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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 10, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 10, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             There are various Clear to partly cloudy Sunday and Monday; u.irmer Sunday; much volilrr .Monday THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd IMS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1'JIG Stalin Blames Capitalism For War, Lists New Goals LONDON, Feb. 9. Generalissimo declaring the last two wars resulted from sian worker's standard of living would be raised Declaring that the war was "the inevitable world economic of monopoly war could have surpass those distribution Sets' be' not mention atomic research twecn the countries existed in accordance with their economic needs, in the way of coordinated under the present 'd economy. Thus thc development the first war In a pre-election speech broadcast by the oMh'e ..lo.-cow radio. Soviet chieftain promised "iocn rationing will and that the Rus- (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) New Housing Program Draws Wide Acclaim Over Country Congress, Construction Industry Behind Most of Plon With Opposition to Ceiling Prices on Old Dwellings WASHINGTON, Feb. for Ameri- ca's biggest home-building in two wide acclaim today and a Ict's-get-going attitude in congress New Cold Due Late Today Freakish Mixture Of Weather Here Saturday W FIVE CENTS THE COPY Gotham Fears Health Peril 'Lady Soldiers" Arrive From Pacific City Ready to Seise Any Building for Emergency Hospital as Fuel Dwindles NEW YORK. Feb.. 9. board of health today ordered the seizure of any building in New York necessarily for use as a hospital in a move to meet what it said was "a state of great, im- minent and increasing peril" to tliej health of the city's millions. I he action came as persons seeking priorities to purchase fuel oil, cut off from the city by the six-day-old tugboat "strike, thronged police headquarters where an emergency ration board began operations at noon. Ration Fuel Oil Carefully igid rationing of existing stockpiles of fuel oil was ordered by, Mayor William O'Dwycr to _ _ avoid what he called a possible Leaves Some Snow as Trace I "epidemic of respiratory illness and the construction industrv. Filing Time Now for Ada City Election It's tirr.c ti Mail thinking about tre coming city elections, for the Ternary is fchedtilcd for March I' and the run-off, if one is r.rrcscarv. on April 2. at '.in v have onlv until March P v? Me. j r.ev can file with Jne Beck. v. ho is secretary of the Pontotoc rour.ty election board, or. if he :s of town as hr- is part of tr.e.Ume in his business, they can j'-ave their filing papers with Claude Bobbitt. county clerk. Registration for the city pri- r-arv will begin Feb. 19 and will continue for 20 davs. With the program less than a j day old, both Republicans and Democrats in congress appeared solidly behind most of the plan. Some of them already were pitching into the legislative end, but the proposal for price ceil- I ings on old homes and building lots was far from having uni- versal support. Approval Is General Messages offering warm praise and offers of cooperation poured in on housing Administrator Wil- son S. Wyatt, who drew up the plan, and on President Truman, already arrived who endorsed and announced it. e contemplating They came from housing, labor nf the races for j and farm organizations, from reminded mayors, veterans, and indivi duals. The program calls for build ing some worth o. new homes in the next two All's Ready Now For Scout Merit Badge 'Trail' Show arrangements have been for the Boy Scout Bailee H-.O-.V known as the to Citizenship" to be held f. trie Convent.on Hall Monday r..cr.t at according to A. R. chairman. years, mostly by private firms Most of the houses would sell for no more than SG.OOO or rent for no more than a month. Subsidies Suggested To accomplish it, Wyatt saic there would be needed a tre- mendous expansion- in the out- put of building materials, three times the labor force now work- ing on home construction, and in some cases, government sub- sidies for wages and prices. The banking committee al- ready has approved an emer- gency housing and voted against putting ceilings on old dwellings. Wolcott suggested this bill might be amended to meet most of the legislative needs listed for the new program. Two Parts Draw Objection Rep. Patman (D.-Tex.) was readying an amendment to cover at least part of the Wyatt plan. For thc most part, the housing or j mu .ie will be sup >lied i -a Eslatc Boards disapproved bv A-la bmHi m! m'lce control provisions. The Producers f'minril Tno r.'-r the and KADA from i'H.ri to p.m. Special tn be shown at rr-, 1 Producers Council, Inc., rep- f t e oimv ''cscntinK materials manufactu, uii Mum i subsidies to expand >l. lion production of supplies. It recommended a 10 per cent in- crease in prices of materials in- ui JIIU let 1UIS in- lumber inter- p. i-, i it Bllau- "t-'.si coasi lumcer inter- T'-vl to cl price -The in .Se President Asking Food Cooperation lie smiwn in the BPW .it hall. hi.otii t.. the visit- f at .Merit Hadgesliow ''.I mi camping bv i will lie placed I With a new cold wave due to arrive in the state late todav, Ada had got by Saturday with "a mixture of weather elements but without severe cold or heavy, staving snow. Sleet, snow, rain, sunshine were mingled into a day of fre- quent change, with snow dom- inant and falling into early night. Temperatures, though chilly, remained high enough that the snow melted nn walks and streets, finally blanketing the remainder of the scene. No Additional Moisture Due The Associated Press reports the federal weather forecaster as predicting new cold but with- out additional moisture. Snow ranging up to six inches at h redcrick thawed rapidly Sat- urday with mild temperatures prevailing over the state. The freak storm extended from Okla- homa City southwest to Altus and eastward as far as Poteau with freezing rain and snow re- ported in southeast Oklahoma. Light snow also fell late yes- terday in Ardmore, where icy highways were reporter earlier in the day. Wheat Belt Still Dry Skies will be mostly fair with a few clouds in the Oklahoma City area Sunday, the weather bureau said. Mild temperatures will be replaced late todav by cold and by Monday it will be much colder in west and north portions. The snow welcomed by farmers but in the northwest wheat belt fields remained dry. Woodward and Ponca City re- ported cloudless skies Saturday. Massey in Major Building Purchase Ado Man Buyt 75-Foot Frontage Including An- thony Store Building First major local property leal of this year is the purchase of the 75-front building in the 100 block on Main now oc- and disease." Board of health members said that if the fuel shortage were not relieved, there would be "dis- comfort, distress and suffering and an increase in illness, and deaths, particularly among in- fants, the infirm and the Insufficient city Was "browned out" Wednesday when O'Dwycr declared a state o disruption o. transportation because of a lack of fuel might rcsuit in civil dis- order, adding further danger to life and health, the board mem- bers said. Seized Tugboat's Idle The city's government-seized fleet of 400 tugboats lay idle for the sixth day despite O'Dwytr's call on the office of defense trans- portation to man them immedia- tely "regardless of consequences." Forty-four government tugs labored to bring emergency sup- plies by barge from New Jersey terminals during the day an ODT spokesman said seven additional navy tugs arrived from Boston, Philadelphia and Norfolk. Va. Squads of police and city fuel inspectors were stationed at bridges, tunnels and ferries to divert incoming oil trucks to top priority consumers. cupicd by C. R. Anthony com- pany. Hicks Smith and J. Kent Smith and Sons The consideration is reported o have been S34.00C. A few weeks ago an extensive House Reaches For Tighter Hold On Federal Agencies By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON, Feb.. 9. (.Tv_ The house appropriations com- mittee reached out today for a ighter hold on the purse strings >f 41 government corporations, ncluding some of the biggest fin- ancial operators in thc federal amily. It designated five of its mem- bers Reps. Mahon (D-Tcx.J. Whitten (D-Mis-O, Gore (D- Ploeser a n d Jensen a subcom- mittee 1p review annually nil transactions and operations of the agencies. Mahon is chairman of the group. Mahon told reporters the new A happy group of New York WACS is this. They are shown in heir bunks aboard the U. S. S. West Point and smile happilv as i emu Aiiuiu uappiiv as the Army transport pulls into dock with the last contingent of "lady soldiers" from the rr subcommittee will "keep under close and constant congressional scrutiny the activities of govern- ment corporations." The corporations which Ma- of remodeling was bo- I subcommittee will scruti- U.S. to Eat More in '46 But Many Lands "Near Starvation Inventory of World's Larder Makes It Plain Enough Food Exports Will Not Reach Them in Time to Ban Hunger WASHINGTON. Feb. agriculture depart- ment took an inventory in the world's larder tonight and fig- ured that Americans will cat more than ever before in while people in many lands will be "near starvation." A survey of conditions in some 65 countries forecast 12 per cent less food for the average persons in the 1945-46 season than in pre-war years. But few people will be average. The department drew this picture of contrasts: United food supplies x x x continue at record levels, x x x Civilian food consumption per capital in the United States in 194G is expected to exceed that of any previous year, barring unusually poor crops." in several countries arc near starva- ,ion levels." The department said Italy, Germany, French Africa, France, Spain, India and China apparently are he areas with "the most difficult food and bread problem." World grain supply problems were described as "the most difficult" ever recorded. (Continued on Page 12. Column 6) Month-Old Strike In New York Closes Workers Bock to Posts at Monday; Disputed Points To Arbitrator; Turbulence Often Marked Picket Lines NEW YORK, Feb. Union employes voted today to end their turbulent, month-old strike which crippled this city's telegraphic communications with the rest of the nation. Members of the striking American Communications As- sociation (CIO) ratified at a mass meeting a settlement reached yesterday by the company and union leaders and agreed to return to work at a. m. Monday. Seven thousand members the union struck Jan. 8 in pro- test against a national war labor board award of an average wage increase of cents an hour. The union said the grant was a downward revision of a region- al board award and would de- prive members of an- nually. One-Way Deal On Discharges Under the agreement. Sell.v said any union member who ._... ,lulllml OUM.r worked during the strike shall day that each week gets "a little not be discharged, but the un- more hectic" than the last ion shall not be prevented from The president.-addressing per- e.xpelling members for working sonnel heads of the executive de- during the strike. partmcnt and agencies, said he Each Week's More Hectic, Says Truman Feb. President Truman observed After Sclly addressed thc strik- ers from a sound truck in front of the Western Union's main building, hundreds of pickets threw away their placards and left their posts. Throughout the strike the ACA lad maintained continuous picke- :mg by as many as persons. Numerous scuffles between police and pickets over the entry )f non-strikrrs into the Western Jnion main building resulted in tic. has been thinking every week "that perhaps the next week will not be quite so hectic as the week just passed, but the coming week is always just a little more hec- "This is one place." he told the 125 government officials in a dis- cussion of the new civil service appointment pi o g r a m. "where you never lack for action and where there is always a crisis just around the corner and I have some arrests. The comoiiny i to do something about it sought a supreme court injunc- I "But the next day the 'crisis ion against mass picketing, car- is passed, and it's just like yes- rymg a suit before Justice Aaron terday's newspapers. That's trie J" v___. "c gun nn the part of the building low occupied hv Anthony's. Bud Snider Dies In Phoenix, Ariz. Formerly With Father In Shoe Repair Firm Hero A. Snider received n tele- will enter the trie rounds, see and leave y liii-. Scnuts and Cubs have conduct- an ticket sales cam- ...zr.. ;.nd good attendance is cx- .it slow. Says Good Many Ameri- cans Too Fat Anyway WASHINGTON. Feb. President Truman called on the Hvold Vor Amerlcan People tonight to co- u operate in his new food conserv- Cdinmodity Credit Corporation. This involving ex- Intermediate Credit icnditure of will furnish I Haul's, Production Credit Cor- lie store with three floors of! Regional Agricultural on behalf of congress arc: Cram Saturday that his sun, nierchandisi; air condition- ing and other features fit the building for will bi' P Bowles Winning His Hold-Line Fight By STERLING F. GREEN Credit Farmers Corporations............ res that will Home- Corporation, Federal Crop a store that j Insurance Corporation, Federal .'ill be up to date in every dc- Mortage CorporiUinn, Fcd- artment. cral Surplus Commodities Cor- poration, Reconstruction Finance Corporation. Defense Plant Cor- poration, Defense Supplies Cor- poration. Metals Reserve com- pany. Rubber Reserve company War Damage Corporation, Fed- eral National Mortage Associa- C. C. Ray Dies At His Home Saturday Retired Recently After Many Years as Merchant Policeman f t'. Ray. rer.ident of Ada since and merchant policeman for Thursday after an illness of twu r-'i .Mr. Snider was formerly as- urclay afternoon. more than 17 yiar.s. died at his 1 cime. West Tenth, early Sal- Court Name Arbitrator Levy said last night that Wes- ern Union and the strikers had greed to sign the WLB decision vith the understanding that dis- puted provisions would be sub- nitted to a court-appointed ar- 'itraior. Levy said" the com- tany's suit to restrain the union rom picketing would be dismis- ed. He did not name an arbi- rator. The strike affected only em- ployes in the metropolitan area, company and the commer- ial Telegraphers Union (AFL) larcaining agent for employes utside New York, accepted the WLB award last December. Young Men Sweep Miles of Highway After Spilling 250 Bushels Of Corn from Truck At a Bushel KANSAS CITY. Feb.. fl, f.n_ Two young men spent today sweeping a five mile section of a U. S. highway near here. Glenn Neidel. 24. of St. Joseph. Mo., discovered shortly before daylight that the tail gate on his1 truck had given way and he had lost half his pound load of shelled yellow field corn. They spilled 250 bushels at The president addressed the group in the notion picture room of the White House. He spoke in- formally, and the White House later released a transcript ot his remarks. Murray of (10 Is Optimistic About End for Disputes WASHINGTON'. Feb.. 9. Philip Murray, president of the CIO. said today he is "optimistic" about prospect for early settle- ment of most current labor dis- putes. He also told senators, before whom he was testifying on a pro- posed fact-finding bill, that any wage agreement in the steel strike will extend until Feb. 15. 1947. This promoted reporter later to ask whether he expects the steel strike to end by this Feb. 15. next Friday. Murray repli- ed: "You will have to make your own assumption but we've gallon that far in the negotiations." Earlier Murray had testified he had tentative approval from President Benjamin Fairless of U S. Steel for a 19! j cents hourly wage increase for the steel workers when he orde'red Funeral arrangements will be completed alter arrival of several tion. the RFC Mortage company, Disaster Loan Corporation. o. r. INDIANS TIIKKI: IJASUIAI.I. PLAYERS weight if it meant lives of others. sustaining Laseball length on what br to lr. strinif nf 'lo America's duty to pre- i starvation in war-torn coun- WASHINGTON, Feb. n Inland Laterwavs Corporation, OPA Administrator C h e s t e r I Terminal corn- Bowles appeared tonight to be on 'J'c Virgin Islands company. top, at least for the moment in his fight for firm holding of a price line even though it be a line bent upwards to make room us were Raymonn i outfielder formerly ii i'-o i the record. j tries, he told his audience that his sPccch B: :n the Piedmont League; jJale Myers, outfielder, Pennsyl- State in 1941. and (Deck' Woldt. inficldcr. Northern State Leacuer 5Llvca wouia DC si F-.-j Cl-r'-e W-- i to onp famiiy jn M'VCIS. both were fl nnrci at Will Rogers Army the war. I.crdcy Crash V He referred to the sumptuous banquet which he had just en- loyed, and said that what he had been served would be sufficient Greece for three the Ada News Want Ads. WEATHERi Victim SANTA UOSA. N. M., Feb. for wage increases. This report on the wage price controversy came from a responsible but unquot- able official, as the White House gave out a denial that Reconver- sion Director John W. Snyder is Federal Prison Industries. Inc.! United States Spruce Production Corporation. Institute of Inter- American Affairs. Institute of Inter American Transportation. internal i Intc'r American Educational toundatinn, Inc., Inter-American Navigational Corporation, Pren- cinradio. Inc., Cargoes, Inc Ex- port Import Bank of Washing- ton. to be replaced in his high post 1 Petroleum Reserves Corpora- A White House spokesman also tlon' Rubber Development Cor- reported good progress Wxis be- U. S. Commercial com- ing made toward ending the ''0- "an.v- Smaller War Plants Cor- ilay strike of CIO United i Federal Public Housing Steelworkers. Authority. Defense Homes Cor- -'--I r'uun.jtii.i.t Girc. 24, Leedey. I that the wage-price policy tangle Oiila., was killed in thc collision j would result in Bowles taking of his automobile and a gasoline Snydcr's job, with federal cnm- The statement on Snyder was Federal Savings and in answer to published reports Loan Insurance Corporation. Home Owners' Loan Corporation Unitid States Housing Corpora- 
                            

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