Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 13, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             MnMly r! mid v and colder this afternoon; ruin rhnnsinR to >.now in MHithca.st 42nd 25G PHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 13. 19tfi Two Army Officers Retrace Bataan Death March, Find It Lined With Tragic Relics FIVE CENTS THE COPK tr. t: By PAt'L II. MASON Tor IIAI. IU1YLK) HALANGA. Rata.-in. Kdi., 13, Tv.-d officers who death cled again road of rcir.embrance :i few days .-IRO. found both disappoint- ment and a challcnae along the much way through llu- jungle. Difanpointmcnt. they "that time and perspective have c.-.ar.ged the scene a lot and a challenge. in that "the country must 5ce to it that we never have another Bataan or anything half so horrible." Thev were Col. H. Ball of Williamsport. Pa., corps ar- tillery officer for Maj. Gen. George II. Parker's second corn? and Major Achille G. Tisdcllc, to Maj. Gen. Knicst P. King -.under of Luzon forces who on April capitulated tn G e ne r a 1 Masaharu i Hnrr.rr.a in a school house in this villace. Kiisly Relics Line Route Nearly lour years later, the road America's gethcsemane v. a; with the ru.-ty. lotting nf ttiat army. Return of th" two officers to per.inrula 'only as a "sentimental journey" "lor two men who spent moYe than three years each iti Japanese pri- sons. hut. more importantly, to provide army historians with first-hand accounts of the death march by ni  the outgrowth of his testi- mony ror.rcrmng F. i-.vin W. Pau- Tu: man's nominee fnr t.r.d'T r c; -ft.-iry of the navy. _ whether Pauley's nom- would withdrawn as a of opposition in the ST.stc. said "not to my Silrnt On Background He the same reply to I'aulcv' had v.-itlidiawnl of his President Trurr.an has raid !-.e would not withdraw the nomina- tion. Reporters peppered with cuejtior.s .15 to whether Ickes was to _ resign. th" lesignatinn come of own uccord or was it request- A rcporl-.-r asked. "It in en its own accord, i Ross What sharply pointed up the occasion was the politically testimony Ickes gave ago senate committee n'-ar.-gr on th.. qualifications of EC-.-, in W. to be undcr- ferrf tary navy. Ickes. i-.oliiover of the ori- deal cabinet of I'l.Ti, tr.at Patiley as democra- tic national treasurer in IIM-I ad- the "rawf-st proposition It was. Ickcs said, a suggestion 'Continued on page 2 no. 1) The resignation of the "Old Curmudgeon" who look office with Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933. grew out of Ickes' opposition to the nomination of Edward W. Paulcy to be undersecretary of navy, and the president's sup- port of the California nil man. Coloradoan To Take Over Ickes asked to be relieved March 31. But Mr. Truman made the resignation effective Friday. Feb. 15. The president's letter of acceptance was not made public. The president designated Oscar L. Chapman, a Coloradoan who has served 13 years as an assis- tant to tnkc over Ickes' duties pending the appointment i of a permanent secretary Ickrs' letter of res- ignation said of his testimony in opposition to the nomination of Paulev: No Apologies For Truth "I cannot accept Ihc theory that I should have told the sen- ate naval affairs committe any- thing than the truth. I have no apologies for having done so. although I did regret the unhappy personal position in which I have involuntarily found myself." Ickes told the comm'ittee that Paulev had advanced the "rawest proposition ever made to me" by suggesting that could be raised in campaign contributions from California oil men if the government would dron its suit to establish federal title to oil- bearing tidewater lands. Ibis Paulev denied, saying Ickes was mistaken. The presi- dent, too. told a press conference that Ickes could be wrong, and jthis provided the springboard for 71-year-old secretary's resigna- tion. Chides President [_ Ickes wrote that some of Mr. i Truman's friends "resent keenly the fact" that "I told the truth" then added: "As to your statement that I might have been mistaken in my testimony my feeling is that, since you were not present at Members of a citizen's commit- tee have presented city commis- sioners with a proposition for the city charter to be reviewed this year. The club members met with commissioners Tuesday af- ternoon in the office of" the mayor. The commissioners agreed to look over th" proposition and decide on it aT the next regular meeting, which is scheduled for next Tuesday .ifternpon. One of the commissioners re- marked on the expense connected with calling at least one and inaybe two special elections if they put tile proposition before the people in the primary elec- tion. If the proposition is approved by the people, a board of free holders will then have to be elected to review the charter and make recommendations if they think that changes are necessary. The recommendations would then have to be voted on and if the people think that they are worth while, a council will then have to be elected to do further work. This is not a rase of "write your but the com- missioners -.'.'ill welcome opinions of the public ivfore their meet- ing next Tuesday. The public is also invited to attend any or all of the commissioners' meetings which are licM each Tuesday af- ternoon at 2 o'clock. BlusterylKnieF Takes Over Kansas Cold and Snow Move Across State, Spell of Win- ter to Break Tomorrow New Yorkers Rush fo Work Fuel Crisis Eoses, Business Back to Normal, Schools Still Closed .NEW_ YORK, Feb. f i ork City, which for 18 Although handicapped by lack of machinery and technically trained manpower, Russia is forging ahead with its postwar recon- struction. Photo above chows repair worl: progressing on the gigantic Dnieper Dam, destroyed during the war. (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) TOPEKA, Feb. tery, winter weather gripped Kansas firmly today as temper- atures toppled snow flurries broke out in scattered areas. Weatherman S. D. Flora pre- dicted the cold wave would break late tomorrow and snows would end by tonight. winds have knock- ed Kansas temperatures down as much as -40 eiegrecs in the last 2-1 hours." Flora said, then fore- cast highs in the state todav of near 25 or 30. Lows he said, would be near 10 to 15, rising no higher than .10 tomorrow. No snows were reported in the north central or northwestern Kansas whcatlr.nds where mois- ture is needed for an ailing crop, but Wichita reported of an inch of snow during the night that is drifting. Snow swirled into Kansas City overnight and was continuing this morning. Other snow: reported were: Olathc .0-1 of an inch, with traces at Topeka and Dodge City. Wichita reported a 30-mile an hour wind '.h's morning and a 35 mile an hour north wind last night but Flora expected the blow to fade today. With a high of 5i! degrees yes- terday, Topeka was the waniiest reported spot in the state while Gondland and Phillipsburg shar- ed lows of 17 List night Two Days Of GM-UAW Tilt Holiday Begin In New Step Teachers and Other School People to Oklahoma City For OEA -Conrentton With the full approval of the boys and girls of the schools, teachers of Ada public schools nnrl Kast Central will convene, with several other thousands of Instructors and ad- ministrators, in Oklahoma City Thursday and Friday. It is the occasion of the annual convention of the Oklahoma Ed- ucation Association. NLRB Hearing Postponed, Another Meeting of Prin- cipals in Dispute Rumored DETROIT, Feb. scheduled resumptinn of the na- tional labor r'-liitions board hear- college ing on CIO United Auto Workers 'charges tint CJi-ni ral Motors Corp. had failrci to bargain in good faith v.-ith the union was suddenly postponed this morn- ing. There was nn immediate ex- planation of the postponement HI.III.IUOII oi me postponement And as teachers and principals I but the action cave rise to reports and superintendents and deans that another meeting of the man- agement and and college presidents will be in the state capital city, the schools here will just have to omit their rlasswork for the remainder of the week. Youngsters in particular have been bubbling nil through today with the pre-holiday efferves- cence that is customary just be- fore any vacation. They are to return to their union on the wage and contract was being ar- ranged. The union yesterday turned down a inanart-ir.ent offer of an increase of lll'j cents an hour (1G'_- per cont) and Walter P. Heuther. U.V.V CIO vice-presi- dent, immediately rejected it, leaving the lu-r.otiating confer- ence Heuth-.-r said the union rep- v. J III AO hours yesterday was as quiet as a country hamlet, roared back to its normal spirited pace todav following revocation of a fuef- saving edict that imposed the most drastic business shuldown in the city's history. Just as suddenly as it had come, the order clamping a lid on all but essential activities was ifted last night by Mayor Wil- liam O'Dwyer who said the fuel crisis had abated and that the city now was assured of a suffi- cient flow lo meet essential re- quirements. The cause of it 10-dav slnke of 3.500 lugboat workers in .New 'York unseUled, and a rationing pro- gram invoked last week still was in effect. Schools, too, remained closed. Commuters Jam Transportation Olherwisc, the city quickly swung hack to normalcy. Thou- sands of commuters again jam- med subways, buses and trains lo get lo offices from which most or them were barred yesterday, iransit lines, whose operations had been curtailed 20 per cent were operating full blast in time (or the morning rush. Office workers, thousands of whom were thrown into confu- sion yesterday by the mayor's proclamation, gathered in groups on sidewalks outside their build- ings ahead of opening time and talked _ about the shutdown. A big qucslion was whether they would get paid for not working yesterday. No official ruling was available, city offi- cials declining comment and union officials saying no policy had yet been formulated. Business Tally Costs Business leaders gloomily took iccount of their losses. It was es- timated the shutdown cost the garment industry de- wtmcnt stores and entertainment industry The 10-day old tugboat strike situation remained at a stand- still after a committee of tug- boat operators declined to meet with union representatives at a citv hall parley. The only hope of settlement of the walkout was an indication by O Dwyer thai Hie East Half of City Smashed by Storm Numerous Homes' Demolished, Others Badly Damaged; Five of Injured Believed Seriously Hurt by Storm ARDMORE, Fob. persons were hurt, five seriously, when a tornado roared without warning through the east half of this southern Oklahoma city of 20.000 earlv todav. At least 25 frame houses were ripped apart and their wreckage scattered over a wide area. Fifty more were dam- aged. Some lost roofs, others windows and porches. A 2-story brick building demolished at the easl end of j B Plate glass windows in business Returns To State Today buildings in the area of the brick structure were blown in. Signs were scattered over the section. A search of most of the wrecked area indicated no lives were lost but the hunt for per- sons who might have been trap- ped continued. Light, Phone Down The tornado apparently hit tin- east end of the main thorough- fare then skipped into the east- ern residential section. Lights over the city went out and telephone communication was disrupted as the tornado snapped poles like matches. were blown down or Trees ______ _______ _ broken. Falling in the streets, they hampered rescue workers. Vehicles were unable to get to the section worst hit and search- ers went in on foot. By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER LONDON. Feb. jiL-.mun oy United Nations assembly com- niui UK.- committee I m'ttce voted overwhelmingly to- might meet with union officials j day to establish temporary Uni at M P.m. todav if ted TC.ltinna :M Injured persons from the wreckage. carried several stretchers. Cecil Higginbotham, 31. were dug Many were blocks on who with five other members of his injured, described asleep in the family, was the blow. "We were all -fle said. House Fell Apart 'A sudden roar awakened us. Our house just seemed to fall apart around us. "When we knew what was go- Ada Area Shares Heavy Snowfall, Road Hazards After Soaking Rain During Night Winter's latest splurge blanketed with snow the idea that spring was pushing the cold- er season out of the picture. But preceding the snow this area experienced a variegated assortment of weather that in- eluded high wind, a drenching downpour, a bit of sleet. Rain Brief But Htavy Tuesday was moderate, with a 62 degree reading. This was driv- en down to 31 during the night and kept down as more cold (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) UNO Voles New York As Temporary Site p.m. today if they obtained ssion from the full Pen.i berr.lnp of the sociation. Union men mem- As have agreed to .v .xttu i.Td t1-lllfMJl (II y Ulll" ted Nations headquarters in New City. The committee rejected n pro- posal that the temporary site should be in San nrxt Motulny morning, ivsrntativos v.ould not return un- t llf'ir mill tin re :i til .-i 11. Knid Field Retained PHOENIX, Ariz., Feb. Gen. James P. Hodges, commanding of the army air forces training command, savs seven fields throughout t li e country will be kept on an ac- tive basis. i- En'd army air field at Enid, Okla. Others are Williams and Luke lelds in Randolph, Goodfcllow and Pen-in fields in Texas and Barksdale field in -ouisiana. thereby giving their" mothers a rest, and settling into another stretch of regular school work. Red Cross Worker C of C Speaker Mary Hallum to Relate Ex- periences, Tell of Postwar Work of Organization Mary C. Hallum. Red Cross worker for years in other parts of the world, will address the Ad.i Chamber of Commerce Thursday noon at the Aklridge Hotel. She will relate experiences of top interest from her Red Cross career, and describe, in part, the role of the country's greatest pri- vate welfare organization during peace, particularly the post-war period. Read the Ada News Want Ads. Full Brother of Del Zento 1st Arrives, Better Looking Calf til GM was m-.'parcd to meet the Hi's cent (171-.- per cent) hourly increase recommended by a pres- idential fiict-findim; board. Mediator Still Active James F. Dewey. special labor department mediator, who has been seeking for more than a fortnight to settlement of the ilfi-day old strike that has idled CIM production workers, denied he had sought adjournment of the NLHU hear- ing. He said he going to "con- fer with each side separately back and forth and try to get this worked out." He added that he was "going to try a new ap- proach to the is: ties." CJM Offer General Motors' offer of an Ifl'z cents an hour increase bet- tered its last offer, made on Nov. 7. by five The manage- incut offered the strikers the al- I lei-native of returning to work under a proposed interim con- tract until detJils of a new agree- ment could he completed, or hav- ing the wace increase become ef- fective on the elate they return to work. The company proposed n dues checkoff elans.-, but reiterated its objections to continuance of a un- ion mcmber.ihip maintenance clause in the contract. uispuie lo arbitration but the owners as yet have not reached agreement on procedure for arbitration of the issues that led to the walkout. The revocation of the shut- down order was effective at 6 p.m. (est) last night. O'Dwyer tion up to the whole assembly. The Westchoster-Fairfield area of New York state and Connecti- cut had previously been recom- mended by the committee as per- manent United K.itions head- Nine States Grew During War Years Natural Increase Reported Of Births Over Deaths One other top issue, the Indon- stion, remained to be fore the United Nations could ad- journ its current meeling. Trygve Lie. secretarv-ceneral. was re- ported to have expressed the opinion the assembly would wind up its business by Friday night. The security council was sched- uled to meet at 0 p.m. (3 p.m., C.S.T.) to take up the Indonesian problem. One other issue, the demajid of Syria and Lebanon for cvacua- Police Chief Dud Lester and highway patrolmen have warned motorists that travel is dangerous in this section of the state. "Trips that are not absolutely necessary should the chief said. Several police radios in the state and especially highway patrol headquarters in Okla- homa City have issued warn- ings to motorists that travel is dangerous. Locally, two wrecks oc- curred in less than nn hour doing properly damage to sev- eral automobiles. Chief Lester has requestiil pedestrians, especially old peo- ple and children, to watch for cars as they cannot be stopped, quickly on the glassy slick streets. WASHINGTON. Feb. states showed a "natural increase" in civilian population which exceeded their contribu- tions to the armed forces between April 1, 1940 and July 1, 1045. the census bureau reported today. Natural increase was defined as the excels of births over were almost completely deaths. It does not cover chang- deadlocked and "the matter will es due to migration. definitely go to ;hc security coun- I... Cil." tion of French and British troops from tllL' Levant, appeared likely contribu- to before the council how- t----- ever before it concludes its win- ter session. A Lebanese delegate said ne- gotiations lor an outside settle- ment were almost completely The. nine, described by the bu- reau as states "with high rates of natural were lisled as North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alanarna. Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mex- ico and Utah. l 1st. which for a month was the bull that brought a world record price in auction, forgot to duck and was knocked from his cham- pionship position Supreme' Champion PiUodri Upright when he sold to Ralph L. Smith of Sny- j for a record price of I t'> SI] l rntli D i n li a n d 1 t; Thursday and I tlv cloudy and with light t. ram in southeast; tonight m i-x- 111; in we..t and tcrnpcia- partly 7 I The new chatr.pior horn bull inld at PCI at an auction in was a short- 'crth. Scotland. .............e. The record price includes all breeds of cattle i W. A. (Ons) IJclanev, jr., rent Mr. Smith a win- congratulating i him on his inncha.se of a fine animal. 1 Del Xrntn Has Brother I he Laxv D Ranch, former .home of Del Zento 1st, has some- jthini: new in the Hereford cattle me to new son has been born to T. It. Lady Rupert 4th, dam of Del Zento. the young bull lias not been nam- ed, but is a full brother to Del Mr. Deianey said Wednes- day morning that the bull is an even better calf than Del Zento was when ho was dropped. Sister To Shows Soon A full sister to Del Zento is also at the ranch. Mr. Deianey said that she would be shown at various shows Ibis fall. She is the second calf nf the now famous Mie and dam of Del Zento. The dam of the new calf and of Del wji-f dropped Oct. 5. j has produced three calves and is a daughter of T. Royal Rupert 15th. International Cii-iind champion, and a grand- j daughter of Rupert (list, [who was also an International Cirand Chmpion. The Lady lias a chance of being the highest producing animal in the world. Shr- has a good start as one of her three offsprings set a world record, which stood for more than a nioi.Ui! Mr. Deianey said that lie is well pleased with the offspring FORMER SAILOR. BRIDE ADMIT TIII-1FT OF AL'TO POPLAR BLUFF. Mo., Feb. 13. A Tulsa. former sailor and his bride of three wen- prison senten- ces by Circuit Judge Randolph today on a plea of guilty well pleased with the offspring1, today on a plea of guilty of Del Zento. A bull and a heif- I. l ft "f an for use er were dropped recently and >m hcncymoon. They were listed in court as Jim Mor- t I C both of them are better animals than Del Zento was when he ar- rived. i Beau Zcnlo Mlb, outstanding herd sire at Ibc Lazy D Ranch, is j the (lam of the famous Del and is not for sale at any price. Mr. Deianey said that he re- ceived a lettci- from Mr. Hlack, of S. Africa, who purchased one of the bulls sold in the annual sale of Lazy D cattle, telling him how much trouble he had gone through trying to get a bid on Del He added that his bid would not have bought the ani- mal. ton, 111, and Helen Baki-r Morton. 17. Morton drew a three-year sentence and his bride two years William M. Pitts, III, who was with them, was given four year term. The autuiimhile, officers said, was sti-len from Ilarnev Hughes at on Feb. t forces was estimated by the bureau as No figure was for overseas forces. The actual census figures of total population for April 1 1940 were 131.tfeD.275. __ __ ___ __ KANSAS CITY. Feb. 13 A snowstorm and a behind- schedtilc tram were taken in stride today by a happy group of British war brides who stopped in Kansas City en route to new homer, in Kansas and other i places farther west. Ickes Successor Known as Liberal WASHINGTON. Feb. L. Chapman, who takes over the affairs of the interior department as acting secretary, is a foloradan. long identified politically as a liberal. Chapman has been an assist- ant interior secretary 13 years. This is the longest tenure o'f anv member of the so-called "little cabinet." A native of Omega, Halifax I mmty, Va., Chapman served in the navy in the first world war and went to Denver to recuper- ate after being invalided out of service. He has long been iden- tified with Colorado politics. COMMITTEE SAYS CCC OPEN TO GRAFT WASHINGTON, Feb. senate agriculture com mittee, which probing matters j of food production and consump- tion, issued an interim report to day asserting that the Com- modity Credit Corporation is so organized is to be open lo "grafl collusion and The report, presented lo Ihe senate by Chairman Elmer Thomas called for a reconsideration of proposed ceil- ing on r.vc, for an end tn use of CCC funds "in connection with private and for public report.? from the grain branch of the CCC on day-to-dav sales. WICHITA, Kas.. Feb. of n small special package received at bis sent Wayne J. Lan- nmg, 42, a rent examiner for the Office of Price Administration, to the hospital today for treat- ment of band and bead injuries H. O. Davis, OPA district di- rector, said representatives of his office were checking into the in- cident and that police also were called to invesligale. Grealer returns for amount in- News Classified Ads' moved in from the north durintf Wednesday. Wind blew furiously about 3 to 4 a.m. and Ada soaked with 1.05 inches of rain, in a short time. Hints of a major snowfall came along m the morning with fine flakes peppering the city, but it wasn't until the noon hour that the clouds got down to bust, ness and soon had snow whitten- ing the landscape. Driving Hazardous Driving was mndu hazardous by ice on windshield and stoam- ed-over ear windows, and pedes- trians were forced to watchful care in downtown crossings. Ilr Snow. rain, ice and combination or singly covered; most of Oklahoma today, making highways dangerous and causing some trouble to communications lines. High winds also were reported from manv points but the only place wind caused much was at Ardmor- where a tornado struck in tliu early morning hours of darkness: injuring 15 persona and wrecking niany houses. Airline service was disrupted and some American Airlines planes were rerouted. Sleet At Bartlesville A full blown sleet storm, driv. en by a norlh wind, was reported at Bartlesville at 10 o'clock. Ear- lier there had been cjnly misting rain, freezing on shrubbery and (Continued on Page 2. Column 1) TH' PESSIMIST Gather Harp i.i some o' movin' t' th' hotel, on account o' 'is wife dis- 'im ever' mornin' when she Rits up t' go t' work. Ever'body in a k e s mis- takes, but, o' course, you make fewer than anybody else.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication