Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 15, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             not haye Onythin9 Fair tonight. Saturday and Sun- day; nol MI cnli! tonight e-vcept in west central; warmer Saturday HE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 238 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1916 In Demand That Troops Leave Accuses Britain, France of Attack on Sovereignty, Failing to Keep Agree- ment! Atom Test Is 'Buck Rogers' Some of Plans Sound Fan- tastic; World Can't Stond Another War, Says Flier Yum! II v JOHN A. PA It It IS LONDON. Feb. 15 Mt threw her support lo the Le- vant states in the United Nations security council today, declaring t.-.err f overe-ignty had been "clear- Iv violated" by the occup.ition by British and French treieips. Vice Commi.v-ar Andrei Vish- toid the council a French to permit [iritain and F; work emt an r-n w their lorccs Syria and Lebanon "cannot the Seivii-t Union." Yivhinsky spoke after llie Uni- t'-.i State.-- had suggested tnat the L'-v.-.r.t states settle- thi-ir com- by din-ct negotiant n. _ Foreign Mimste-r Hamiel Bey of l.'-banon opened the de.-j.ite on Syriun-L e- b a n e s e- charce-s again.-' Britain a n el France, .-.n which feirce-d M-c-.nity e-emnril lo re-main :n as elele-gate-s lo the grne-ral assembly ele-pai te-d told the 11-nation peace- sse-ricy that the presence of and French troops con- "n menace of rr.rcicilrr.g in the internal affairs r.f a member of tin- UNO." and declared that pn-re-nce- is "Trot dictated by military neces- sity, nor by agrecme-nt of the governments, nor by internation- al accord." Have Resisted Request Fr.-.ncie was followed bv Sy- rian dele-sate Faris Bey El Kho'u- ry. v.-ho told the council that srr.ce the end of the war "we have made constant rcprcsenta- for the .Mimiltaneour. wilh- nf British and French "but we waited in vain." He pointed out that the Brit- accord ul December, i for PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 15 for the Bi- i kmi aloll test of the atom bomb .surface craft in the Marshall islands arc; so futuristic that General Henry H. (Hap) Arnold describes them as "Buck Hofiers" plans. The retired army chief of the army air forces detailed some of the plans for the atom-bomb tests at a press conference here Hc is off "t Philadelphia enroute to h i s birthplace in nearby Gladwynnc. General Arnold said the atom bomb tost (known as the cross- roads proje-rt) would be a joint operation of the navy, army and air forces. "One of the bombs." he said "will be set off from a static position near water level. The other will IH- dropped by one of five specially equipped of the air forces composite Kroup. the group which dropped the first atomic bombs and which now is in training at Iteis- we-U Held. .Mexico." lien. Arnold said a .special air forces unit was at another field in New Mexico training to study the effect of the atom bomb oh aircraft. He listed the questions they will seek to answer as: 1 How near the blast can .in air- i Plane fly and still escape de- struction: 2. How stronfi is the bombs shock wavo in the air i J. How stronft is the radioactive effect in the air around the blast: and 4. Is there radioactiv- itv in the huge cloud that rises i above the explosion. I At a Poor Richard club dinner honoring him last niKht. General Arnold told Ruests that I civilization cannot survive an- other war. i "I he said, "that the capabilities of warfare which exist m 1940. and which may come to exist in 1950 are too great for civilization, as we ;now it. to withstand. There will FIVE CENTS THE COPY Early Steel Strike Settlement Expected Under New Policy Paul Porter Head ol OPA Kentuckion from FCC Post, No Stronger to Price Con- trol Job and Problems as a sergeant. (NEA Mrs. HunnicuU is from Colchester, rmy New Row In P. H. Hearing Kcefc Soys Bratton Swore To False Statement In Charge of Testimony withdrawal of their be: no victor and no vanquished forces province! for "the mam- There will be only the ruins of trr.anre in the levant of suffi-' cities and of nations" erent forces In guarantee; security until such time as t h e United Nations organisation has rte-cided on the organization of collective security in this ;-one." Thinks British Ready He expressed gratitude to Britain for help elurmg two wars. "they saved our coun- trv frnm destruction." "If we had wanted a separate I think we could g--t right away from he added. Kl Khoury said the French-i an interesting program ready accord "makes it clear j Howard Maxey Peist No 72 troops will be maintained at Ada. has arranged for a special lu's which will h-ave Ada at fi Special Bus Will Take Vefs To Tish Legion Convention Tisho'ningo Legionnaires will ho hosts Sunday to the Fourth District Lrgion convention, with WASHINGTON, Feb.. 15. Without dissent, the senate and house today adopted n resolution extending the deadline for end- ing the Pearl Harbor investiga- tion to June 1. The house acted without dis- cussion a few minutes after re- ceiving the resolution from the senate. WASHINGTON, Feb.. 15, A wordy row broke out today at the Pearl Harbor hearing after lien. Keefe (H-Wis.) asserted that Col. H. ti.e.-e for an unspecified time." "The consent of the Levant ftates to the accord was ruled of the Mcture." he said. "It ;.ves no place for further nego- n." comment drew a reply f: Foreign Minister George's of France-: "The riiscrimiriMtory character the Syrian delegate gave his m.'i.-KS _ was superfluous and H- ve- t I-' so ave not :n nw.r.g a is In Vi mrjepend'-nce" he-r t: suitable rr.'T.ts have country." 1 the- e-ouncil to have- in H: itam anel France question thi-mselve-s L- a. m. Sunday and return after the" conve-ntion. All e-x-service men, whether or I not they are members of the Legion, are- mvite-d to 'go along.' ,lhe- invitation includes service j me-ii. their wives, sweethearts. I hose planning to go in the bus I are asked to call Jeie Roper or .either Legion members so that I lllov Ciirl know ahead of bus time1 mere- was a menacing how many are go ng by e er 1 1 e g a t o n s that method. Hound trip fare on the bus is SI. 1 Recistration will take place at the Tish Le-gion Hut from 10 a. m. until a. m. A fish din- college will begin The session of the convention begins at 1 p. ,n. at the Tish high school auditorium. Speak- ers will include Walter B. John- son, state director of veterans empleiyment service; Dr. W. K. Bat.-on. department defense- chairman: Mitt Phillips, state elire-e-teir veterans assistance; Kl- tne-r Frake-r. elepartme-nt adjutant and an aelelre-ss by Granville Scanland, department command- er. Ada Legion post heads are ex- pecting good attendance from Aeia. it-d the' intend Syria an said Fr countries their Lebanon in- ance was fol- hue of policy the- two state's and wanted to op; "as soon security arrange-- been worked out." clear there- is no thie-at matronal pe-ae-e" in the ve r-.t. he (OIK hidetl. Ppe-akir.g for Britain. Sir Ale-x- rnrirr sard Brit.em ele-- to withelraw her troops "at earlre-st p-isr-shle mome-nt." The- British and Fre-nch had to rr.ove arn-.res into the: Le-vant the war. he- said, and be-- the rr.d tf the- war dif.'ic-jltie-s between r.-rn-h troops and Syrians forc- ed tf-.e- Britr-h In mterve-ne- in order to protect the-ir communi- e ations. The British the-n asked France- an .'.gieeir.ent to with- er.-H-.V. he saiel. I ciri no' pretend it is 100 per ecr-.t satisfactory, but it is an at- te-rr.p: to provide for a with- er, .-a he concluded. jWEATHERl! i h a n 'i I e: ontinued warmer Saturday mild Sundav. Entire Cabinet Of Egypt Resigns CAIRO Feb. Minister Mahmoud Fahmy Nok- rashi Pasha and his cnlui- coal- ition cabinet resigned today Sources close to the govern- ment immediately predicted No- krashi would be asked to form a new cabinet which would in- clude only members of his own sadist party and members of the liberal constitution party, which already has a strong group in op- position ranks. It was expected the Wafdist party would be omitted from the government three members of the old cabine-t. members of Kotla independent group of tonight. Sat- and Sunday: not so e-old in w. c'-ntral; per .'id s except lower .id's the- Wafelist opposition, elesigned I i yesterday in protests against al- Ie-ge-rl gove-rnment se-verity in putting denvn anti-British stu- ele-nt riots. 1 British Ambassador Lord Kil- Ie-arn left for London during the of an un- Foreeasl Feir Feb. K a n s :i s. Oi.'ahotna in -.1 on Satuidav. e-nlde-r -n jind spreading over Oklahoma by Sunday and i :.n Nebra.-ka Monday- :e-5'. of district Tuc-stia.-: te-m'- v. ill nii.r noi- except ek-gre-e-s above- in iinii Kan-a--; pie-- b.- light Re-ne-rally showers or- lic.ht .-Mows Sun-j and in Ncl-ia i'fcuin about Tuesday. S. Bratton had sworn to a false statement." I he flareup come- on the sche- duled cxpiratiejn elate of the- sen- ate-house inquiry into the- Dec. 7, attack on Hawaii. Commit- tee Chairman Barkley (D-Ky.) told a reporter that he would seek an extension as soem as the committee agrees at a closed ses- sion on its length. Bratton was recalled feir ques- tioning by Kecfe on why he pre-vious testimemy about the de-- livery eif inte-rcepted Japanese me-ssages to Washington officials on the- eve of Pearl Harbeir Nei due Tei Notify Marshall Bratton said that his present recollection is that ho elid not have- anyone- deliver to Gen George C. Marshall on that even- ing any parts of the: inte-rcepte-d Japane-se message- breaking off diplomatic negotiations here. The message- was made- up of M parts, eif which M were inler- cepte-d anel dececied Dec. (i. Bratlem. then in the- intelli- gence scctiem. had said in an af- fidavit last ye-ar to Lt. Col. Henry O. Clausen that he had directed Col. C. C. Duse-nhury to deliver the first 13 parts to Marshall that night. Henics False Statement The-n you swore to a   Administration. The good news awaiting him is that OPA has just won its lirst house victory of __ an achievement Ol'A's le-gisljtive backers interpreted as an ultimate vote to continue OPA beyond the June 30 limit fixed by existing law. Test of Strength The victetry was an important test of strength, for it involved a strong republican drive to re- fuse OPA an additional this fiscal year, largely to finance an enforcement blitz .on black markets. The GOP drive failed and the houte voted the funds late yesterday. Porter' is no stranger to the woes and headaches of price con trol. He served as deputy administrator in charge of en feircing rent ceilings in 1942-4.' And he got another slant on th problem as deputy director of th office eif economic stabilization m the two ensuing years For Firm Restraint The new OPA chieftain long has made no secret of the fac that he; believes the general price level should be held firmlv in check, so the capital e-xpccted he would hew close to the po'.icie down by his prcdecassor New Formula Gives Speedier Price Aid But Imposes Stern Anti-Inflation Wage Controls By MARVIN' L. ARKOWSMITII WASHINGTON, Feb. industry will get speedier price help under the geivernmenfs new stabilization formula but it imposes stern wage controls in an effort to head off inflation. The revisod wage-price policy provides that in general pay hikes must be .'ederally-approvcd if they are io qualify as a basis for off-setting price increases. The formula also stipulates that, in order to win approval, wage or salary boosts must be constant- i tho Koavral pattern estab- i m indu5trjcs or leical areas since the end of the war. In many cafes these increases have ranged I.MIII around 15 to percent. Top Limit On Pay Oaiiis Tei the worker, all this means that collective Dai-gaining will gei on pretty much as usual, but there will be a top limit on how much more pay he can hope to most c.nes within this 15 to 18 per cent range. As for ndustry. heretofore, only a small part of such pay in- creases could uc Ufed as the basis for asking immediate price relief. Companies had to wait six mon- ths before ccplyinR for higher prices to offnet the Lion's share of any major wage jump. Now the -iix-nionths wait is out. If OPA finds that a pay boost ap- proved by the wage stabilization board confronts an in some cases, in individual firm financial hardship. OPA must "promptly provide" higher price ceilings. Base Is 1936-39 For industries or companies which will not be in full produc- tion for some time, the immedi- ate price increase must be large enough to assure a full year's profit equal to its average earn- ings during a pre-war base per- iod. In virtually all industries i this' base is 1936-39. The immediate price increase will be smoller for companies which are ipcrating at a "tern- porary low volume." In other' words. OPA decides great- Wage-Price Line Raised Chcster A. Bowles. Strictly speaking, the -41-ye.ir- old Porter was emly sure eif his new jeib for about 20 week1? bui egislation to extend OPA's lif, beyonel June: 30 now is pelleting in the house banking committee and should be ready for the floor soon. It was with their eyes on this extension bill that OPA backers nailed yesterday's vote ffrar.Unc the agency additional funds. The JPPi'opriation was e-ontained in a 5J..I.. deficiency m e a sure which was approved anel feir- wardcd to the; senate for aetiem. American Ships For Chinese Navy Start Up fo Congress If 271 Small Vessels to Be Given To Oriental Nation any Tribal Leaders Threaten Action If Bedouin Slaying Not Worked Out DAMASCUS. Feb. The mureler of an Arab she-ik threatened a de-se-rt war toelay. Prince- Faour Alfaour. chief of the; fadal tribe, said he and four other sheiks had informed the Syrian prime minister that tri- bal sheiks were conferring in the desert and that tribes would ga- ther if the government failed to satisfy their demands for solu- tion of the murder. The government is undertak- ing to isolate the entire Bedouin tribe of Naims by moving them west of the Orcntes rive-r to re- lieve the tension, but Faour said that would not suffice. A month ago Sheik Trad Al- mie Isem, chief the Hseneh r, ION. Feb.. 15.   the Anciza tribesmen across the border in Iraq. The semi-Nomadic Naims arc in close touch economically with the neighboring cities of' Horns anel llama. Meatle-ss and fishless Wednes- days in Washington's 52 govern- ment cafeterias saved six tons of the two products weekly. r, no com- Georgian gave reporters until after the steel strike the information as he urged the ''eon ended. United Mine Workers' Presi dent John L. Lewis was out o town but his UMW Journal, com menting on the lengthy confer ences which preceded announce ment of the new policy last night will say editorially in the issue out today that: "Presielent Truman would have. done well to accept the admoni- tion of President Lewis, made eiurmg the labor manag-ment rule's committee to clear the 'Chinese navy" bill for house ac- tion next week. Beside-s the six D-E's on the navy s list, he said the ships the nre-sident "may" want to transfe-r include: Six buoy and light tenders. 217 landing craft of various types six motor gunboats, four submarine chasers, six 17.1-feiot submarine chasers, ten 110-foot submarine chasers, three oilers one surveying ship, two repair ships, two floating drydocks and eight motor sweepers or sub- marine chasers. H.IIINKSE COMMUNIST PI ASH WITH SINCJAPORE POLICE SINGAPORE. Feb. I One Chinese was killed and I" weiunded today when 'police His- perseel a crowd eif about 100 per- sons who ignoreel a peilice order forbieielini; the- communist party to hold a rally em the femrth an- nivrrsary of of Singapore to the Japanese. The- headfiuarter.t of Admiral Lord Leiuis Meumtbatti-n immedi- ately announce-d that it wenilel in- vestigate allegations that mem- bers of the civilian police force had charged into the crowd with batons and loaded rifles. A minor clash between Chinese communists and Malay police constables occurred earlier out- side the ceimmunis quarters, which v the police last night. conference, when he asserted that free enterprise and free collective bargaining constituted th? ans- wer to the president's many and varied problems." Coaching for Cafe ML'SKOGEK. Okln Feb. 15 Arthur (Pete) Smith announced toelay he: had resign- ed as football line coach at Mil- waukee's Marquette university to enter the restaurant business here. Smith, who went to Marquette with Ceiach Tom Stidham from the University of Oklahoma in 1341, has opened a cafe. The 31-year-old former Soon- er gnelster and assistant e-oach was discharged from the army last September 27 and returned for the football Male ebimpanxees do not ma- ture until 12 years of age. i Diamonds may be colorless, I blue white, blue, pink, red vcl- llow, green, brown or black." nl when the draft has been asked to provide 125.000 instead of the current monthly quota of By this drastic means the war department said it was hoped to obtain men through the draft eluring the first five months of this year as re-placements for the- army's thinning ranks. Sele-ctive Service officials said they believed the- demand ceiuld be met from a pool of men who had been rated as qualified feir limited service but proviouslv turned down by the army. These men are among approximately I.JaO.OOO between 18 and 25, mos't of whom had been classified 4-F for physical or mental reasons. Men with "mental deficiencies, mild in degree." men with cer- tain typejs hernia and those who stammer or stutter will be taken under the lowereel stand- ards, which the war department termed "the absolute minimum requirements for any type of military service." The result, it was conceded may be "a considerable reduc- tion in overall efficiency and probably an eventual increase in the percentage of discharges for physical disability." Under-previous physical stan- dards, Selective Service has been supplying only approxi- mately of the armv's monthly quota of 5.000 men. The war department said that in ad- dition to the regular monthly quota it had called on Selective Service to make- up by the end if April a deficit of approxi- nately men thus nccumu- ated since V-J day. CALCUTTA QUIETER CALCUTTA. Feb. Disturbances which swept Cal- utta for three days and left at east 45 dead and more than 400 njured subsided today under the vi-tchful eyes of British troops. Public services were gradually returning to normal, but the Bengal and Assam railway re- ported difficulties at Akra sta- tion. 30 miles southeast of Cal- cutta, where large crowds had gathereel. Railway officials halt- ed traffic through Akra to avoid trouble. --.cap thu; denouement of a month-long drama of conflict among subordinates, the presi- dent appealed for firm holding of the: new and higher line to avoid 'the: misery and of infla- "I call upon both in.in.-mt-in and labeir tei proceed with eluction." Mr. Truman statement. "Production Production is im-nt pro- said m a is our salvation, the basis of wages and profits and high stan- dards of living for us all Pro- duction will do away with necessity for government trols. tllL- cein- In his statement the chief ex- ecutive referred both to the crip- pling effect of strikes and the} dangers of inflation, declaring- ork stoppages have continu- ed and some- of them are serious enough to threaten our economy with almost complete paralysis. They are accompanied m- flationary p r c s s u r e s '.jm aNo (Continucd on Page 2 Column 5) TH' PESSIMIST Gather Harp says th' trou- ble with th' risin' generation don't rise early enough. Financially .1 fel- ler has f go some t' come back.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication