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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 17, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 17, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             We're ready to believe almost anything that the scientists tell us now of new wonders about to appear but when one of them says accident-proof taxicabs are on the way it's little too much. i C'lear Sunday, warmer panhan- dlr; incrra.sitiR cloudiness Sunday Ilicht. FHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS U.'i j .i.iy ADA. OKLAHOMA. SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17. 1946 CENM CQpg STEEL WAGE SETTLEMENTS SPREAD FAST '_________________ New Building Work Started Business and Homes Share New Construction Begun Despite Some Materials Shortages have hi-en doing some dunns; the last month i'f Ia-t and the first month J.nri of the fccond of v. ;tn 12 building permits issued tiie commissioner of fi- nance office during the period. If the Sugg building is included in the amount of the permits, the total 13 S29D.G50. A r.e-.v store building is be- ins r Instructed at the corner of Twelfth nnri Ash. however, a permit has not been issued for The construction of a new build- fhe now SUKC Clinic, at the corner of Thirteenth and Broad- way, was designed by Albert local architect, "and the contract was let to H. S. Moore, bid for construc- tion of the building itself. Air conciit-.nning of the building will cost SIS.TIO. according to auth- orities. Animal Hospital Construction began last wee': en a building to house an ani- ir.al hospital and clinic to be operated by Dr. Oral Sanders, veterinarian. The building. 40 by 300 feet, is being erected at Tenth and S. H. 19 and will be cnrr.ricte modern in its fa- cilities equipment for treat- ment of livestock and pels. Dr. Ed Granger got a prrmit for reconstruction of a building :n the 100 block East Main street. The cost of the addition was es- timated at Dr. Granger gj' his permit Dec. :i. On Dec. J. T. Byrd applied and received a permit to a ne-.v house in the Ar lingt'-n addition. He estimated thr of the building at Sl.- 200 did not dc.Mgniite when r.e would start construction. Farmer Builds A building to cost about 000 is being cor.btructed by C. L. Fir.-7-. IT in the 300 block East Tenth. The permit was issued January 10 and the building is veil underway. Fo.'tcr McSwain applied for a ptirr.it 11 to construct a crick and blocks storage build- ins behind and across the allay from SDann-Denison Motor com- pany. The estimated cost of the is S-i.OOO. For the construction of a home :n the Arlington addition. Rubv Edward received a permit for tr.e construction. The estimated cost was listed at Bi-twecn Stockton and Cherry Main street. J. L. Elton re'- t'-ivod a permit. Jan. Hi to con- j a building and list- C'" t at The build- :r.s has niieady been eompli-ted i <.r.d a shop and a cafe is there. Homcv Too Glad It's Over, Mayor? Road Goes On State System i Allen to Tupelo Rood To Be Extension of S. H. 48, With State Maintenance Ben T. Childers, chair-inn of the state highway commission, has written Hepres..-ntative Thomas P. Holt and Senator Al- len G. Nichols that the commis- sion will put on the state system the road from Allen to Tupelo by way of Lula, it being an exten- sion of highway 48. Hi.jhway -18 now runs from Tupelo south to Clarita and will probably be ex- tended south to Wapanucka. The road will be constructed as a farm to market Texan Dies Near Ada L. B. Stanley, Houston, Oil Field Equipment Sales, Suc- cumbs to Heart Attack I.c con Howden Stanley, 54. comi.msion, whose home is in Houston. Tex was found dead members of the parly SatirKlnv Russian Veto Overrules U. S. Proposal for Negotiation Of Levantine Demand on Troops By JOHN A. I'AURIS LONDON, Fob. invoked the power of veto for the first time tonight in the United Nations secur- ity council, overruling a U. S. proposal for negotiation of the demand by Syria and Lebanon that French and British troops morning after n farmer reported that a car had been partially parked on State Highway 09. about 12 miles north of Ada. A coroner's jury investigated the case and decided that Stan- Icy had died of natural causes as there were no signs of vio- Stanlr i. Tex., in his car by be withdrawn immediately from the Levant sheriff's force Mayor Uilham O Dwycr of New York City expressively wipes his brow and welcomes the end of a 10-day tugboat strike which forced citywide shut down due to fuel and food shortages. OD- shortages. workers have agreed to arbitrate their Man Who Sold Worth of Oil Leases Is Dead Col. E. Walters Started Auctioneering by Crying Sale Of Rich Osage Indian Leases in 1912, Adopted as Osage SKEDEE, Okla., Fob. E. Walters, 70. bAr' nuctionccr known to thousands of thc nation's oil men and a life-long peace officer, died at his home late yesterday. Walters began crying the sale of rich Osage Indian land leases in 1912 at the Indian agency in Pawhuska. Okla., and remained as auctioneer until a few years ago. It is estimated that he induced oil men to spend roughly for leases. Walters had been in ill health for some time. He was an adopted member of the Osage Tribe and had been given a jeweled U. S. deputy marshal's badge. Many of the tracts lie sold were in the highly productive Burbank area and a large part of them were sold under the "million dollar oak tree" on the Indian agency grounds. Scene of the sales was later moved. One tract sold by Walters was purchased by the late Josh Cosden. then head of Cosden and Co., for Walters was born near Fort Gibson, Okla., in the old In- dian Territory. His first name and initial "Col. E." came from the fact that his father greatly admired Colonel Ells- worth, killed in the Civil War. The father adopted the "Col. E." as thc son's name. as a farm to market ,-jaJ. but lence. A doctor's exam m ,tion re ,of "mDlc construction to vcaled that he had died of a British contention that under pro- v "f thc charter he qualify for the secondary system of state roads and will be main- tained by the state, according to thc letter from Mr. Childers. This will give Allen a state highway south from the eastern Pontotoc county oil center, a thing thc Allen people have been working for for many v-ears. Thc road was constructed Allen almost to Lula by thc coun- ty years afio. It was graveled, and has been usable in almost any weather since that time Wprk is expected to begin on thc job within 30 to 45 days. Four Car Wrecks Saturday But No Persons Injured Property damage was done to eight automobiles during thc sast two days when they were nvolvcd in four accidents, three of which happened on Broadway Police report that no one was njured in any of the affairs, but hat the vehicles suffered vary- ng damage. _ At o'clock Friday morn- ing on Main street, Mrs. M. B larbro, driving a Buich heart attack. Stanley, a salesman of oil field equipment, had a territory cov- ering parts of Louisiana, Arkan- sas. Oklahoma and Texas. Uldow Shocked, Not Surprised ftlrs. Stanley was contacted at Houston Saturday morning and Thc Soviet veto took the antine dispute out of the .security council's hands, b u t British Foreign Secretary Ernest Bcvin i pledged that Britain and France :l rlKllt to VL'to- Both would carry out the American Is, however, they agreed with plan. Seven members of the council voted for the American proposal submitted by it would the American prop'osaF. Then Bevin explained that "as operate the decision of the maj- ority of the security council." she had reported that Mr. Stanley been having heart troubl sedan, was involved Buick in an acci- A r.-v.- h'.n-.e Ada f-'-n "'1 :n the Smith .-idcii- liori will he ..iisti iji an co-.t of SU.MIO. A per- the nf this Du.lninc v .is lulled Jan. 10 to A. B _ W. J'.cavis received n per- Jan. 22 construct a new between JuhiiMin and en Thirteenth. Mr. Heav- i f the .section, was drilled to the Cromwell. K. Crosbie, Inc., No 1 Kellv NE SW of JMN-7E at the south of the East Ada distri't, has )een completed for eu- )ic feet of gas through perfora- LBIO feet oppo- Hurlov serted today it was known aboard before the end of the war that there had bern a leakage of atomic energy secrets to Russia. "This is just another example of how nearly everyone except tne American people gains infor- mation vital to our national se- curity.1 he said in an interview. It was known abroad before the end of the war that there bad been a leakage on thc subject of atomic energy. "On the other hand, the state department has studiously pre- vented information vital to American welfare from getting to the American people. Sureh they are the ones who shouU know when their own sccurit is menaced." General Hurley, who resigned as ambassador to China last Nov S. n. I ember with charges that some state department -career men were sabotaging United Stairs in- terests-, declined to claboraoU tions anioifK Britain. France and the levant for withdrawal of British and French troops from Syria and Lebanon. Agreed with U. S. Idea Soviet Vice Commissar Andrei V ishinsky then invoked the pow- er of veto. Bevin and the French orges Bida- France, would the provisions of the American proposal even though it was vetoed by Russia and tak- en out of the bunds of thc coun- cil. Council Today's action cleared the last i major political item from thc U. S. Steel Deal Pattern Bethlehem, Republic, Oth- ers Sign Agreements; Workers Ready to Return To Jobs By WILLIAM NEEDHAM WASHINGTON. Feb. settlements in thc rapid- ly-dissolving steel strike spread throughout the nation today and CIO President Philip Murray predicted that more than 90 per cent of the workers in basic steel would be ready for work by Sunday night. Foreign Minister ult, who had voli; _........._____________ cdfrom voting, upheld tiie Rus- (Continued on Page a Column 1) 'forgotten Strike' GM and CIO-UAW Near Accord On Most Issues Now DETROIT. Feb. lengthy session between rank- ing officials of General Motors Corp. and the CIO fjnited Auto Workers broke up late today with a near-accord on most issues in the proposed contract. Special Mediator Janes F. Dcwey said another meeting w-ould be held Sunday in an effort to end the 88-day-old strike of GM workers Dcwcy Rave the fallowing statement which he said was agreed to by both parties. 'Management and the union will prepare in new language one or two sections of the con- tract bill in dispute." He went on to say able progress was made Neither the company nor union issued any statement. 1 the last election'. Ol.ia.. Feb.. Ifi. M'i_ Er.wm I. Reefer, -Iti. oil royalties dealer and ron of E B. Heeser p.-e.'i'jcr.t of Barnsdall Oil Co..! T .day announced that he will the democratic nomination Second Victim Of Tornado Is Dead ARDMORE, Okln., Feb. Bell, Gfi, died today, second person to succumb to :T county Sheriff. He injuries received in Wednesday's of the coun- tornado. Mrs. Zella Orr, 65, died i Thursday. The home of Bell, a painter :e to drill big and paper banger, was one of 50 patience. ly and quickly. Uncle Sam lias simplified the matter considerably in the last year or two bflt when it comes to joint or separate returns whose business it is to know how to make the returns out still have it on the average taxpayer in a big way. Approve Levrc Plans ;LSA. Okla., Feb. 10. TULS demolished. Bell had lived here Construction Of n lovee 10 pro- 2.r) years. I tect Ponea City and vicimtv from JWEATHER _ OKLAHOMA: Clear Sunday. pann.incile: ir.cicasmg Sunauy nignt. Thirteen other persons taken to hospitals were reported re- covering. America has had five capitals: Philadelphia. Princeton. Anna- polis, New York and Washing- ton. Capital for auto repair is Smnctt-Mcadcrs. 2-17-lt Arkansas river floods has been approved by district and division U. S. engineers, providing re- quirements of co-operation arc met. Col. E. H. Marks, division engineer from Dallas, announced Arkansas U. Head Is Resigning Post LITTLE ROCK. Feb. Ur. A. M. Harding has resigned as president of the University of Arkiinsan. effective ,1 u n e it was disclosed here today by Her- bert L. Thomas of Fayetteville chairman of the board of trustees In a letter to Thomas. Dr Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads Harding expressed a "wish and hope to retain a connection with the university whereby I may be of continued service." i Dio assigned poor health as the reason for resigning e Post he has held since July Thomas said that with approval of other members of the board of trustees he would appoint a fac- iiltv committee "to canvass thc field of educators throughout the United States and take whatever time is necessary" in recommend- ing to the board a successor to harding. Cotton Comeback Due, Is Forecast SHAWNKK, Feb. lon is due fur a comeback in Ok- lahoma s agricultural-industrial program, the fifth annual State Louon conference stressed todav. pre- Certain people tell the truth- uncertain ones are likely not to. _ frank Keller, Shawnee, -siclrd. Approximately 200 per- sons oil men gmners, farmers, bankers, coun- ty agents and chamber of com- nii'ice secretaries. Films were shown of mechani- cal cultivation and harvesting methods. A. L. Ward. Dallas. Tex.. .1 di- rector of the National Cottonseed 1 rodticts association, was the principal speaker. Others were I. M. Parrott, Oklahoma experi- ment station: Horace Hayden Oklahoma Cotton Ginners asso- ciation secretary: Shawnce Brown. Oklahoma A. and M. col- lege extension service and Ferdic Deenng. editor of thc Farmer- Stockman. Brail to Farmrr-Stnckman OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb. Ifi i Beall. former Okla- homa A. and M. college extension livestock specialist, has joined the Oklahoma Farmer-Stockman staff as live-stock editor. He was dis- thc navy two charged from months ago. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. Ada Girl Reported Hurt in Accident Louise Hodges Badly In- jured in Highway Mishap Louise Hodges, 17 year ol.l Ada girl, is reported in a critical con- dition at the Cotton clinic hos- pital in Atoka after her neck was broken Saturday night. Feb. U. in an accident that occurred on the Arrest Made And Still Is Seized Marshal Stanficld, Depu- ties Bring in Sizeable Whiskey-Making Outfit Allen Stanficld. deputy U. S. arshal, accompanied by Jirn Rogers and Ray Goodwin of the sheriffs force, arrested Other Simpson Saturday morning four miles north of Cottonwood near Coalgate in Coal county. Simpson was found at a large whiskey still, when- authorities said he had been working be- fore they arrived at the location. The marshal confiscated a gallon still, llio gallons of whis- key mash and 12 gallons of whis- key. Stanfield said that lit rases of empty syrup cans were found near the still in addition to a number of empty sugar sacks. There was no evidence as to how long the empty cans and sacks had been there. The still was fairly well hid- ncorci- dcn in a clump of trees. When I mg to the Indian Citizen-Demo- Headed by a late-afternoon, agreement with Bethlehem Steel company, second larRest pro- ducer in the industry, the list of signed contracts by nightfall covered nearly half the striking CIO Slim Agreement Shortly before Bethlhem sign- ed Republic steel-third-rank, ing Producer and Crucible Steel company an. nounced did Aluminum Company of Amer- ica. Later the Blaw Knox com- pany said it had reached an agreement also. Murray told re- porters he expected contracts to be signed before tomorrow night with Wheeling. Inland, Youngs- Sheet and Tube. National. Pittsburgh. Sharon, and Alle- Kheny-Ludlum. The Crucibl. contract will be signed tomorrow alternoon. A CIO spokesman said that l'ad bccn Cached with the Wickwire-Spencer steel division of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Corporation on terms similar to those mvolvmR OI COI. Despite the termination of walkout, however. Murray warn- ed that the industry probably could not back irito full pro. duction before a week or 10 da vs. In each of the steel company contracts, the increasit upon was the IB cents hourly pattern established last mght by U. S. Steel Corporation. I he Aluminum Company, bow- ever, agreed to a 19-eent" which Murray said was a "book- 1- miles Wapanucka highway east of Atoka. m Local highway patrolmen ?aid night that they hart been informed of the accident (Continued on Page 8 Column 5) Four Addresses e-cino- the officers walked up, Simpson i crat of Atoka. when H.ill lost had just quit working and did i control of his car and turned ovei not resist a i-i i v. 11 njit i, but did not investigate it. Thev OKLAHOMA CITY, Fob Ifl_ also sajd that they had m-en told I Hobert S. Kerr will ;s Hodges was suffering i addresses this week iroken neck ami 'jack. Illu' Principal one nt a Democratic Day dinner at Topeka, Nans., Saturday, nucka man. driver of Ihe'eai'.'ii'n'd Kt'rr w'" speak to the Hlack- well Chamber of Commerce Monday night. Thursday he will participate in a debate with house Republican Leader Joe Musgrave Of Tulsa on the ques- tion of taxes and industrv at a I meeting of the Tulsa League of that Miss from a 1 Held in Atoka jail are Clyde t. Hall, 22. Ft. Worth and Wn'pa- niii-Ka man. driver of the ear. and I hurman L. Hook, 20. of W.ipa- nucka is free on bail fol- lowing fifing of whiskey trans- portation charges and p-jymcnt of a fine for drunkenness. The accident occurred, record- not resist arrest Simpson will be arraigned Monday before Wayne Lewis. U. S. commissioner. He is in county in the center of the y early in the evening as the proun was bound for Atoka P .___ v _ New Dioramas For Rogers Memorial CLAREMORE. Okla.. Feb. 10. new dioramas de- picting various phases in the life. )f the late Will Rogers will soon be completed and placed in niches in the memorial to the fa- mous humorist. Mrs. Paula Love. -urator and niece of Rogers, said oday. The dioramas are being done i said by Jo Mora. California artist and I vill be in Hydrostone to match Lawton Likely To Get Fish Hatchery WASHINGTON', Feb. Legislation authorizing the gov- ernment to transfer to the Citv of Lawton. Okla., a federal "fish butchery there has been approved by the house fisheries committee. Announcement was made by Rep. Jed Johnson au- t thor of the bill. Thc city will maintain the hatchery if the pro- 1 ject is turned over to it, Johnson nine others. OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb. Oklahoma swine breeders to- day sold 52 bred sows and gilts kemia __ Leukemia Fatal To Owasso Bov TULSA, Okln.. Feb. Three-year-old Billv Mack Lew- is, son of Mr. and Mrs. Olin Lew- is of Owasso, Okla., died in a hospital today a victim of leu- rare blood disease. He otal of Read the Ada News Want Ads. Women voters. Friday he will speak State Soil Conservation to tha Super- visors Association at Stillwater. TH' PESSIMIST Most married couples would never win a cup on th1 way they git along. Many a lie is spoken in 'n effort f be agreeable.   

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