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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 21, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 21, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             yean. WEATHER Fair tonight and Friday, some- what colder tonisht; lowest 35-40. 42nd 2C3 HE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS E. C Disfrid to World Ban Against Draft For Armies Wins Solons' Backing ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1946 Have Speech Tournament February 21, 22, and 23 Are Dates Set for High Schools Debate Meet High school students from throughout tin- East Central dis- trict and a nunibi-r irom other scha.-.l districts v.vanned onto Good Riddance U' tournamcr.t ;incl speech con- test. p. J. Nabors. director of the collect- speech department, stated tii.it _ advance requests for entry v. ere received from nine class A and six class B Inch "There'll be Rood raid. Bristow ar.d are all strong. C.u.-.-en Bristim- have both first and socfind places in r.i'.K.r.al meets. Bristuw placed in state lust year, and Sem- J.-.o.e has taken ratings in national. Winners in the East Central cr.T.'.csts v.-ill qualify for the state rr.ect in April. If a contest is won by a contestant from a sen -ol o-tsioe the district, highest r.-T.r-.ini: entrant within Kast Cen- tral district will also qualify. Contests will be held in debate, extemporaneous .'peaking. stan- dard and original oratory, ad- reading, humorous an 1 dra- International Ban Develops Support In House Committee Some Would Support Peacetime Draft Only If Other Nations Go Im- perialistic The metal drums in the photo above contain deadly mustard fortunately not needed during- the late war and now being disp, of. They arc shown beinn loaded on .-.v...... being loaded on a train headed for Halifax, where they will be taken out to sea in ships that will be scuttled. Reversal On Beer Licenses Revoked Here Judge Howell Holds Evi- dence Insufficient on Ap- peal from County Court Actions FIVE CENTS THE COPY The following program has b-cn arranged for the tourna- ment Thursday, February 21 public discussion. public dis- cusiion. Friday. February 22 P 00 "and orig- inal oratory, men's radio spcak- :r.r. drawings for address rcad- for extem- poraneous speaking. a.m. Address reading, r-jh.-.r.er speaking. for sub- 3'-cts. in extemporaneous spcak- :nc 1 'fifl oratory. exteinpor- speaking. 2 fH> in hu- declamation, dramatic and pc rtrv. in humorous and dr.-i.-r.atic declamation and in- terpretation of poet.-v. of three ro.ir.tis of debate. Finals In .-fter-dinncr speaking will be r.r.rl at banquet. 30 in radio held c.ver station KADA. S-veral other broadcasts will be arranged for contest winners in olr.er events. Russia Accuses Canadians Of Opening Anli-Soviel Campaign Claims Information of No Particular Value, Asserts Canadian Government Encouraging Anti-Russian Drive LONDON, Feb. frankly admitting that its representatives had obtained "secret data" in Can rounds, ada, maintained the information was "insignificant" and nc cused the Canadian government of fostering an "unbridled anti-Soviet campaign." Harden City Folk Painfully Hurt In Collision of Cars James I.. Delaplain and his daughter, Dorothy, are in Valley View hospital following an acci- dent at p. m. Wednesday on the southwcstcrnniost part of the tc.-prctation of at Lucas Hill Southeast of 1 Ada. A Ford sedan driven bv Billv K. McHurd of 905 East 1 thirteenth and a 1P37 Terraplane driven by Delaplain, of Harden j de- Citv. met head-on, almost molishing the two cars. McHurd was traveling south on State Highway and was on the left hand side of "the" high" Itwn countries, wav when the accident occurred, must "The Soviet military attach, in Canada received from acquain tances among Canadian citizens certain information of a secre character which, however, did not present a special interest to Soviet authorities." the Russian government said in a statement broadcast last night over the Moscow radio. The statement indicated the information concerned radar am; atomic cn.rgy. CharRM Hostile Campaign At the same time, the state- ment said, Russia deemed it "r cessnry to call attention to the campaign, hostile to the Soviet union, which has started in the Canadian press and radio, x x x Uie position up by tin- Canadian government is directed toward the en.juragement of this campaign in the press and radio. It is not compatible .with friendly relatic.-.s between the Saturday, February 23 P 00-: 1-30 four r.-i !.vi- t.f debate. H, pm.-Cla.-s A. one- i.lavr. I IHI. 4 no t plays. (Hi p.m Khmmatie.n round begin and continue :M u mill-is an- determined. C students enrolled in the department and others 1 iVi- had experience or are erve" as chairmen a.-.-i timekeepers for the contests, ir.ri in some cases students will .'ii judges. Nabors said. tr.'.ry blanks have been filed ry trie fullo-.vir.g schools: Class Seminole. Bris- Okeniah, Durant. Cla.-.-en. Central and Capitol Class Ct Uyng. r.-AT.. M..u-l_and Hoi ace Mann. ANOTHER CHANGE IN REGISTRARS Mrs. Crowford Registrar For 1-1; Information On Uclfschcy Address Cor- rected officers reported. The only other passenger in .nic car was his wife. They were enroute to the home of some of her relatives who live near Tupelo. Delaplain suffered a crushed left It g and his daughter receiv- ivl laceration.'! and bruises about the body in addition to a bad head laceration. He is imploved the Carter Oil Co., at Harden Highway Patrolmen Haywood Hailey anil Si Killian investigated the collision and :aid that char- lies would be filid against Me- know t h e A 5'cnr.d change is announced :r.e L.-t of registrars in Ada fnr the conung city cli-ction (if March Ir'. in V.'AHD 1. PRECINCT I. the is .It-sit- Rogers Crawford. 12! Fourteenth. of M.-f. Lottie Braly. has b-cn anno'jnred earlier this'week J. E. county regis- not Ihursday afternoon what cha es would h e. OKI.AIIOMAN KILLED RUSSELLVILLE. Ark. Fob 21. '.y-CIaude Owens, 55. of Husscllvillc was killed and three oilier persons were injured ser- iously m ;m automobile collision on highway 6-1 near here last r.ight. In Hired were R. F. Walker 22 of Chaffee. Mo.; George Mat- 50, of Tulsa and Heavener, Okla.. and Jack James of Tulsa. I hey were brought to a hospital here. statement continued, "that the the above mentioned unbridled anti- Soviet campaign was part of the plan of the Canadian government and is aimed at inflicting politi- cal harm to the .Soviet Union Attache Recalled The statement, later handed to the Canadian charge d'affairs in Moscow, asserted that the Soviet military attache in Ottawa was recalled as soon as "the above mentioned activities of certain members" of his staff became known to the Russian govern- ment, because of the "inadmiss- ibility of those activities. The .statement said the Soviet ambassador and other members of the embassy in Canada had no connection whatsoever with the matter." Dispatches from Ottawa said the Russian miiltary attache. Col Nicolai Zabotin. left the domin- ion capital some time ago. Canadian Says "Politics" A I' a n a d i a n government spoKcsman in Ottawa declared the Russians were making "poli- tical capital" of the affair. "The Soviet he said, "started out as an admission of guilt sufficient to cause with- Truman said today he did not believe it would be practical to try to abolish peace- time conscription throughout the world. He expressed this opinion at a news conference after he was told the house military affairs committee might propose such a plan before acting on the presi- dents request for universal mil- itary training legislation. The conscription prohibition has gained strong support in the committee. j Growing favor for the ide came to light as the committe neared the end of three month of hearings on legislation for universal military training pro gram for the United States Chairman May (D-Ky.) to! reporters the committee would take no action on universal train mg bills until it has considered a separate proposal urging the president to use his influence to bring about an Internationa agreement outlawing peacetime conscription. Hearings Are Set This proposal was introducer last year by fit p. Joseph Mar- tin. Jr.. house republican leader and will be the subject of com- mittee hearings tentatively set for next Wednesday. Martin said at the time he in- troduced his resolution that he (Continued on Pago 10, Column 1) Unemployed in Ada Area Gains, Most Registrants Vefs ,1 ,nu'Tlbpr "t unemployed in T Jia Iocal "ff'ce area of the United States Employment Scrv- cc is increasing daily, according 0 James T. Evans, acting man- ager. There were 2040 applicants seeking jobs in January com- pared to 971 in December. Mostly those registering for obs now arc World War II vct- 'rans. Reports reveal that the lumber of women seeking jobs s on the decline. Likewise, lacemcnts declined in January omparcd to December, but the ndications are that there will be n increase for February. 1 A-VC1'S- recently dis- hdrged from the armed service nd a former employe of the mployment service at" Seminole s the new manager for the Ada ical office. Mr. Ayers takes the lace of Robert P. Wood, former manager who recently resigned to enter business for himself. A U. Fence is the local employment service? veterans representative tniplo.vers are urged to make use of the employment service facilities by placing their re- quests for various types of work- VV'l L-ey with 1 14 .East I2th. Bob Howell. district judge rom Holdenville who hold s ourt in both Seminole and iughes counties, found evidence n open court not sufficient for he revoking of license to sell beer in the case of J. M. Des- mond, who operates Smokey's Place on South Stockton, the case was heard in district court Wednesday afternoon. The judge ordered that the beer license be. restored for a period of 30 days in order to en- able the defendant and licensee to demonstrate to the court that Pjacc 's run properly, and that the expiration of 30 days or when Judge Howell is back in Pontotoc county, a hearing will be had to determine whether the order should be made perman- ent. Heard On Appeal In county court recently the license was revoked, but the case was appealed to district court il was hpnrd Wednesday. The order of the county court was reversed by the action of Judge Howell. who said that the place should be allowed to open and operate for the period of 30 days after which time the court will make a permanent order of the matter. Judge Howell further ordered that the license issued to Des- mond to sell 3.2 beer should be restored and that the license should be pending for further liearmg. The legal document had the H. of County Attorney Vol Crawford, who explained that he only saw to it that the document was written as ordered Testimony Of No Trouble Some city employes were put on the witness stand and testi- '9d that 'hey had had no trouble with the place in question. In another similar case in con- nection with the North Pole, a icer license was restored to Indian Naval. Seamen Turn Guns On Bombay As Battle Rages On Shore Close By British Troops Besiege Group In Caslle to Quell 'Mutiny' 'No Connection7 O. .N. The Soviet government says the Russian ambassador, G. Zar- oubin, and other members of the embassy in Canada "had no connection whatever" with the atomic leak matter. The Soviet military attache in Ottawa was recalled by his government. Nine Warcraft Held by Strikers Maneuvered Into Positions Along Shore; British Navy Sends Reinforce- ments to Crush Revolt; Another Clash at Karachi By MILTON KELLY BOMBAY, Feb. troops and striking seamen of the Royal Indian navy battled near the Bombay waterfront today while ware-raft of the mutineers maneuver- ed in the harbor. Bloody civilian riots broke out in the heart of the city tonight. Police fired repeatedly on street mobs after failing to break them up with laths. Spectators said there were manv casualties. Three street cars and buses were halted and set afire .Ir. Lacey, who will operate the place. Most Offices Here To Close on Friday Washington's Birthday Means Holiday for Banks, Draft Board, Other Offices or telephone Ada, 15B3. at Oklahoma (Continued on Page 10, ,'olumn 3) Missing Dog Is Pet of Soldier Who Fought Out of Jap Trap Cur.-ect information on the ad- rf5f rf E. E. Ucltse-hev. WARD started Tuesday r '.veer ir a 20-dav Orraf-r lefj.-r.s fur amount in- t.-tcr. .Vtws Ad.. {WEATHER} tonight and rorr.e-.vhat colder tonight; Jty.vi-5: 25-40 e.xcr-pt upper 20's ir. rr.-.ld terr.pcraturcs missing from the home of Mr. anil Mrs. Paul Selders, Owl Creek, nor a pet. The animal belongs to a son-in- law wlio fought with the First Cavalry in the Philippines and at one time boldly fought his way out of a Jap surrender trap The flog was acquired by Lt. T. E. Price Jr.. when she was a small puppy, was mascot for the ath Regiment of the First Caval- ry, Second Division, at Ft. Bliss for more than a year. Wandered Away Recently When the division went o'ver- feas Lt. Price sent her to the small son of the Selders to be cared for until he came home. The Selders took her to their farm eight miles south and miles cast of Ada. adjoining the L. P. Carpenter ranch. There the pel remained for two years until recently when she- followed some other dogs away. As Lt. Price is due home soon, Mr. and Mrs. Selders are anxious to locate a reddish tan also, the Selders boy has cried bitterly over the absence of the beloved pet. Anyone knowing about the dog is asked to notify Mr. and Mrs. Selders. Stonewall. Roufe 1. Price Acted Boldly Lt. Price, on Luzon, walked on into an enemy camp in the wilds and talked ten minutes with a J; p colonel in an effort to induce him to surrender his men. he saw he wasn't suc- the colonel ordered two holes dug, perhaps for graves for him and his hurled his steel helmet at one of three officers, shot a guard in the stomach, shot the other two officers and sprinted back for the iank lines under file. He scoot- ed through a coconut grove for 200 yards, across a camote field, dropped below the river bank and crawled back to his lines. Former Adan Dies In California City Mrs. Miranda Thompson Resident of Pontotoc Coun- ty 35 Years, Until 1922 Mrs. Miranda E. Thompson, 76, resident of Colton. Calif., for the past 18 years but previously a citizen of Ponlotoc county for 35 years, died in a San Bernardino, California hospital Tuesday, Feb., Funeral services were held the following Friday with burial in Hermosa cemetery in Colton. Mrs. Thompson was a native of Jasper. Georgia. She and Mr. Ihompson lived in or near Ada for .15 years, the last six in the Jones Chapel community before moving to California in 1924 Surviving arc the husband. Joseph N. Thompson; a sister, Mrs. Mary Cowart of Copperhill, Tenn.: two brothers. Ross Tatum of Allen and Mart Tatum of Ada- several nephews and nieces, in- cluding Mrs. Neva Deyoc and Mrs. Bertie Hays, living in Cali- fornia. There was a time when it was up to George to do George got it done. And now, about 150 years later, are still honoring ueorge Washington for what he did. and on Friday, his birthday, Ada will do a considerable amount of observance of the oc- casion. The schools, of course, will be open and busy, but are givinc special attention to the day But local banks, postoffice employment office, most citv and county offices will be closed for the day. The postoffice will operate only on in distribution of mail to boxes, special deliveries and dispatching of mail. The selective service office will also remain closed for the LITTLE CHANGE IN WEATHER JUST NOW Fnit Little change in Oklahoma's springlike weather is seen through tomorrow in the federal forecast. The only change, the weather bureau said, will be a shift of a high south wind into the north, but even that will not affect tem- peratures much. The mercury will stand about 40 over the state tonight, except in the Pan- handle where it may reach 35. The wind will decrease tonight. Frisco Tulsa-Texas Train Back On Night Schedule Soon It'll be like old times on the Frisco schedule through Ada be- ginning March 1 when the train that used to be a night train and for some time has had to operate on a daytime schedule because of ODT wartimes restrictions goes back to the niqht schedule. The Tulsa-Ada train remains on practically the same schedule. The change will affect the Tulsa-Fort Worth train, which will again be able to use Pullman cars. Beginning March 1 it will leave Tulsa at p.m., arrive in Ada at a.m., reach Dallas ;it T a.m. and Ft. Worth at a.m. (Under the present schedule it leaves Tulsa at p.m.. arrives in Ada at p.m., in Dallas at 10 p.m. and Ft. Worth at Coming north, the train wil leave Ft. Worth at p.m.. Dalla at 11 p.m., arrive in Ada at 4 a.m. at Tulsa at a.m. (At presen it Ft. Worth at p.m. Dallas at 4 p.m., arrives in Ad; at B p.m. and at Tulsa at The ODT on Feb. 15 cut th  British conservative leader would mention Russia in his Missouri speech. OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb.. 21. struck at the gover- nors office today for the second time in a week when Ralph Trask, private secretary to Gov. Robert S. Kcrr. was rushed to a hospital with pneumonia. member of the Indian party working committee, was reported to have offered his ser- vices as a mediator to Col Sir John Colville, governor of Bom- TH' PESSIMIST bay. A Reuters dispatch said one (Continued on Page 10, Column 1) British soldier was killed and 14 persons wore wounded in an ex- change of fire at Karachi between military police and striking sea- men aboard the Hind- ustan. The seamen were report- ed to have sent out the ultima- urn: "If our demands (including vithdrawal of troops from the harbor area) are not conceded by 0 p. m. we will open fire on tiic military." The principal armament of the Hindustan, whose 120-man crew struck yesterday, is two four-inch guns. The Karachi incident was reported to have started when military police fired on a launch (Continued on Page 10, Column 3) i read a letter frura a relative before Roin' out fer th' cvenin', if you expect t enjoy yourself. Th' pained expressions those seated around, a ban- ouet table ain't nllus due th' lot o' 'em 're whut t' do about whut's under the'r lower plate.   

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