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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 11, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 11, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             The Military which tried wo. hf. nic.r t, him than th. on. that tried Gen. Yoma.hi.a-he's be executed as a soldier, by and Y.m.shita is to be hung. lair mill niiiil this aftrrnnnii; in- crraMiii; rlir.iilini-s tonight with lisht rain likely late tonight THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA. OKLAHOMA. MONDAY, FKHKUAHY 11, Gen. Homma Sentenced To Be Shot Military Court Reaches Verdict; Notorious Jap Joins Yamashita in Prison By PA II, MANILA. MASON n._ ,_ u. -i tjy H ely Homma was sen- i to be- :hot. convict- a tribunal of war ly including the Hat, .an death march. war. moved imnir- t i I.-.i.-oti prisoner of war or.r. wliere lie .'ii.m-il Mirer: .--or as supreme i nmmandi r c.f the Philippines the palmv days of Jap- jine.-r Lt. Gen. Torno- vui.i and ten other criminals. Scouts' Trail' Show All Ready Now Visitors to See Amazing Demonstration of Their Versatility. Skills You are hours nre. 1 from 7 to 10 o'clock i the Hoy Scout "Trail to Citizen- j ship" at Convention hall. I The hummel-inn and moving about of materials for booths and for almost three dozen entries from as many Scout and Cub organizations n s completed Monday morning and the spa- cious hall is all in readiness for the doors to open. Scouts and Cubs have been bu.sv selling tickets for the Merit Badge show and some of them have been practicing diligently on the demonstrations which will surprise many a guest to- night who isn't familiar with what Scouts do and study. The 'program 'is entirely in- formal. Visitors can stay all of the time the show is open or can move through and see some motion and then leave. Thr boys will display a sur- prisingly varied talent in electri- city, ramping, nature, business, i planes, poultry. Indian lore, ear- pentry. photography, signaling. woodwork. First Aid, soil con- servation and other skills that have practical application as well as training in learning these fields. Special movies will be display- ed in the BPW clubroom and the Jaycccs rooms of the same build- ing. Deal at Yalta On Kurile Islands Bared Full Agreement Published, Giving Three Conditions For Red Entry in Jap War While hearing h i s sentence. stood in almost the exacl spot :n the ballroom of thr for- mer home of the United States c-orv.n-.i.-.Moncr to the Philippines v. here, and arrogant after the Japanerf conquest of the islands-, he had received the the puppet Filipino corrriiiM :on and collaborators in a xvidcly-pubhcK-rd reception. Within the range of his vision. a' hi- befoir. thr five-man (oir.mi-: ion. acror.s Manila Bay was th" fortrr-s i oci: of Corrrgi- the hills f! fi-uiii which he had Gtn. Jonathan M. Wain- .M.ij. Gen. Kdwarri P. King ar.ci their force.: along the f-n-.-.-orchcd ui.id.; in the m- death march. He'll Srntrncr The conviction mi Mir- pr.se. had expected to s.-.i.i. ruder prevailed at the i.s it bad through the triH.'. -.ip.ci'-r the MITII discipline bald, bc.-pcctaclcd Gen. Lee Donovan. commission prcsi- Kramer Does No! Remember Tip-Off Message on P. H. WASHINGTON. Feb. Congressional investigators heard today that a woman civil- ian in the navy department trans- lated on Dec. HHI. a Japanese spy's message setting up code signals to report movements of the U. S. fleet at Pearl Harbor. Senator Ferguson (R-Mich) brought out in his questioning of naval Capt. Alwin D. Kramer that a Mrs. L'dgers. employed in Kramer's department, had made a rough translation of such a mes- sage the day before the Japanese attacked. The senate-house investigating committee was told that the wo- man translator testified at a pre- vious hearing that when she fin- ished the dralt shortly after noon, it went ID Kramer. But Kramer said today he could not remember seeing it until December H. "If you had seer, that Ferguson saul, "it would have tipped you off that Pearl Harbor was in danger if there was going to be an attack. You would have By GRAHAM HOVEY WASHINGTON. Feb. clamped three condi- tions, including outright Soviet possession of Ihc Kurilr islands, on its agreemcnl at Yalta one year ago today to enter the Pa- cific war. This conditional aspect of Gen- eral Stalin's pledge to fight Jap- an was disclosed when the text of the long-secret Big Three pact on the far cast was made public today in Washington, London and Moscow. Secretary of State Byrnes re- portedly has insisted it is the last of the wartime arrangements of its kind withheld from publi- cation. Yalta secrets previously bared promised Hussia Anglo- American support for the Hig power veto in thr United Na- tions securitv council and for separate UNO memberships for fivelo-Russia and the Soviet Ukraine. Atom Bomb Not Factor Under the agreement made public today, Russia was to join the far eastern fight "in two or three months after Germany has surrendered." This appeared to spike finally earlier speculation that the dropping of the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima Aug- ust 8 prompted Russia to ad- vance the dale of its war declar- ation. Germany quit May 7 and Rus- sia declared war on Japan Aug- ust 8. Kurile- Deal Blunt The reference to the Kuriles in the Yalta pact was blunt: "The Kurile islands shall be handed over to the Soviet union." The other two conditions for Russia s w a r against Japan, agreed to by President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill were: 1. The status of the Mongolian people's republic in outer Mon- golia should remain unchanged Back To Pre-1304 2. Rights held by Russia prior lo "the treacherous attack of Japan in 1904" should be restor- ed. These, thp pact said, were: Rc-toriition to Hussia of south- ern Sakhalin and adjacent islands. Internationalization of the port FIVE CENTS THE COl'Y I, seven of their eight children at their home in CI. vc- laiid Ohio, be.oie he left for Camp Attrrlnirv, Ind.. after n -enlisting in the annv His lo'al income r servinq overseas will amount to year. Anythony Jr.. Abbie. 10 Sgt' i M '1; 5' 1- Churchill Slays In D. C. Silent to Press, Talks With Truman, Visits in British Embassy of Daircn and restoration of "the Russian lease on Port Arthur Joint Ru.ssinn-Chini.ic admin- istration of the Chinese-Kaslern and South-Manchurian railways which provide an outlet to Dai- ren. In these projects, the "prcem- merit interests of the Soviet i union would be safeguarded the pact said, adding that China I should retain "full sovereignty" WASHINGTON. Feb. Chui chill today post- poned Jiis return to sunny Flor- ida until tomorrow and settled down in the snow-clad Hritish embassy to rer.t and talk with tin- Ear! of Halifax, his old friend and retiring Pritish ambassador to the United States. The embassy jaid that the for- mer prime minister had no defin- ite plans for the day and no con- ferences scheduled. Washington still wondered whether tin; sudden flight was prompted by protocol, Britain's new labor government, or just plain pleasure. The wartime leader remained mum. He told the Earl of Hali- fax, British ambassador, he did Much Dust But Arabs Oppose No Dust Bowl, State Men Say York Site Philadelphia Traffic Hit By Strike Autos, Pedestrians Jam Streets as Trolleys, Buses, Subway Arc Idle PHILADELPHIA. Feb. j a m in e d down- town streets and thousands of suburbanites flocked to railroad stations today as a strike of employes of the Philadelphia Transit company paralyzed tran- sit facilities for daily passengers. Hosts of police-men were re- quired to handle the tremendous flow of traffic. Residents of out- lying areas lid it took an hour and a half to drive what was nor- mally a HO-mmule trip. Pedestri- ans clogged sidewalks in Ihe cen- tral city area, dodging cars to cross streets. Stalled in picketed carbarns were trolley cars, buses, subway and elevated trains and trackless The strike began at one minute after midnight, but some of the transit workers headed for car- barns as .is p.m. last night. Collapse Local Transport Workers union of Am.-rica ordered While House Says Steel Formula Near Also Admits Officially Changes in Prospect for Top Administration WASHINGTON, Feb. White House said official- ly for Ihe first lime today that changes are in prospect in top administration personnel and in- dicated announcement of a for- mula for settling the steel strike was imminent. Press Charles G. Ross told a news conference, in reply to questions, that person- nel changes "are in but he declined to elaborate. Asked whether they had to do with the stabilization higli com- mand, he left it for reporters to use their own phraseology. At the same time, Ross said: Will "Trll All" Argue With U. S. Depart- ment', Report Nothing Like 'Black Blizzards' Of Decade Ago "When and if a st.-.-l srlllrmrnt is announced, there will be a full .___.............explanation of all tin- mathema- thc strike upon collapse of ne- i entering into it." Initiations fyr -i -a-cents-an-hour Ross said the aiinounci-mcnt wage increase; and 27 other de- would come from the White mamls. The company offered a i House. Asked whether such an an- nouncement was not already pre- pared, he merely smiled. to whether there would be a formal not want to talk to the press upon Spectators, all considered it important, wouldn't services, Red Cross I in Manchuria. Chinese Deal Ratified a largf number of wi-.'i had lived in the f'.-ea llumma's occupation, y.rrc before to the crounds. :n the same he: ringbone suit and tan he l-.ad woi n during the I'-ci quickly away after and were A.-. Hodgin. military '.vhi> c an atc'i staff membrr in Idaho, r.-.coited lloiiima to on P; Column 1) Five Die in State Highway Accidents Three Youths of Okmulgcc Killed When Cor Hits Abutment at Bridge llr IN- Inlril _Fivc were killed in highway accidents Sunday bringing the state's traf- fic death toll to If) for the first ;0 days of J-V-bruary. The fjcure compares with eight -or :he corresponding period last T.-..-CC persons were killed south of Okmiilgce when the in which they were into an abutment over Deep Fork "If I had seen it that Saturday afternoon, I most certainly would have, yes Ki inner replied. Kramer said he recalled work- ing over the message several days, clearing up after he first saw it December 8. Senator LUCKS (D-I11) proposed today that Pearl Harbor invest- gators summon Adm. Leigh Noy- es, chief of naval communica- tions, to gel .it the bottom of the "winds" message. "I am convinced Admiral Noy- es holds the key to this Lucas told a reporter as the lengthy bearings entered what may be their final week. The Illinois senator said it seemed likely that Noycs. as chief of the intelligence branch, might force-; be expected to most about the Japanese "weather report" which is supposed lo have had the code mc-aning that intcrna- lional relations were in danger, war was imminent. The agreement, acknowledging that Generalissimo Chiang Kai- Shek would have to concur in the outer Mongolia, Daircn, Port Arthur and railroad arrange- ments, said: "The president (Mr. Roosevelt) will take measures in order to obtain this concurrence on ad- vice from Marshal Stalin." Those agreements later were ratified in a Russian-Chinese 30- year treaty of friendship and al- linncc. Signed in Moscow last August 14. In the Yalta agreement. Rus- sia expressed its readiness to conclude such a treaty with China "in order to render assist- ance to China with its armed for the arrival. And he sped quickly past newsmen waiting in the snow outside the White House gate after his talk with the pres- ident last night The storm meanwhile raised the likelihood Mat acquaintances in congress would seek Church- ill's views, oublicly or privately, on Anglo-American affairs. Right at the top of these would i be the projected loan to Britain. There has been some speculation that it was this question that brought Churchill here at a time when congression- al approval of th.- grant remained far from certain. The White House said that President Truman's conference with Churchill late last dealt almost wholly with a cussion of plans for Churchill's speech at Full-in. Mo. March 5. Press Secretary Charles G. i Ross told reporters the two "did not discuss liny political mat- ters" and that the pending agree- ment for a loan to Britain was not mentioned. TOPKKA. Kas.. Feb. There's plenty of dust in western Kansas and Oklahoma these days it's not al! on the but recent dust "storms" are nothing compared to the black which made this area a dustbowl nearly a decade ago. "That's the consensus of opin- ion among many farmers who stuck it out through those trying times when dust and sand drift- ed high on their fences and bur- ied their rrop.4. The U. S. department of agri- culture said in Washington last week that a new dust bowl ap- pealed to be forming in the west- ern Kansas and Oklahoma red- lands. But state agriculture offi- other hardy .1 Oklahomans and Kan.sans say no tllc! "Ilolilln? Their Own" It's'dry. all right, and tin- riv- ers aren't too h-gh. and once in awhile a little Oklahoma dust blows into Kan.sa.'V-or vice versa Hut on the Say Will Fight to Last Against Spot for Head- quarters of UNO LONDON. Feb. Arab stales served notice today they would fipht to the last i against New York as United Na- lions hc.idquartrrs. objecting to j "some political influences" there. Iraq and Saudi Arabia both j protested the New York selection J as a special committee of the Uni- ted Nation.-; general assembly I slowly neare.l thr point of voting on a proposal that New York should becom-- temporary head- quarters, with n permanent site to be picked from the Wcstches- ter-Fairficld counties region to the northeast. The Philippine commonwealth and Australia went on record against this location for the per- manent site. Col. W. R. Hodgson of Australia the recommen- dation for it had "caused a sense of resentment and injustice throughout United States." The Arabians did not defin 12-crnt boost. Failing in last minute peace- j making efforts. Howard T. Col- vin. assistant director of the U. S. conciliation .service, said he would hold conferences with I "5SS said PTC and union representatives "until a settlement is reached." Be Calm, frees Mayor Mayor Bernard Samuel told m an early-morn- ing broadcast to "be calm'and co- operate so as to prevent disord- er." All policemen in Ihe cily were ordered to work every day for (Continued on Page 5. Column 7) GMlteadllayrciO Original Demand Came at Bad Time the political influences they dis- liked. Their chief concern rx- whole. they reported, Pressed in behind the scenes con- tney are holding their own." I versations. h.nvever, was that Oklahoma City reports were to New York has a large Jewish the effect that winds in the pan- population. The Arabs and Jews handle hardly had scratched the currently ari in controversy over surface of sonv.- storms around Palestine, liuymon 10 years ago. Around Pratt. Kas.. where wheat damage apparently was greatest last Tuesday, some fields were denuded of all vegetation. Del Goyen and Jack Lemon, Pratt farmers, both reported ex- tensive damage through erosion. Abdul Mouinm Al-baih of Sau- di Arabia told the committee, shortly before it adjourned un- til 3 p.m. (CSTl that he and oth- ers would liky tr. see a unanim- ous decision on the site issues He made it clear that Saudi Ara- bia did not agree to place a place iK.ht Dwight Thompson said his wheat i with a "partisan" atmosphere be- dis- was covered with dust and would ca Young Adans Face Charges on Auto Accused of Taking Stolen Car from Fort Worth To Shreveport The Information has been locally that a Ifi-ycar received old boy 37. B.-tty J.-.nc V.'ellingham. M. ar.it Stafford R. Brewer, all of Okrr.ulgre. Dt-lbert William Longcer. Q.J; m a mvolvinc three auto- r.ortiv .iM of Kellyville. Al.x of Gore, in c.iuntv. in the In- ho.-p.ta! Tahlequah last of icceivcd when !.e struci; by an automobile a? hi- c.-u.-M-il a bridge near Web- bers Fall.-. brothers. Jess. 22. ind :aid the auto-' not ;top. Klizabeth Kl- fnci 15-year old girl compan- ion, who allegedly drove a stolen car from Fort Worth, Tex., to Shrevcport last Monday have been charged with violating the federal motor theft act. They were released nn S300 bond. The vouths. Sol Jones. 16, and Jewel C. Arnold. 15. both of Ada, 1 were arrested Monday night af- ter an automobile accident in (lie car was wrecked. The boy is reported to have I been taken to a hospital at I Shreveport recovering from a head wound suffered in an ac- cident. I Local Authorities say that another boy was along. Apparently as additional in- surance that the terms of the Yalta agreement would not be misunderstood, the text near the end said "Ihe heads of the three great powers have agreed that these claims of the Soviet Union shall he unquestionably fulfilled after Japan has been "defeated Reason For In a stalcmcnt accompanying the text, first dis- closed existence of the agree- ment at a news conference last September there was good reason why Ihe pact was marked "top secret." If the Japanese had learned of the agreement, they would have immediately atlacked Russia, Byrnes declared. This, he said, would have made Ihe task of the American armies that-much more difficult and cost more lives. Byrnes reiterated in the stale- mcnt that he learned of the German Civilians Resenting Trial Don't Like Indictment Of SS and SA Outfits FRANKFURT. Germany, Feb. American 'a r m y poll disclosed today that German civilians resent the trial of Nazi organizations at Nuernberg. Except for a communist maj- or, all questioned objected to the indictment of organizations such as Ihc SS and SA. on trial with 22 of the leading Nazi survivors. The poll as made public by the information control division showed a fairly sustained inter- est in the Nuernberg proceedings and some feeling that all the defendants should not be con- victed. Rudolf Hess was named most frequently by those Ger- mans in the minority which claimed that not all the leaders were guilty. Others mentioned ause of the presence of particu- l-'ir political groups. France ptvviously had con- demned New York as a place where strong political pressures would be brought against UNO, but a French motion to delay se- lection of require moisture to prevent smothering. Kansas Say- "Not Yet" Western newspaper ed- itors joined m a chorus of "not yet" to the government's predic- tions of a IK-W dust bowl. Their reports showed; At Hutchison, Kas., were nothing like tin.- York, failed "Anything can happen: there's day. always that prospect, but it hasn't Now before the committee is a yet. A little -now or rain would Netherlands proposition to take New York .is1 a temporary site, with a permaivnt location' to bn DETROIT. V.-b. 11. ident C. K. Wilson of General Motors corporation today told a national labor relations board hearing that at the time the Uni- ted Automobile Workers (CIO) madi its original wage demand "we were in a bad position to move intelligi-ntly in any direc- tion." Wilson, testifying in an NLRB hearing in wrich GM is charged by the union tnat it failed to bar- gain in good fnith. volunteered the statement trial examiner Gerard D. Reilly questioned him about the time that had elapsed between th- union's original de- mand and the corporation's reply. Reilly pointed out that the un- ion originally proposed a 30 per cent i-n-rease August 18. ISMS, in a letter to GM. The cor- poration replied Oct. 3. "At that time it had never been more difficult to foresee the fu- ture." Wilson declared. "We were wading through a period of loss- es. Car prices were all out of gear, we wen; in a bad position to move intelligently in any di- rection." Wilson fuviv exchanged good-i natured quips with the trial ex- as thr I ainmrr and NLHB attorney Har- ....i I ..I.I .11 permanent sit opening stroke against the peiid- i old Craivjfield. ing recommend.-.tion for New At one- point Cranefield sugges- of approval Satur- i ted to Reilly that the witness br admonished and asked to refrain make a world of difference. At Liberal. Kas.. "The dust was east :md north. For the most part wheat looks good." At Dodge City, "Some damage on high ground. Noth- ing, however, to approach dam- age a decado i.po. More dry wea- ther with high winds might prove serious later." Ada to Be Honored On Radio Broadcast C. R. Anthony Program Over Five Stations in Two States on Ada Tuesday JWEATHERJ Oi'.lahomn Fair mild tins afternor.n; increasing cloud-, mess tonight light rain like- ly late ttjninht east and central portior.r: mostly cloudy! t'-.-c.-.M'inal "i.un ca: t and Central I r.f. colder panhandle in af- VISITING SHANGHAI SHANGHAI, Feb., II. Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek landed at Lungwa airport today on his first visit to this metro- polis since the outbreak of Ihe Sino-Japanesc war in 1937. Xo fanfare marked Chiang's arrival. He was mel by Madame Chiang, who came to Shanghai earlier from Chungking, and by Mayor Chicn Ta-Chun. ils existence. President Trumnn disclosed last month that he had been in- formed of its terms shortly be- fore leaving for the Big three conference in Potsdam last Julv Rep. Hebert (D.-La.) said in an interview Saturday that Byrnes had given him both oral and written assurances that no other secret agreements of the cd were former Foreign Min- ister Konstantin Von Neurath Dr. Hjalmar Schacht. Franz Von Papon, Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitcl, Grand Adms. Erich Har- der and Karl Doenitz and Col Gen. Alfred Jodl. RRITISII WOMKN ASK CHANCE IN COURT LONDON, kind exist. Hebert, who bad sug- I J'esentatives Feb. of approximately gester a search of both White -00 British wives whose Ameri- House and state department files, can soldier husbands are seeking saidi he w.is "reasonably satis- to divorce them hope to have fled with the secretary's reply j M''s- Eleanor Roosevelt inter- I cede in their behalf so they can CHICKASHA, Feb.. 11, ._ Chickasha citizens will vote to- morrow on a bond issue to be used to purchase buildings and facilities of the government flying school here. -K- Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. obtain passage to the United States and defend the suits. A leader for the group, which has organized under the title of the Married Women's Associa- tion, said she hoped to obtain an interview with Mrs. Roosevelt, who is in London as a UNO dele- gate. The city of Ada will be hon- ored Tuesday morning on the C. R. Anthony company program broadcast over fivv large radio stalions in Oklahoma and Texas. At a.m., radio station KVOO in Tulsa will lead off with a salute to Ada in which out- standing points of the city will be broadcast as well as the names of several prominent city residents and officials. The gram is called "Neighbor An- thony." Then, at "The Anthony Ranchers" with a program orig'- inatmg at WKY in Oklahoma City will add their salute to Ada. This program is also sent In- direct wire to KTOK, Oklahoma Cily: KWFT, Wichita Falls, and KCRC. Enid. Thus during n 30 minuter, five large radio will devote part of the Anthony radio pro- gram to broadcasting good points of Ada, according to W. J. Dillon, local Anthony man- ager. chosen later in the Fairfield- Westrhestcr regions of New York and Connecticut. Dog Killed Here Wat Feared Mad Acted Strangely, Attacked Other Dogs, Was Killed Sunday Night A dog was killed about mid- night Sunday night after acting i in a way that made residents of I northeast Ada worry about pos- sibility the animal had rabies. E. M. Ferguson, noi East Gar- radio dt'i'a. shot the dog after it had attacked two been driven away, returning an hour later and renewing the attack. Neighbors reported to Fergu- son that the dog. a stranger in the. neighborhood, had attacked their dog also, and had acted queerly. Now Fergusons and others are endeavoring to get a checkup on the dog and also to suggrst to others in that neighborhood that they pen up dogs until such time as indications of rabies would develop in them, also to have their children be careful about from volunteering objections and arguments which do not happen to occur to tin- union's counsel and that he be asked only to ans- wer While the NLRB hearing was in progress, union and company officials wont back to their tiations in the 83-day GM strike. MrsJohiTHundley Dies at Calvin Family to Calvin in 1902, Has Been Prominent In Area Many Years announcement today, he did not know but he repeated that changes in per- sonncl are in prospect. Asked about a possibility that John C. Collet will retire a's eco- nomic stabilized and be succeed- ed bv OPA Administrator Chi-s- tcr Bowles with broadened au- thority over pricing, Ross sim- ply said there was nolhing offi- vial yet on any personnel changes. "Any possibility of action on that a reporter asked. He replied in the affirmative. Didn't Talk Personnel "On personnel a re- porter asked, lioss said yes. The president talked for more than an hour with his congres- sional leaders without ing the prospective personnel changes. Senate Majority Leader Bark- Icy. Kentucky, said the president told this group that he had the whole ceononiy situation and all its implications under review, "but didn't say anything about any reorganization." Barkley was accompanied to the White House by House Speaker Rayburn, House Major, ily Leader McCormick (Ma.vs.) and Senator McKellar (D.-Tenn.) president pro tcmpre. Barkley said most of the dis- cussion was devoted to pending administrative proposals, includ- ing the proposed loan to Great Britain and continuance of OPA. FKPC Hill Omitted He said I lie proposal for a mnnent fair employment prac- tices commission, which was shelved Saturday after beinR blocked by a filibuster in senate, was not mentioned. Barkley reiterated his belief that the president will sign the proposed substitute for his orig- inal "full employment" bill. He said the president has not yet received the substitute bill passed by thr senate and housa last week but that hi? is "very well pleased" with the compro. misc. Clouds, Rain Due In State Tonight tlr Thr Clouds and drizzling rain are expected to move into Oklahoma tonight after a relatively pleasant day. the federal weather bureau said today. The stati; wide forecast called for the rain to reach Oklahoma some time tonight and continue over the state through tomorrow. Temperatures over the state dur- expcctcd to and 40 dc- Mrs. John W. Hundley, one of the best known and best loved women in this part of the stale, died at her home in Calvin Sun- day night. Funeral services will be held from the Methodist church in Calvin Tuesday afternoon at o'clock, with burial to follow in thr Calvin cemetery. Survivors are her husband. John W. Hundley: one son. Wei- don Hundley: and one daughter. Mrs. A. E. Anglm. all of Calvin. The Hundleys came to Calvin in 1002 and have lived there since that time. Mr. Hundley is one of the leading merchants of this part of Oklahoma and is a large land owner in the Calvin area. ing the night are range between 32 grees. Highcsl temperature in state yesterday was 55 at Way. noka. Guymon had Ihc low "of 17 earlv lodav. Greater returns for amount News Classified Ads. Read the Ada News Want Adj. other dogs go mad. ANDERSON TURNS DOWN MILLERS' PLEA ON FLOUR WASHINGTON. Feb. of Agriculture An- derson today-rejected a plea of the milling industry that volun- tary rationing of white flour be substituted for government plans to put the nation on dark bread. i CHICKASHAr Feb., 11, (.-n_ I Cry of Chickasha youth for a teen town is being heard. The senior high school unit of the P-TA was the first organiza- tion to approve the project. The junior chamber of commerce fol- lowed suit and named a commit- tee to cooperate in a citywide movement. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified TH' PESSIMIST Jr. Th' human machine is only machine, in th' world that makes more noise when it'.i well oiled. A lot o' fellers who thought the'r wives couldn't Kit along without 'em ought f ECC 'em after they've sons.   

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