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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 7, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             If this new show.fhc-bosom fad becomes it'll follow the of the of H.M. porti.ipoting will b. the one, l.o.l qualified to delight oherrer, Inrrr.iMiie i Imidmrss, warmer south anil extreme cast tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd li.'.I ADA. OKLAHOMA. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1946 Americans Called To Share Food World Faces Food Crisis, U. S. Moves to Avert Mass Starvation Abroad FIVE CENTS THE COPE Yamashita to Die Secretly On Gallows in City Men Destroyed WASHINGTON. rail Kcl... 7. s.iid ho 10 or a return to meat pco- rre- r.ce !o J.'i million to dentil. nt told liir. news t :.e thought it ;irv to ration If. be 0011 In t'i oad f ntn ntinued. he ought tu do Will Be Hanged Like Common Criminal, Says MacArthur in Upholding Death Sentence Imposed by Military Commission Corbin Angus Tops Prices At Houston By MURLIN SPENCER TOKYO, Fob. Gen. Tomoyuki Yamashita, his last hope for clemency denied by General MacArthur, must die secretly like a common criminal on the gallows in ranch 15 A city his trapped soldiers raped, pillaged and ithc "iglicst priced animal soid'ln burned. Heifer Sells for Af- ter Being Judged Grand Champion Angus Female Truman About Ready With His New Formula on Wages, -.pi of lm im; th'- tint to blame te iluatiun. It he added. in rncmy coun- Au.-tral v.ith rcl alia and other surpluses are lie said. confident that the cooperate ir.r, le-.-. Allies First Tr. int. he said in re.spon- f a question. will the people (Continued en P.-ige 10. Column 1) Kramer's Story Is Differing Now To Thai of Safford flv IIAVIS WASHINGTON. A. D. an s: the told Pearl s today that my otcler for IT.< n amia eon- Cieding Ja- 1 a -tcini.-hcd" pt. 1.. F. Saf- i.-t u eel; that in Admiral liar- ri.H-f naval oper- i-d v i- r ball y department a r tin- ,-ittack. ific-d lie relayed the lit- aid naval lu-li menior- C l.i YA.MASIIITA J. M. English Again Flies (all From Ranch to Texas J. M i.-; missing one M-foril from hi- ranch Miiith of today because for thi- tecond time in two years be has down calv from Hen-ford Heaven to be used in a "calf scramble" at Houston, Texas. Last year, Mr. English watch- ed the cattle scramble and when a boy who had fought hard for a calf did not get one he brought the boy to Ada and flew him and his calf to Scguin, Texas. That calf that he gave the boy just a year ago was sold at auc- tion Wednesday for 2-t cents pel- pound, which pleased Mr. Eng- lish. Mr. English arrived in Ada Wednesday alUrnoon. went to his ranch, got a choice calf, brought it to Ada and left early Thurs- j dav morning by plane. I "This may develop into an an- nual Mr. Knglish told a local man who helped him get 'away 'Ibursday morning FlyeTWasiTf In Distress; (all Air Port, Not Firemen Hill llniadrii-k. local flyer, ar- in Aria a little later than lie expect: d Wednesday as it was after dark when he first flew into Ada from San Antonio, Tex. A .short time after flying over town, he landed at the Chauncey Airport north of Ada. I-'ne Chief Kd Haley was pro- voked but not Mirprised with the shown by Ada citizens :.i 'p hands of per- when several persons call- e it in a "wins- ed the fin- station telling the l v.'tu-n Hawaii. :.nd Kra co t at tin ilrci lom.-d in a Admir immt-l. Pacific the Jap- that a flyer was in dis- time. c-ampaigii .n-.i-l or anybody Harbor blame, no-.-.' ;.n ''apparent he saw mi Dec. a ''false alarm." r eight" fali.e I'.e in the- Jap- mile liad been le- ii fit navy file .JD- the committee has r.ed contains only a c.-f paper bearing the e.ilirell'-d." never me.-sage. any me.-.-.ages v-'l lie in e rc- u e r.i hnd two identi- df winch dupli- firemen tress. Some of them could not con- tact the fire department through the regular telephone service so thev turned in a fire alarm to report that they thought a fly- er was in distress and needed heln. Fire Chief Haley said that a man is being paid to stay at the airport and handle such situa- tions as the one Wedmsday ni'.'ht. The caretaker should be called and not the fin- department. The chief said that no flyer had i-ra-hed near Ada because landing facilitirs were not made available. He added that he saw the plane when it first arrived in Ada and after liroadriel: blinked hi., lights a few tunes he went di- u-ctlv to the aii-port. All of the lights that would burn at the airport wen- turned on and Bioadrick made his land- ing safdy. Among the lights turned on was the large beacon that guided the flyer to the land- ing field. Phillips Pefroleum To 40-Hour Week AF'.TI.KSVII.I.K. Feb. 7. iWEATHERi l.-.r.o.-i.a _ Ir.rrcasing cloud- .-outh and extreme tonight: Fririny mostly y c'i'drr. much colder r.or'r. in afternoon, colder night. Homma Appealing For Civil Trial WASHINGTON. Feb. Lt. Gen. Masharu Homma, Jap- anese war leader charged with condoning the B a t a a n Death .March, today the supreme court to halt trial before an American military commission in Manila. Hnmma also asked the high tri- biinal. by airmail, that be be tak- en nut of tin- of the mili- taiy and lliat the supreme court u-view a refusal by the Philip, pine upu-iiK- court to grant him a writ nf habeas corpus. The general'.-, petitions were placed in the i -ail in Manila late in January, while the supreme court was considering similar pe- tition.-; filed by Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita, who is un- der death sentence as a war criminal. I The high tribunal last Monday j rejected all of Yan.asbita's con- I tc-ntions. petitions were placed before the justices immediately after their arrival today, but the court is expected to "announce later whether it will hear argu- ment on them or reject them. Greater icturns for amount in- i News Classified Ads. MacArthur, as final reviewing authority, today upheld the death sentence imposed on Yam- ashita by a military commission in Manila, and ordered that his one-time adversary meet his doom "stripped of uniform, dec- orations and other appurten- ances signifying membership in the military profession." l.t. Gen. Wilhelm D. Slyer, acting on MaeAl thur's orders, will carry out the execution se- cretly and then announce it. Newspapermen and photograph- ers will be barred. Witnesses To Remain Silent Styer, commander of army forces in the western Pacific with headquarters in Manila, said army-selected witnesses to the- execution would not be per- mitted to talk for publication. Yamashita. charged with con- doning atrocities by troops unde his command in the Philippines is the first top-ranking Japanesi ifficer whose conviction ha been reviewed by the suprcmi Allied commander. Fate of the calm, shaven-head ed Japanese general was left in Mat-Arthur's hands after the Philippines supreme court re- 'used to transfer the case fron nilitary to civil jurisdiction, ant he U. S. supreme court las Monday upheld the death sen- tence. Denounces Him MacArthur, in final review of ;he case against the foe who gnominiously failed to prevent lis triumphant return to thc 'hilippincs, delivered this scath- ng -denunciation of Yamashita: "It is not easy for me to piss udgmcnt upon a defeated ad- versary in a major campaign, lave reviewed the proceedings n vain search for some mitigal- ng circumstances on his behalf, can find none. "Rarely has so cruel and wan- on a record been spread to the public gaze. "This officer x x x has failed us duty to his troops, to his ountry. to his enemy and to nankind. He has failed utterly us soldier's faith. The transgres- IIIII.H xxx are n stain upon eiv- lization and constitute a nu-m- ry of shame and dishonor that an never be forgotten." No Legal Issues Involved In commenting on the legal r bad for all the American peo- ple." He said he believed thc closed .hop is "both un-American and unchristian." He added ho believed it can be worked out in thc next few days. Asked by a reporter if it is a "Big Steel formula" Mr. Truman said he had not heard of that. The president said the whole Question is one of production. All the people are aware, he added, of the need for production. "If we get mass production now, he said, the situation will adjust itself. There will be no reason for a wage-price formula then, he stated. His Original Goal He said this (Mass) produc- tion aim was what the adminis- tration had laid down from the start. Since the war ended, he said. the administration has called for i all-out production, to meet the I demand that had been piling up. He added the admimstralion's first wage-price formula (of last fall) would have worked if we had got the production we hoped we were going to get. Mr. Truman will confer at p.m. (cst) today with Philip Mur- ray, president of the CIO and the Stcelworkers union. Vacation Plans Unchanged The unsettled labor situation will not prevent his departure Monday for a ten-day vacation in Florida and nearby waters, the president asserted. 'He said he can still do business from tele- phone from his yacht, the Wil- liamsburg. He made this assertion when asked if he still planned to go to Florida if the steel and elec- tric strikes were not settled in advance of his scheduled depart- ure. Top men of both the CIO and AFL said today they must see the government's new price- wage declaration before they can commit their striking "unionists to accept it. Murray. Green Not Consulted As announcement of the re- laxed hold-thc-linc policy ran into still further delay. CIO President Philip Murray and AH, Chief William Green told a reporter in separate interviews they had not been consulted by the administration. Hence, they added, they can make no pledge's for their members. Murray nt the same time de- clined any comment on reports that he has been meeting pri- vately with slecl executives in nn effort to arrive at some basis for settling the strike of CIO Steelworkcrs which began January 21. One person who has kept in close touch with the walkout said there had been meetings this week. Although officials close to the administration said no basic dis- agreements remained over the new wage-price degree. OPA Chief Chester Bowles told news- men yesterday it might not be ready before the end of thc week. House Passes Strike Bill Okays Case Measure To Curb, Seek Settlement! Of Labor Strife Rcad the Ada News Want Ads. WASHINGTON, Feb. Dwight D. Eisenhower planning to leave soon on his first inspection lour of principa army installations in the United Stales since becoming war de partment chief of staff in No- vember. Officials said today the itin- erary was still being arranged Aside from recent trips to Can- ada ind Boston, Gen. Eisenhower has been kept to his desk by cur- rent urgent problems of demob- ilization and the army's future Only 6 per cent of the miles of primary rural highways in the United Stales have more than two traffic lanes. Dcfcot Stonewall 35-33 In Basketball Tournament; Four Games Tonight Allen defeated Stonewall 3S-33 m an East CL-ntral cage tourna- i ment Class H thriller Thursday afternoon, the .score being tied four or five limes in the last two minutes. UNO Council Past Crisis Over Greece, Tackles Indonesia Now By JACK SMITH LONDON. Feb. 7. The United Nations sccuritv council, its first crisis passed "with the solution of the Itussian Uritish dispute over Greece, moved on today to Consideration of the So- viet Ukraine charge that British Other Results In Class C: Fitzhugh 24. Horace Mann 21. Mill Creek Francis .15. Sasakwn 24. Vamoosa IB. Latta 27. Lula 7. Cromwell 40. Roff 14. Games Thursday Night: At Fitzluigh vs. Mill Creek: Wapanucka vs. Sasakwa. At vs. Crom- well; Latla vs. McLish. trnvclcd an estimated passenger miles during their war career. might be er diplomatic nut was Russia's alle- gation that the British were jeo- pardizing world security by maintaining forces in Greece. The 11-nation council was call- CST) and the first item on the agenda was the L'kranian com- plaint, which followed closely the wording of thc Soviet Union's complaint on the Greek siluation. In the background of the In- donesian controversy, however, was thc Soviet Union's policy calling- for the independence o'f colonial peoples. Opponents of British action in Java have being used to keep the Indonesi- ans under Dutch domination. Thc British, on Ihe other hand, have insisted that their forces were in Indonesia on the orders of Ihe allied combined chiefs of staff and that their only purpose was to preserve order while Jap- anese troops were removed and allied internees and prisoners of war were rescued. Dutch Back British The British case had the back- ing of the Netherlands govern- ment. The unrecognized Indon- esian government also has de- clared that British troops should remain in Java unlil all Japan- ese troops arc disarmed and re- moved. Despite the difficulties of the Indonesian case, the council fac- ed it with one distinct advantage, and that was the experience they had gained in settling the Greek dispute without splitting the unity of the big powers. The Russians yielded on every major charge against Britain as the council resolved the Greek i u iiiL- uieeK I charged that British forces were i crisis last night. Andrei Vishm- sky. Soviet vice commissar of foreign affairs, announced he would not insist on a council statement saying that British forces should be withdrawn from Greece immediately or that they were endangering world peace, as he had originally demanded. Britain Also Gives Ground British Foreign Seerctarv Er- nest Bcvin gave ground, too, in not pressing for formal council action to exonerate Britain of Ihe charge. In earlier debale he had demanded a flat "vet or no" vcr- dicl. Under_ a compromise worked ward R. Stettinius, Jr., in secret negotialions, the case was closed by a simple statement by Chair- man N. J. O. Makin of Australia. The statement merely said that the council. took nole of Ihe charge and denial, and of declar- ations made by other members of the council and Greece terming the charge unfounded. "The majority of the members (Continued on Page 10, Column I) Bv CI.AIR JOHNSON WASHINGTON, Feb. The house todav passed 257 to 15.r> the hotly-dispulrd case bill to curb and rock settlements of lalvir strife. Final action came on n roll call vole, sending Ihe far reaching strike control legislation to the senate. There, its foes predict it will meet sledding. Just before the conclusive bal- lot, members shouted down a mo- tion by Rep. Baldwin (R-NY) to send the bill back to the labor committee for further study. The measure, by Rep. Case won tentative approval late yesterday by a 197 to 115 standing count. But the clinching vote was de- layed until today when Rep. Hoffman (R-Mich) insisted that the lengthy, much-amended bill be read to thc house in its entire- ty- Authority To Mediation Board The Case proposal, as it now stands, would: 1. Create n federal mediation board with authority to step into major labor disputes and forbid strikes or. lockouts for 3D while it sought to solve them. 2. Permit wide use of court in- junctions in enforcing the cooling off period, preventing violence or insuring movement of perishable goods. .1. Provide for civil suits against either labor or management for breaking contracts. Outlaws Plrkrtiiiif Violence 4. Outlaw violence in picketing by either side. (Violators would be subject to court injunctions and to loss of their bargaining 5. Ban boycotts used to force disputants to come to terms. Sponsors said this would prevent many jurisdiction.il controver- sies. (Violators would face loss of their bargaining powers.) 6. Deny employe status to un- ions of supervisory workers, un- less they do manual productive labor. Opponents Fight Vainly Case's backers A powerful coalition of republicans and southern clear- ly in control of the Voting on more than a .'core of suggested modifications and substitutes. Opponents M a i n 1 v close friends of organized labor fought the plan bitterly. They declared it would strip of their rights and promote in- dustrial discoid. But when thc test votes came, about all they accomplished was slight modification of thc provi- sions applying to court injunc- tions. WOODWARD. Feb. Jim Selman, president, said 100 members of the northwest Ok- lahoma Cattlemen's association would go to Oklahoma City Feb. 28 "to let the outside world know what the organization is about." The cattlemen will be enter- tained by the chamber of com- merce in the capitol city. A din- ner in their honor will be attend- ed by Oklahoma City civic lead- ers and newspaper and radio men The association was formed here last June and grew to membership of 1.000 from Cim- arron. Texas. Beaver, Ellis. Har- per. Woods. Dewey and Wood- ward counties. TH1 PESSIMIST Mr n Never without git hurt. might Th' reason a lot towns never progress is because too many 're willin' V let too few run th' show.   

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