Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 18, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             can .prin9 b. fnr WKATHF.B Mostly rloudy. rain except In extreme MiuUnvrM this afternoon THE ADA 200 BUY MORE WAR BONDS Tempers Heal Nation Facing Inflationary lln n.iirllu Says Bowles As He Up QUKkly OH Urges Price Control Extension Pa u ley's Name MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 19-IB r'i Senator Accuses Witness of Not Wanting to Continue For Fear of Incriminating Self WASHINGTON'. Feb. Brewstcr (H.-Me.) I a sharp argument at I'll the Kdwin W. P.'uil- today when he a-k'-d a witnc.-.s if he did not to testifv further "because incriminate yourself." Harold Judson. olicitor general, re- angrily that he resented '.lie statement. E 1 I e n d r ,'D.-La.) broke in tn shout: "Who's on trial P.iuley or Judson." when Senator To boy (R.-N.H.) shotted back that he 'intended to cn ;nto every phase of the activ- ities cf Pauley, President Tru- i rr-.an's nominee for undersecre- tary of the navy. Chairman i D.-Miis.-. i demanded and t'proar Over Statement Trie uproar began after Jud- son had testified that he did not contribute any money to a 1039 California referendum campaign ;n which he attorney for a C.'fjup seeking to prevent the of nn oil conservation Toi -y produced California vhich he said showed Judson war. listed as the sole contributor of S3B0.500 to- ward the unsuccessful fight BCuir.st the referendum drive, which had been launched by in- dependent oil operators. About Report Testifying that he had forgot- ten all about this repoi I. Judr.on i! rcpicsented a "legal fie- tion" inasmuch as the monev was roilrrtecl, turned over to' him he then tinned it over to the committee opposing the rcfercn- Hy FRANCIS M. LE MAY WASHINGTON, Feb.. 1H, Chester Bowles told congress to- day the nation faces an inflation- ary explosion with pressure "up to the bursting point." i But ho declared that President Truman's new wage-price policy is "a program that will work" with "little or no effort" on food, rent or clothing prices if the bul- ge in thc stabilization line is not 1 permitted to become a break- through. "I think it is a good program and I mean to put everything I've got into making it the newly designated stabilization boss said in testimony prepared for the house banking committee. Bowles appeared to urge ex- tension "at the earliest possible moment" of the price control and other stabilization acts now set to expire June 30. He called to for action by congress to "stop the inflation in thc real estate market" if the administration's new homes-for-vetcrans program i Heaviest Rain Of Stale Here All of State Soaked, Wheat' Farmeri of Northwest Jub- ilant Over Rainfall is to succeed. And he said the food subsidy program must be continued. Not Perfect Program The price chief acknowledged that the new wage-price policy 'is not a perfect add- ing that "under the circumstances which we face there can be no perfect program." It would be difficult, he told the committee, "to exaggerate the gravity of the inflationary crisis we face. Everywhere men arc betting on inflation. "A speculative fever has taken hold of the country. The pres- sure in the boiler is up to the bursting point. The lobbyists and profiteers are licking their Stratford Man Dies Under Pickup Truck Suffocated in Deep Mud When Pinned Under Truck After Being Thrown From Cob FIVE CENTS THE COP< More Steel Companies Rush Conferences Steel Workers Return to Work the chops. It is going to take firm and decisive action if we are to hold this country on an even keel. Have Moved Too Fast Reviewing government actions Ada apparently was in the rainiest area of Oklahoma over wmda7 "1KlJl into Monday, with 1.8 inches of rain reported a.m. Monday higher than other reports from over the state The ram continued well into the morning. It fell all night and was accompanied by mild tem- degrees high Sun- ni 'M decree low during the (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) Daughter Of Pioneers Dead A. L. Johnson Of Wilion Daughter Of Founders of Town of Roff in The witness said adversely interested ry's nomination" all about the report. He asked for time to obtain memoranda lie said had been made then. "I resent that statement." Jud- son back. Keep Car Wrecks Pafrolmen Busy Over Pasl Weekend Highway patrolmen stationed in Ada investigated two wrecks Saturday right and S u n d a y morning in addition tn the acci- cont v.-hcre Ray Holland of Stratford was suffociati-d when hr was pinned under his car. A Chevrolet sedan driven ny Fred T. Nral. n soldier, and a 11.14 Chevrolet coupe driven by Uilburn T. Wi.ite of Wvnne- v.-ond. Rnut- 2. collided "three west of Stratford at p. rr. Saturday. Nn.il h.-.d five passengers in <-ar while While was alone, was tiavclmg cast on State Hig.iw.-.v HI and was travel- :r.g -.vest v.-hcn the two ears col- in the crnier of the high-, iv av .-it the top of a small hill. patrolmen investiga- ting the ,-icider.t report that there was no center line nn the black top and there was no evidence ai to who -.'.-ai "in the wrung. ..one of the seven perMms in- volved injured, but both cars -.vrre batilv damaged, both being At a. m. Sunday, patrol- run an two of CoaIKatc on U. S. _ coupe driven bv ried E. Overtoil, a negro ranch ncar Coalgate, and roid ftdan driven by Opie -fgrn. of Stringtown -swiping did   "south- west of Mukden, from "popular local (communist) after having taken Taian and Panshrn in the same area. The communist dishpatch dat- ed Sunday, asserted that the na- tionalist forces were their gams" and that in eastern Jehol province of inner Mongolia troops of the nationalist (tilth di- vision of the I.1th army had cap- tured the two townships of Kwang Vuchuan and Chine Huan-Chih. The official spokesman pointed out, however, that no eom-mmi- que had been issued about the supposed fighting, w h i c h has been reported only by the- com- munist press. Bowles On Air Tuesday NlRlit SHREVEPOHT. La., Feb. lfl._ M electric companie; in the southwest and midwesl have offered to distribute tht electric current output of al government dams in the south- west, Frank M. Wilkes of Shreveport. president of South- western Gas and Electric com- pany, announces. Wilkes said the offer was made in a letter to Douglas administrator of the Southwestern Power adminis- tration, which directs power sales from dams in this area. The distribution system pro- posed by the federal government would duplicate existing facili- ties of the 11 companies and re- sult in ii needless expenditure of by the government. .said. Savings To Public Any savings that would result from sale of the government-op- erated power would be passed on to the public, Wilkes said. The offer came after plans were announced recently by MVI'A to build a wide network of electric transmission lines in Arkansas, Texas, O k 1 a h o m a, Louisiana. .Missouri and Kansas. These federal 1 i n e s, said would duplicate and in many cases run parallel lo lines of present companies. XttTA Asking Funds PA recently asked congress for an original appropriation of t., this and annnimeed plans of SWPA would result ultimately in ex- penditure of Wilkes said. Companies which made the of- fer are: Arkansas Power and Light Co.. Little Rock. Ark Southwestern Gas and Electric Lo.. Shreveport: Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Tulsa, Okla.; Arkansas-Missouri Power Corp.. Hlylhevillc. Ark.: Loui- siana Power and Light Co., Al- gic-rs. La.; Mississippi Power and Light Co.. Jacksnn, Miss.; Okla- homa Gas and Electric Company. Oklahoma City, Okla.; Empire District Electric Co.. Joplin, .Mo Oklahoma Power and Water Co Sand Springs, Okla.; Gulf States Utilities Co., Heaumoiit. Texas' and Kansas Gas and Electric Co.! iclnta. Kansas. Lancaster Industry Operates Normally Despite 'Emergency' General Strike Grips Pcnsylvania City, Argu- ment Over Mayor's Order By ALLAN CKIST LAN'CASTER, Pa.. Feb. a general strike of AH, unions gripped Lancaster and the acting mayor proclaimed a state of emergency, most of Lancaster's industry operated normally today. Henjamin M. Weigand, dent of the Central Labor union which called the strike jvsterdav in support of a 13-day walkout of transit workers, said many of .the AFL members had'not yet been officially notified of the strike and that "the strike Hasn't its peak yet." Daniel W. Coulter, acting mav- 11- in the illness of Dr. Dale Car'v. .shortly before nncin vith city council. No statement vas issued of what transpired. Picket lines were thrown up bv :30 a.m. (EST) around virtually 11 industrial plants, out were vithdrawn later in most cases. Wigand would give reason. Earlier Coulter had ordered 11 policemen away from the car- Kirns of the Conestoga Transpor- ation company because, he said the situation is wholly bevond he control of the police ucpart- icnM" Pickets halted buses and trucks pi-rated by union employes, and Ci icy hound buses were per- littt-d to enter the city About 2.000 pickets "md other 1-L workers milled afuincl the Cimestoga barns early todav and Coulter immediately called upon Sheriff John Pfc-nningi-r for aid He said the sheriff "refused point blank." I'fenninger declared "I Ihink the proper place tn settle any dis- pute is not on the picket line, but at a roiindtable talk." Belgian Vote Is Strongly Rightist, Pro-King Leopold Pomp and Ceremony As Prelates Raised Four Americans Among 32 Made Catholic Cardinals Soldiers Tearing Down Bomb Ranges Staying in Ada While Tak- Down Ranges Used For Wartime Bomber Practice WASHINGTON. Feb. Howies arranged to- day to go on the radio tomorrow night to explain the administra- tion s new wage-price policy. The new stabilization chief will speak over CHS from 10 p.m., central standard time. CORN. Feb., .......v. s considering installation of me- apparently ters to make more parking space available in the business dis- trict. City officials believe such a move would discourage long stays by motorists and thus make the shopping district more readi- I ly accessible. A group of soldiers about town for the past several days have become a topic of discussion as Ada people are wondering what they an- (loinj: in Ada. The soldiers have been in Ada for several clays: they are tear- ing down homhini: ranges that wen- established in this area for target practice for the Ardmore Army Air base when it was in operation. The .Mildicrs, about eight in all, will probably make- their head- quarters in Ada for several days or until they have completed their job. Several bombing ramies were used in this area, but were i-lused when the Atdmon- base was discontinued and there were no further uses for the ranges. Greater returns for amount in- lomorrow at p f his return from the exile into which lie was forced by the combined action the liberals, socialists and communists. Political observers ,-xpressed Ix-lief that should the Catholic party succeed in forcing a ref- erendum L e o p o 1 d probably would abdicate unless at Ic'.st 115 pcople his Some quarters belicvid that should the vote for Leopold be a minority he would renounce he throne in favor of ,on. I imce Baudium. Leopold is now in Switzerland. Return of Men To Be Gradual Maintenance Men Mutt Get Plants, Furnaces After Four-Week Shutdown PITTSBURGH. Feb. Steel mills employing more than half of the 750-000 ClO-United Steelworkers reopened today with the official ending of their strike at a.m. but the re- turn to work of many of the mca will be gradual. Industry officials said tenancc men would first have to get furnaces and plants prepared for a resumption of operations, which were shut down just four weeks ago by biggest strike in American labor history. A spokesman for the U. Steel Corp., said full production of steel would not be attained for three to four weeks. The strike was ended for mora than 380.000 workers, most ot them employed by the basic steel producers. U. S. StecL with 130.000 workers: Bethlc. hem. with 75.000: Republic, with and Youngstown Sheet and Tube, with among the companies resuming under new agreements with union providing for an 18 cents an hour wage increase. Other Companies Slgninr Lmon officials expected other companies to quickly sign contracts. David J. secretary-treasurer of the union, reported headquarters "swamped" with calls from com- panies, and that "we have hun. drcds of conferences going on all over the country." Pickets continued to patrol non-signing companies but Mao Donald asserted: "Just as fast as those Welrton Increase Meanwhile, one of the few basic steel plants In thc nation, unaffected by the walkout the wen-ton Steel Co.. with 10000 workers at wVirton. W. Va.. and Steubenville. O.. announced a 23 cents an hour increase for ly. piece-work and tonnage ployes. but Weirton Independent Union, Inc.. as its collective bargaining Announcement of the Increase was made jointly by President Thomas E. Millsop of the com- pany and President Larry Laf. ferty of the Independent union. The agreement eliminated shift premium differentials and pro- vided a basic minimum wage ol 51 an hour, retroactive to Jan L No Strike At WVirton Lafferty emphasized the in. crease was obtained without m strike, nnd said it was the "first time in the history of the lead. State thc- Many of the companies out contracts now are the steel fabricators, who buy finished steel and produce from bridges to They want In kn.iw what prira relief they will receive, contend- ing they would be operating at financial loss by signing at high- er wages and also paying moro for their basic steel SCHOOL LAND LOANS REDUCED SHARPLV" Journalism Schools Add Circulation Importance of Circulation Management Recognized CORN, Feb., 18, area recently shipped :il heifers to to aid in restocking dairy Thirty-four heifers w re but three were sold to pay the shipping charges of the others. OKLAHOMA CITY. rVb.. in. As part of an intensified marine recruiting- drive, temporary en- listimnt .stations will be set up tomorrow at post offices in Wood- and Miami. KANSAS CITY. Feb.. IB. Walter G. Andrews, circulation nannger of the Fort Wavne. Ind Siews-Sentinel, told members of he midwest circulation managers Association yesterady that about 5 universities and colleges have idded a course in newspaper cir- culation manaRemcnt to their journalism curriculums. Andrews, chairman of a com- mittee of the international cir- culation managers association ap- nomted last June to urge inclu- sion of circulation management emirses at journalism schools, .said no textbooks on the subject were available, but that the com- mittee had supplied the colleges with much material, and planned to furnish lecturers from t h e ranks of circulation managers. Among those present at associa- tion round-table discussions were Philip F. Johnson. Linclon Neb Star; Charles H. Cleaver St' Louis Star; and Harry W. Cullis. chief of the newspaper boy divi- sion of the United States trea- sury. The organization's .list annual convention will close tomorrow with the election of officers. OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb. 18 "Ulllber "f delinquent school land loans has been re- duced from 1.742 to 723 durine the administration of Gov. Rob- ert S. Kerr. figures presented to thc commission today showed Walter Marlin. secretary of the commission, said the number of delinquent loans now outstand- ing was the lowest "in many years. Marlin said the number of loans now on th about Greater returns for amount In- News Classified Ada. TH' PESSIMIST Mr Bob Mrs. Gather Harp cot- lapsed lust night, soon after supper, when 'cr husband put tn newspaper down an' said a few pleasant words. Now makin' placo f live. that most folks a livm', ther' rjn't no   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication