- fendant Col. Gen. Alfred Jodl. former chief of the German high command. "Capitulation of Leningrad or later of Moscow is not to be ac- cepted, even if offered by the enemy.' the order said. "The moral justification for this mea- sure is clear to the whole world "Just as in Kiev, where our troops were subject to extreme t danger through time fuse explo- sions, the same must be expected to :i still greater degree in Mos- cow and Leningrad." Defendant Hans Kritzsche. for- mer German deputy propaganda minister, remained in his cell to- day because of a slight illness. Eisenhower, Men In Hospital Have Joke Karachi Mutineers Give Up At Karachi the Hindustan sur- rendered after she had been uiid- V25 "enters s.ud no Indian sailors were injur- ed, most them s  sloop mutineers had been surrender. F o u A British shore batteries fired on t. after the warned to rounds of heavy naval fire, pre- iy tho Hindustan. ueie heard this morning, t I, e communique added, and stray nded in thc cantonment Train and bus service in Cal- cutta was disrupted by demons- trations in sympathy with t h e striking sailors. Barracks Situation Quiet Reuters said another British communique described thc Mttn- at Castle barracks in Bom- bay. where barricaded Indian seamen shot it out yesterday with "S qU'0t <1Ur'nK lhc Iast (Continued on Pago 3 Column 1) Expects Definite 6M and (10-UAW Answers Tonight DETROIT. Feb.. 22 ing for an end to the 94-day-oId General Motors strike, special Labor Mediator James F. Dewcy said today that he expected to get a definite "yes" or "no" from management and union by mid- night tonight on all issues'in the dispute. Earlier Dewcy told newsmen "I expect the company and the union to reach an agreement on all issues, including wages, to- dav." When today's session of Gener- al Motors and CIO United Auto Workers negotiators recessed for luncheon, Dewey said he had not intended to imply a settle- in-nt of the costly strike might he expected by midnight. The strike has keot pro- duction workers idle at a cost to At the same time, Joseph A. Beirut. 35-year-old president of the independent labor organiza- tion, said the walkout would nationwide and would affect all of the federation's work- ers. "The 33 other affiliated will respect picket lines to be es- tablished by the strikinc ho asserted. Approximately 150.000 em- ployes are represented in the 17 unions directly affected by tha strike call. The other em- ployes of the American Tele- phone and Telegraph company will be affected by picketing. One Picket Enough Beirne told a press conference: As long as one picket remains on a line anywhere in the coun- try we will consider the indus- try picketed and strike-bound." He added: "The forceful re- moval of pickets (through in- junctions) will not in the of strikers constitute the actual removal of those lines." Beirne said he had received a telegram from Secretary of Lab- or Schwellenbach in which the cabinet member said he would "be happy to confer with us." The youthful union official added that he would be in Wash- ington next week. "Seems Inevitable" Earlier Beirne had sent a tele- gram to Schwellenbach and telephone company managment aymg "a strike seems inevitable unless you intervene with some suggested remedies." Edgar L. Warren, director he federal conciliation service, that his bureau "will assistance pot- Carl ton W. Wcrkau of Wash. "Cton. the secretary of VFTW. was named strike secre- ary with strike headquarters emporarily set up in Washing- on. Union demands include a flat 10 weekly wage increase, a ent hourly wage minimum and return to a -10-hour week. I he American Telephone and .elegraph company has offered a flat S5 weekly raise to oper- ators and a to weekly in- crease to other employes. CanadalViFReply To Russian Charge OTTAWA Feb. Canadian cabinet, after a four hour session, was reported to- day to have decided to issue brief reply to Russian the dominion :icted charges government had icted in a manner unfriendly to the boviet Union in its disclosure of a leakage of secret informa- tliem, according to union esti- mates of S100.220.000 in lost wages to date j A Washington dispatch to the funwtances s'u r r o u irfg thi Detroit News today asserted that was expected before week-end. Detailed informa- tion. There was no indication when the reply would be made, but an interim report on the royal com- mission s inquiry into the cir- "A considerable t.a MIRI.TAST I OK KKB. 22-2B Kansas. Oklahoma i Ram snow in north and west por- about .Saturday, rc- f Sunday and and Mi.-Miuri Monday; n moderate to heavy ns.u. eastern .-hrre light, colder Ne- Kansas about Satur- icmriir.rJiT 
                            

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