Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 19, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 19, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             CM. mony ho, been poured ou, employe, prie. WEATHER Clear to partly cluudy this after- norm, tonight anil Wednesday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Ford Invited To Reply To OPA Charges Bowles Colls Young Henry's Request for Price Increase 'Outrageous' WASHINGTON. Feb.. I'l. The hourr- banking eommitt'e to- tiay H'-nrv Ford. II. to of new Chairman Spence an- nounced Ford would be'called .'-'Pi'c-entative Crawford i to .-m l-.e OPA had made upon now directing "Crl n' r id Motor company. f> H. D Buffet:   said that ''t-'MOtcd "to brow- I ..jr. f-oid" in public state- l'-1-'H' nged its author- I Ch'-ter Bowie-. OPA chief and r.-.-. iv economic stabi- j m the to fal.-e or! "Outrageous." Howies witne.-s bcfor? the ADA. OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19IG U. S. Newspaper Becomes Jap Souvenir FIVE CENTS THE COPY NFTW Head Confident Of VI IM I) Opened in Ada V ore For Nation-Wide Strike Gene Ford Has Office In Federal Building, Ready For Assistance ".mir.ittcc- th, ls. .i.-.'.-.n to OPA's life had that tile Ford com- J-..nv last yun-.m.-r lecnu-.-tcd a 55 r-er rent for cars over ..'.e p, itt. of j.- j Tins an outivagcotis in- a.s'K. ,c) Bi.v.ies -i v.-i-.a: if "'rjrC V'n' r" ci'ntrol." Patman (D- Tt-x.. r, Bowie, for a st-.tc- on young Kurd's reported th.at OPA was hold- :-C UD c.-oduction of automobile1- ny !t> pnlicv. Patman vounc Kord had Mated his I 5300 on each YotitiT I.ravcs Traditiun Bov.l..-- eommitt-c "I fiont t.'ijni; t :e (for a j  i H plan I'. foimula for f..i the c immit- 'a. nil contiol, i-M-eut rent- t .-nuai-lv can br- ,K-xt Rt-p. V. olcott rank- said lie i'.ie gradual but forced OPA One Year Ago Today Iwo Jima Beaches Stained by U. S. Blood Today Navy Plane Strewi Frcih-Cut Flowers Over Gravei Of U. S. Marines Who Died in Bitter 36-Day Struggle i; PEARL HARBOR, Feb. off Iwo Jima was thunderous with the pulsating shock of American guns on this date in 1945-and the bottomless black sand of I he beaches soon was touched with the color of American blood. Today the thunder came from the powerful engines of naval transport plane, sent from Pearl Harbor to strew the color of fresh-cut flowers over the thousands of U. S ma- rine graves. In Pearl Harbor, marines gathered simultaneously for a memorial mays arranged by veterans of the Third, Fourth I-ifth divisions, which lost 4.189 dead in the bitter 36- light for the tiny volcanic i s la nd on the air route to lokyo. Many thankful B-29 airmen later acknowledged that American possession of the isle-made into an emergency landing field for damaged superforts-had saved their lives P. T. Lunquest. manager of the Veterans Administration Center at Musk-ogee, announces the opening of a Contact Unit, which is located in Koom Federal Building, in Ada. F. E (Gene) Ford, a native of Ada who has been taking train- ing for this work in Muskogec for sever.-il months, is contact repre- sentative on duty at the office here. Office Open Daily The office will be- open daily from 1, a.m. in. eluding Saturday The mailing address is. Conta-t Unit. VA. .'101 federal Building, Ada. It is duty to fti-nish general information as to benefits and services provided by the laws administered by the Veterans Administration and such specific information as will make po-sible the development of the partial- ar issue or issues involved. Also He will assist former members of the military or naval service in the preparation of the for r.s and documents necessary to make or support claims for benefits or compensation. Service In Itcncfit Claims The office will provide service in matters relating to compen- sation, pension, insurance, hos- anil medical care domiciliary care, vocational re- habilitation and employment As a mutter of course, these bene- fits are provided federal laws and are extended to veterans and their dependents who meet the requirements of said laws. In addition to the contact ser- vice rendered by a personal call at the office, those who desire as- sistance may. when practicable call by telephone or mail their inquiries to the office Bombay Rioters Tear Down, Burn U.S. Flaq; Protest Due l.'inai'er of tin- Reporters Told Demonstrations Not Anti-American Bur Americans Should Quit India; Sergeant Mob HO.MBAV. Feb. lit. -A mob nt Indians, including a num- ber wearing the uniform of the royal Indian today tore tin- United States flag from the U. S information service office here and burned the flag in the street. I Walter D. S h a ck 1 e t o n. in charge of the office, said he had informed the American consul- ate and Ralph principal public affairs officer of the U S I. S. at New Delhi, and that he was awaiting instructions con- cerning filing an official protest to the Indian and British gov- crnments. Shaekleton said that about .100 demonstrators who were march- ing in the street suddenly swarmed up to the U. S I S office where the United 'states 1 ag flew from a pole just over the door of the agency's library man climbed' onto the shoulders of another man and tore down the he said. i I'srd Paper As Torch j "They ran around the corner with the flag and when they fail- i ed in their efforts to set it afire with matches they obtained a newspaper, lit the paper and usjd this a torch to burn the flag, Shaekleton said. i He said an unidentified Amer- j lean sergeant, who had a jeep I parked near the U. K. I. S. bead- quarters, was hit on the shoulder with a shovel and clubs in the hands of some members of the mob, but he leaped into the ve- hicle and escaped, apparently wmiimt serious injury. The mob stormed down Horn- by Road, stopping with military trucks and other vehicles. Some of the demonstrators attacked several British and Indian' of- ficers with clubs, the British army public relations office said. Ihe crowd carried congress par- ty flags and shouted slogans Seamen Making Demands The cause of the demonstra- tion was not clear, but some ob- servers expressed belief it might have started as a manitestation ol sympathy with a sitdown strike staged yesterday by 1.000 royal Indian navy seamen in a demand for better rations and a revision of pay allowances. 1 (A lU-uters dispatch from i Bombay said Mohandas Gandhi I had told followers at a praver meeting yesterday that "India had been looted" and that the government should "exercise greater care" in controlling the conduct of American and British troops. i and American troops came here to fight Gand- hi was quoted as saying. "What Beirne Says Leaders From All Parts of (ounlry Favoring If Federation Has Workers; Settlement of Dispute in Philadelphia Still Hasn't Cleared Prospect MEMPHIS. Ten..., Fob. A. Beirne president of the National Federation of Telephone Workers, announced shortly after noun today that in his opinion there would be a strike vote taken at the ufkrnoon session of the. policy-mapping assembly. large groups all sections of youthf-.il New said, "made "Leaders of th of workers from the country." the Jersey Irishman strong representations in favor of a complete rratioii-wide walkout in the morning "They were greeted enthusias- U-allv by assembly." he add- j ed. "In my opinion a strike move will be taken this afternoon." Beirne did not identify the leaders nor the unions thev rep- resent. Workers At ia End Plans for Strike (Continued on Page 3 Column 3) U. S. Alter 22 Americans Over Wartime Treason This by an a-' requiring of in each industrv r.rn is that produc-tioh .-cache: 7j per cent of nor- fmtnut. Would OPA roinmitti-es indu.try-i i ut A commit-i any disputes to be Set- hv ;r.p emergency court of _. Wolcoi! [u. ani'ndments: ..'.I- before the committee i -o t.-u- price control law b-vor.d it> June ex- ciate 11 j. i 'i liave adju.it- in rent to cncour- icntal supporters bin lion Irs Invited Mack Hr.j-c leader Mc- (Mass.. reporters i i. i-onure.-s got aiotind f) th- (u> ;'iji'' 1" run in The banking committ--e invited Bowles to Hill for cities- in statement ye.ter- that I'lv-nleni 'liu- By BRACK CURRY WASHINGTON, Feb.. 19, Attorney General Tom Clark dis- closed today that justice depnrt- m? nt investigators in Europe are on the trial of 22 Americans sus- pected of wartime treason. Clark told a reporter he plans to send a special emissary to speed the collection of evidence acamst these suspects and six others already indicted for trea- son. Timothy A. .Melnerny, the de- nartmenfs director of public in- formation, will fly to Europe and make a survey of the investiga- tions under way in Germany and other former nazi countries. Melnerny. a former lieutenant colonel on Gen. D w i g h t D ti.senhower's staff, will work with armv intelligence. Not Sloppy Sentimentalists Clark sairl the justice depart- ment -is determined to bring rverv simile American who play- ed the axis came swiftly to trial. No effort will be spared because we must show the world that we are not sloppy sentimentalists where the crime of high treason is concerned. "As soon as evidence has been i obtained." he added, "each of the I suspects will b Another Witness Takes Short's Side On P. H. Warnings H.v J. W. DAVIS WASHINGTON Fcb 10 Col. Walter C. Phillips told'Pearl Harbor investigators today army men in Hawaii before the war believed Washington "would not be so foolish as to withhold vital intelligence from us." Phillips was chief of staff to Mai. Gen Walter C. Short, army commander in Hawaii. In h statement to the scnpte-house committee investigating the- Dec. i. disaster he observed Educators Leave For St. Louis Meet Supr. Morrison on One Panel Discussion or Na- tional Administrators Convention Dog Had Rabies; Registration For (ity Primary Hay Begun-Boswell Health Director Tells What to Do The north after other in that was killed ast Ada .several nights ago it had attacked several dogs and otherwise acted rabies quite the dreaded Officers of the Ki-r-t Central district organisation of the Okla- homa Education Assoclalum left Tuesday for St. l.ouis. Mo., and a convention of the National As- sociation of School Administra- tors. They are O. D. Johns. Seminole Mipermlrndent and president E C. O. E. A.: Hex o Mor- rison Ada superintendent, vie- president, and W. P. Hopper. East Central Slat? college, secretary. Morrison is on the program as one of the men taking part in a panel discussion 'Ihursdav of "Health and Physical Fitness in Elementary Grades." The convention was not held last vear because- of wartime conditions. did not have the hindsight which is now open to everyone Phillips backed up Short's con- lentions: 1. That Washington not send any information which in- i dicatud an attack on Hawaii. Washington did nothing to correct the situation when Short messaged in late November, 1041 that he had gone on an alert only against sabotage. Phillips' stateinent said: "Our encmv intelligence came from Washington. We knew thev had more than they gave us bill we assumed, quite reasonably, that thev would not be so fonli-h as to withhold vital intelligence from us. MessiRrs On Sabotage Only After we alerted to prevent Mrs. N. Russell Dies Early Tuesday i .OKLAHOMA, flea.- 1 alt.-inoi.n. tonight j cold- 'nl temperatures .iav alte: r.oon.' lORKCAST I OR ruij. m-2i Kan-a.-. Oklahoma -mcv.-hat colder _. warmer J again Fri'lav v.. tcin'- :i- i K..H .1 .HIM middle of 5 v. ith toi ni.s m Mi-, nun. oiitbea-.lei n and i-a.-.t.-rn Oklahoma.! will aveiag h.-ivv e.x- ugM to nvidera: m' west -rt and j e--: cxtic.-ne west! v. til m connection with alleged propaganda broadcasts Four Held In Europe Clark said four of llu.se are held by the army in ward Delancv of Olnev 111 Oouglas Chandler nf Haltimore: Lonstancc Diexel of Philadelohia and Robert II. De.st of New York Mv Ilest war. nabbed by army intelligence In Austria last week, t-nderick Kaltenbaeh of Dubu- que. Iowa, is reported unofficial- ly m custody of the Russians Clark said. He added that one of ..lelnerny's tasks will be to negiotiate with Russian occupa- tion authorities in Germany for Kalunbach's release to the 'if S army. Of (hi- others indicted, one is dead, another is missing and Pound i.-. in a Washington C hospital. A federal court' filled last week that he is "men- tally unsound" a n d unable to stand trial. The body of the aulostoma Chinese resembles the skelton of a man. Ibis fish is found in the .southern seas. some other tinmentioncd form of "hostile action." The committee also beard from Col. Robert E. Schukraft, who was m charge of intercepts of Japanese secret messages for th' chief signal officer in the w a r department. Schukraft testified that lie never saw a genuine messar- carrying out a Japanese plan warn agents of war by means of a false weather broadcast. This is Ihe now famous "winds code" Naval Captain L. F. Safford has testified that such a message did come in on December 4. giving Washington a three-day tip-off on the war. Viola Ann Russell, wife! of C. N. RussL-ll. Ada geoloi-ist. died Tuesday morning at a local hospital. She was stricken sud- denly several days ago and her condition was report-d -enous i thereafter. Fun-.-ral services will be held at p.m. tln- Lnswell Funeri'l Chapel, burial in Memorial I Mrs. Russell was born in i Greenville, Tex., in The1 family has lived in Ada lor manv years, however. Surviving are Mr. two daughters. Mrs. W. Stephens ol lexas and Mrs. II. o pm Uashmgton. D. C.: a son. C. H. Russell of Ft. Smith. Ark -is- ti-r. Mrs. Verena Hall o: Dallas Tex.; three brothers. E J and' M. Collingsworth of t. B. Collingsworth of four The U. S. Armv Air Corps hail airplane.-, when the- United States entered World War I The bearded ant of' builds long, swineim; nests ie- scmbling the beard of a j'iant -'is if it might hav, definitely did have I dis-ase. A report from the state labora- .v. to which the dog's head was sent, said that rabies was I pre-eiit. Residents of the neighborhood heie when- the mad career ended have cards say- 1 mg that a dug believed to be the .same one had langed as far dis- i taut as and into the I i I i-can Cirovi- rnmmunitv, attack- some other So- -Dr. K. H. Mayes. director ot the county health unit, advises I that every dog that might have been bitten by the rabies-infect- I ed animal penned up and I watched for period of 10 days I -It a was bitten after the other animal had developed ra- bies In the transmittable stage. Dr. Mayes points out. it will sick- en and die before the 10 day pe- riod is up. And if a person has been bit- ten by a dog suspected of rabies the should IK- penned and watched to see if the disease de- velops and so nceessarv the extended treatment required to save the person's life. Several dogs in northeast Ada known to have been attacked bv the tnad dog are bc-ing destroyed today. Registration began today for the city primary election of March and will continue through a period of 20 dav; ac- cording to J. E. Boswell, countv registrar. Registrars for Ada's 16 pre- cincts are as follows: WARD O.NK Prec I--Mrs. Lottie Uralv, 423 South Hennie. Prec. Lela 523 Kast Kith. Pree. A. Vreeland 817 hast 15th. Prec. Arm- strong. East ir.th. MEMPHIS. Tenn.. Feb. III. f.T> Ihe settlement of the Philadel- phia strike of American Tele- phone workers today removed tnreat of an immediate nation- I wide strike of Long distance op- erators. John ,1. Moran, president of the federation of Long Tele- phone Workers who last night I threatened a widespread tie-up of facilities unless the strike were settled "within 24 hours." remain- ed Hi the policy inciting of the national federation of telephone workers when the settlement an- nouncement was made. Men an expre.-srd satisfaction what he described as "a ten- tative settlement." adding that the issue would not now be hrought before the NFTW. Union Back To Work "The union is to icturn to I he said. "The person who was appointed to the manage- ment position will not assume that position until a complete in- vest igalion by the union and com- pany is made. Both parties will report back their findings to the (ContirmedjMi Page 2 Column U) Ada Grade Schools Praised by City School Coordinator Henry Wallace Sure Trumsn Will Run TWO Prec. 1-J. n. Maloan. iNorth Uroadwav Prec. 'G C H-nris i i Lions Kast 7th. il1 tlll> i Prec. 2-Mrs. Edna La.ater Tues- 525 East Sth. j WARD TIIRKK Lucilc Scott, 30 j. Pree. West 10th. Prec. Sth. Pree. 704 West 7th. WARD FOCK 215 PHILADELPHIA. Feb U. S. Conciliator Peter J Man- no announced settlement of a strike of 1 .000 American Tele- phone Telegraph Co here which prompted tiiiC.ts of a nationwide phoni? tieup. Manno said the company and, representatives of the Fe-Jei .'ion of Long Liivji Telephone Work- ers find.) reached an agi .-ement alter 12 hours of negotiations. J. K. Dingman. supei isor of employe relations for tru- com- pany, said has promised. to investigate the promotion of three employes who the union said were given better jobs with- out regard to seniority rights (jrievaiicn Statement Comine He said the union by Thursday- will give the company a written statement of its gi u-van- i-s and. that the groups will me-jt arain. here next Monday .to discuss the grievances. At that time, reported Dmj- man. if the- eompanv has found that Mrs. Helen Sullivan (non- union member among tb thieo who received promotions) is to retained in her new position the union will accept the finding In. the meantime, he asserted. will not function pending this in- vestigation." Silent On The union contended Sul- livan should not be promoted over union Workers with ccnior- ity rights. Union leaders .na-Jc no immediate comment on the nego- tiations. Father, Son Have Reunion in Tokyo TOKYO. Feb. f.n. ther-son reunion with C. C. Hay. TUO A. Ebrite, 501 West Gene Ba.xley. i ih "'K'lnizaiion lues-1., rcu. f.n. 1-1. day that Ada grade arc I with a r.evv I among the best schools in Okla-I lwisl "iRhlighted Iho visit line homa and offered high lor McKelwav. the teachers working with grade cdltor of Washington i school children. blar. Blakt Greater ri'tuins News lor amount in Classified Ads CI.EVKLANn. Fd) l-i Secret a ry of Conm-erce Henry A. today -rpe'-.-ted thai Mr. Truman 'is going to run for president in 1 and in- i dicated he would not aL-ain be a candidate be- cause it would bi- "necessary to have some from anothir 'part of the coui'try." Askeil at a press conference whelher he might be a candidate I if Mr Truman was not. Wallace [replied: "Hut Truman is going to run." Questioned cone ruing the pos- sibility of IPS nominal ioi, for vice president, the secretary he believed "it would lie necessary In have a candidate from anotheV part of the country a.-: a running mal" tor Tinman. Wallace add-I ed tnat he expected U, remain 111 Ills cabinet post. Head the Ada News Want Ads Week's RaiiTTofal Up to 2.15 Inches It's a real soaking anv line 2.15 inches falls over a 15- hour period and that is what happened here carlv this.weik. Ada got inches in tin- hours ending Monday at 7 a m but the rain continued until al- most noon and of an inch more before the clouds let i i Teniperaturis here remained moderate, with for a Monday maxium and a -ID-degree low for Monday night. OKMUI.GEE. Feb. Ill airplanes and hunters'i from Okmulgce. Tulsa. Creek and likliiskee counties partici- pate in a coyote drive near hen- Sunday. The drive will include two sections of land. _ t____ Head the Ada News Want Ads. school children. i sup. rinten- dcnt of city schools, was scliedtil- ed to give a talk, but was called out of town unexpectedly and asked Miss Kennon. coordinator for city schools, to make the talk Miss Keiinon told Ada grade schools are bein-: nodern- m keeping with the times pointed out that re- sults could be obtained it more room were available in cverv grade school. She said that some grade schoolers have not had iie.-Tk all year because there are no desks available and no space to put the i desks if they could be The principal talk of 'nc pro- gram was closed when Ken- i lion invited the public to attend any grade school Ada and see the Uinctioninc of Ihe schools. Livestock Valne Increasing OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb in Oklahoma decreasing in numbers but creasing in value prr head is in- the Now They're Talking About Jet-Propelled Liners Read the Ada News Want Adi Milk Cows Fewer But Production Up OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb. u reduction in the number of cows on Oklahoma farms in VJ45 compared with 1J-M, milk production increased pounds, K. D. Blood. trop statistician, reported 'Drili-5 JK- __ "u ou.v a u annual livestock report issued the department of agriculture disclosed lodav. Only with hor.ses and Which decreased 5 ner cent in year, and dropned fnnn an avi r ai-e value of Slit a year ago t, this vear. was there both j deelme m numbers and prices I he number of mules and muli clots on Oklahoma farms from KIU.OOO head on Jan 1 year ago to this ytar. The number of cattle and cal- ves on farms declined but then average value per head increas- ed from S51.40 to a head. Ihe number of milk c.iws also de- clined fl per cent, but their value went up from S7D to a head Then- was a sharp increase in I'olh Ihe number and value of a gam of 7 per cent in the pig crop and an average increase of SI a head in llu-ir value. A flourescent lamp requires more than 1000 distinct manufac- turing operations, and is assem- bled from ,'iB separate parts. Tho Sacramento vallev line running 22 miles from the "capital to I-olsoiii. in was Califor- nia s first railroad. j Star. One of three newspaper execu- lives touring the Pacific. MeKel- way made immiries about Irs son. 2nd U. Benjamin McKci- wav. Jr.. 24. ..T'le, lieutenant, stationed at Hakodate. Hokkaido, with the llth airborne division, not onlv was located but turned up in. Tokyo with considerable accu- mulated leave. It was the first time the father and son had seen one another in a year. So thev decided to extend their visit and young Ben will accompany news executives to Korea tomor- row. Afterwards he will return to Japan. KICI-IP NO -I RATION HOOK. IS WARNINC; OKLAHOMA CITY. Fcb _ Joe Mitchell, state ii-. ar rationing office r. housewives today to k.-i p their No. war ration books they probably will need then) .'or a new sugar ration stamp valid .May 1. Mitchell said the current stamp. No. :i'i ,s the ,f the sugar stamps in the No. 4 book because No. 40 was used l--r ning sugar in "It is probable." lie .iddt-d "that the new sugar .stamp will bo one of the spam .-.tam.is :n Iho No. book." TH' PESSIMIST A bath tub is whut you fill up with water an1 git in jest before all your friends de- cide t1 telephone you. Some fellers 're as busy as a moth in a accomplish about as much.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication