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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 6, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             If some of the motenojs shortages continue much longer, there will have to be some restrictions on the use of elbows and feet in order to reduce the growing percentage of casualties.... Fair tonight and Thiusilay; little chance in tonight; warmer Thursday THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Homma Says Gave Bales' Bull Order for Baraan Grand Champ March of Prisoners Says Is Morally Responsible for Anything That Happened Under His Command, But Avers Didn't Cheek Up on PW's Condition, Why Deaths at Camp Were Excessive Blue Boy Repeats as Grand Champion Bull at Houston Fat Stock Show Six nniniiils from the Cliarle. r. Bates and Sons Angus rnncl south of Ada wore entered in tin? Houston, Tex.. Stock show reb. 1-10, and won three first prizes in addition to a grant champion award. For the first time in the his- tory of the Houston show, a bull was selected grand champion two years in succession. The bull "I morally responsible for anything that happened thc m By PAUL MASON MANILA. Feb. Gen. Mashaharu Homma -.sttcd unck-r cross examination at his war crimes trial to- day that l-.e issued the order for the Bataan march of American prisoners of war and added: mo under my command. We May Eat Less Cake So That Millions in Europe Can Have More Bread To Keep from Starving Hy OKVIh A. MAKTIN WASHINGTON. Feb.. ..n_ A urcs-dential .-IPI.' al to Ami-ri- ram In ;i little cuke so millions in Knrnpr- would c .-rioiiL'h to kc i-p them tarring was pi cdictecl in r-.nirnt Bates and named Blue Boy of Bates When the bull was shown in he was 13 months old and this year as a two vcar old wnn Homma mode the admission in grand .champion honors again Seventeen thousand Aii.ericans and Filipinos died on that march. Check On (.million you inquire tiiy physical tlie prisoners of g IT th until n rdav v.ar ext lit his cab- v.'eighe-i the country to ravi lied eonlin- harvest. came fiom lh" that t vVd tn or Ame an abinet mc-n c :ief executive -ue a statement ic-.ms to u-c less products. T.-.n country lias insufficient r-pplics of the cram to meet both -r.rcslricted domestic demands and to hungry Pointing mi the wheat Mtua-. war, n llriti.-h govc-rnnn-nt i t" restorr that mtila to its r. At tin.1 wen- told that i li-.-s bacon, Lccaur.c of the replving to a series of questions by Lt. Col. Frank Meek. .Cald- wc-Il, Itla., L-hitf of the piosecu- tion staff. "You knew you lind 70000 pris- oners of war at the fr.ll of Ba- ta-mV" Meeks asked. leplied Honu-.i.i. 'You knew you issued an order for them to march from Balanga to .San Fernandir1" Didn't conditions of "I dill not." ''Old you consider toe condi- tions at (Camp) O'Doi.nell your as coinmandcr-iri- After a pause. Honu.ia replied' "1 am morally responsible for anything that occurred under my command." Homma testified that alllmugh In- considered treatment of pris- oners of war "an impm tant mat- in he was not kept as to their treatment except per- chance as "the chief of j-taff had Mr. Bates phoned his son Tues- day night and was informed that a female won first place in her division, the bull won first in Ins division before being judged grand champion and Mr. Bates failed to get the information I about the third animal that placed first. Charles Bales, jr.. ranch man- ager and manager of ail breed- ing stock, is showing thc Angus at Houston. Mr. Bales said that his ani- mals will be returned to' the ranch Monday and will be kept there until going to Fort Worth lex. for a show there in March. Curltnn Cot-bin, president of the Angus Association of Amer- ica, took five animals from his ranch south of Ada to the Hous- ton show. ADA, OKLAHOMA. WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY B, Air-Minded Horse Refuses Carrot FIVE CENTS THE COPK way Freight plane which Los thc first trans-continental hop to try and feed one of up the cargo for a National Sky- carrying horses, from New York to tore Japs To Russia and Britain Be Arrested Ponder Compromise Agreement Reported Near on Wage-Price Policy Alteration Announcement Expected Soon But Lost-Minute Differ- ences May Delay It; New Government Policy Aimed At Ending Steel and Most Other Major Labor Disputes 1 By WILLIAM NEEDHAX WASHINGTON, Feb. administra- tion advisors strove today to iron out last-minute differences over details of a new government wage-price policy aimed at ending the steel well as most other major labor disputes. bic.vl p.iinr of t.'.r tin-.e Bi lions oiiltry and eggs of fe.-ci. And at Bu-no? rr.'.ir.e cab; on Pago 2 Column 5) Be Sure AlTYour Children 6 lo 21 Are Enumerated c Airec rr.e-t tn untrv'.- the Ar- clrafl an popula- Tlie school census takers for District lit, which includes Ada are making last minute efforts to bring enumeration figures tip to last year's level, says Supt hex O. Morrison. :rade circles here looked to to take some lowaril limiting r-f fli.or and bakery to -nurage feed- ;g c.f-.her.t to h-. i-stock. Thirteen Judges Elected to Court On First Ballot don, who have been busy for some- weeks taking the annual scholastic- census, hav_- reported to Morrison that de-spite the c-reiwelcrl residence conditions here- the- figure's thus far are a little below last vcar's total of 3 "V i 01 .j, th.in n month U. S. and Russia In Agreement on Aid To Korean Set-Up By MORRIE LANDSBERG SEOUL. FcB., 0. Unl- t'd States and Russia today nn- nounced agreement on the frame- work for joint efforts to help politically inexperienced Korea establish a provisional govern- ment. However, the joint conference ended three weeks of discussion without nny official disclosure of detailed plans for Riving the country its political freedom. It was called to carry out terms of the .Moscow conference setting up a five-year-allied trusteeship for this country, formerly dominated by Japan. A joint comminauo said repre- sentatives of the Soviet and American command-! in Kortn agreed to set up a 10-mcmbcr commission which will start work Including Shimomura, In Charge of 13th Army When Doolittle Fliers Slain Bv UUSSKI.I, BRINES TOKYO. Feb. 0. _ _ Gen. >adashi Shimomura, Japan's Bcvin, Vishiniky Submit to Their Governments Proposal That Would Ease UNO Council Around Greece Deadlock By JOHN M. IIIOIITOWKR LONDON. Feb. Secretary Frnost nan us in iimmomura. Japan's t c .1 LUU v ncsi post-surrender war minister, to- went before thc British cabinet today for a decision on crime, Allied' head- pect. Authoritative................ quarters sources asserted that he had signed final orders for the three Doolittle execution of fliers in 19-IL'. General Mai-Arthur alsn deadlock over extricate the United Nations security council from a first rate? crisis. The British cabinet meeting broke up at a. m., CST) and the ministers left No. 10 structed "go'vernl Stfeot. disclosing what had taken place. Englisted Men Given Break Legislation Would Give Their Families Same Chance as Officers To Go Abroad WASHINGTON. Feb. removim: any   to 21 arc reminded to enumerate them whether fi vi- and nn-in- assis- anv mrenU nrltion w'iu have .in> _Paiinlslbrrs. plus advisers tants. Seoul was desicnated the per- manent scat of the- 'commission IV. Vle specified' lint it will visit Hcrjo and will travel to other parts of Korea. Seoul, the capital is in American occupied southern Korea; Heijo is the seat of Russian adminis- tration of northern Korea. The communique did not state outside or not' i r children are at present in or blackout bo- is district. Grctn Ha in t C.c-cted. John E. Head of Ottawa, a ICR- r! .-idv.x-.- the Canadian cle- of external a.'iuirs, was judge chosen. Tf.'-.-e c- 70 nomm.it'ons for the c-o.ti t which Drug Store Broken Into During Night Money Untouched, Foun- foin Pens, Pilh and Nar- cotics Taken Tr-.v v :n the c., t-y A ji-cr. r.nti a of an- held :.nd was ballot of ".e council was en de-red to o '.-th Ie-l-eiVi-1 e- Votes v.-hilc. Read eight in T'.': -7 of a membe-r of is nine B-.it in the that Five l.ave ix-vc-ar te-rms r.'i l.'.e- five three- I.'ie two fiLed. ti-.e secretary-general d.Ticie by lot itidces tin- and thrce- court of :is tlie nermattent justice es- :e in HI21. i C.urns Hc-xall drug store. 105 r-asl Alain, was Mon- day night and city police have our pen-cms in jail for investiga- i licit purposes in connection with the- break in. Five Parker 51 fountain pens a number of various tvpe; and some narcotics were taken Horn the store when it was en- tered r dosing hours. Ihe safe was not bothered and money that was left in a register untouchcj. accord- ing to members of the police force who made n thorough investiga- tion of the robbery Police report that the front door was pushed in until a part of the lock broke, giving t Ill- person or persons entrance into he building. The burglars left through a rear exit. "The four persons who arc in jail are being questioned in con- nection with the break in." Dud Lester, chief of police, said Wed- nesday morning. tween the two occupation zones would be lifted. Americans arc not permitted north of thc 38th parallel, the zone boundary. The announcement safd the commission will consult with political parties and social organizations of both south and north Korea." It was sign- ed by Maj. Gen. A. V. Arnold and Col. Gen. T. F. Shtikov. chiefs of thc American and Soviet delegations. Favoring Press Freedom Try Wants UNO to Sponsor International Meeting On Full Press Freedom ment to round up and deliver to Stigamo prison 18 other militar- ists suspected of crimes against prisoners of war. They presum- ably will be tried by American military commissions. Shimomura became command- i nr of Japan's 13th army in China Oct 13. "the three LJoolittle airmen were condemn- ed but before they were killed Executed while their hands were bound to crude crosses in a Chinese cemetery on Oct lr> IH-12. were 2nd Lt. William Grov- er Farrow. 23, Darlington. N. J 2nd Lt. Dean Edward Hallmark Dallas; and Sgt. Harold A. Lebo, Kas. Their bodies were cremated and the ashes secreted m a civilian Chinese mortuary under false names. Atrocities were continuous miring the war in areas control- led by thc Japanese 13th armv, headquarters officers asserted. T. 4 ns Prcvious commander. L.I. Gen. Shigcru Sawada. was extradited to China last week- end for trial, together with a Captain Waco, member of Sa- waclas court martial which con- victed the Doolittle fliers. Shimomura told thc Associa- ted Press in an exclusive inter- view shortly before his arrest was ordered that responsibility lor the airmen's execution rest- ed with high Tokyo and China officers, although their deaths followed his assumption of com- mand. "I had very little interest in the case because it already had been decided in thc past." he said. He declared thc Sawada's court merely made recommenda- tions, and that death orders were issued by Tokyo Either wartime Premier Hidc- ki Tojo or Field Marshal Gen since has com- milled the or- ders, Shimomura added Similar considerations were be- lieved by United Nations leaders to be underway in Moscow. The council looked hopefully to Gen- eralissimo Stalin and Pi-imp Min- ister Attlee to approve the pro- posed compromise. Both Bcvin and Andrei Vishin- ski, Soviet vice commissar of foreign affairs, told a secret em- ergency meeting of the five ma- jor power members of the- secur- ity council last night that they would have to ask their govern- ments n-.-w instructions. Tension security whole There wa.s widespread specula turn that the British cabinet, in view of Bevin's strung demand for complete exoneration Rus- charges that British troops in C. r c e c e were endangering i peace.' might find unacceptable I the compromise proposal made by Norman J. O. Makin of Aus- tralia. chairman of the i council. j Answers from both lho> British i and Russian govei nnu-nls were expected be-fore the- council meets j at 9 p.m. Ci p.m.. Central Stand- ard Time) tonight for its fourth attempt to settle the Greek ques- tion. Would Give It Kun-Around In an effort to break the dead- lock between Russia's insistence that British troops in Greece menace world peace and Britain's demand for outright rejection of that charge, thc compromise pro- posal simply would dismiss the case by having the council pass on to other business. However. Makin would maki a .statement taking of Rus sia's arguments. Britain's argu All Persons Taken From Wreckage Oi Liner, None Lost KKTCHIKAN. Alaska. Feb. fi. i.-1'l of all of tlie -f.Ki persons from the wnvked liner i ukcm. which broke in two in a vicious gale on the rocks of Jolm- Bay, was reported early to- day by Ihe Ketchigan Chronicle. About 100 were landed on the nearby beach by breeches buoy thc Chronicle reported, and tlie rest arc in Sewarcl or aboard the vessels whicit overcame the nortbland gale in iedious but successful rescue operations. The report said the rescue snips were presumably taking all of the sur- vivors to Seward. wnere 50 had previously been landed. Breeches buoys will be rigged. thc coast guard said, U> transfer the the of the applications uhject to availability p. m. Downing j at least one milting. Approval would he s of-adequate housing within "a reasonable radius" of .he applic- ant's post on duty. Johnson told a reporter he in- troduced the legislation as the result of a discussion between some members of the house ap- propriations committee and Gen- eral Dwight Eisenhower and oth- er high army officials. The Oklahoman said Eisen- hower believed there wa.s suf- ficient transportation available and that the main question would be that of housing. Voskuil Says U. 5. Can't Hold Up To Pre-War Oil Oulpuf One high official, not quotable by name, said that a White House announcement of the formula I might come today. However, dn- other reported that disaqree- i ments had developed late ycster- I tlav which could force further j delay. 1 Both agreed, however, that the government's petition on steel price increases key .o settling I the walkout of TaO.OOn CIO steel be slated either simultaneous with announce- ment of the wage-price policy re- vision, or immediately after- wards. Bowles. Snyclcr At Odds What disagreements had de- veloped remained uncN-.'ir. 1 pen tedly. they OI'A Ad- ministrator Chester Bowles and Recovery Director John. Snydcr. who had been at odds on" the price question fm- sor.ic t.u-.e. It was however, that Pre.sidcnl Truman's advisers were working under neavv pres- sure- to bring mil the- ,iolicy state- ment as quickly as possible. On- less the he-armg is poslpon- enl. Bowles is scheduled to testify on wage-price policy before a congressional comiriUce tomor- row. Murray Summons Conference Lending weight to belief that a major break is due in the (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Says Germans Stole 736 Freight Train Loads of Art NUERNBERG. Germanv. Feb Germans stole 735 freight train loads of art in western Europe-, including paint- ings, rare books, sculpture and lewelry. tin- French prosecutor i told the international military i tribunal today. Furthering the war crimes 'trial against 22 ranking Nans, the trench charged that thc Ger- mans contended that such seiz- ures should be considered mere- ly an indemnity for "sacrifices in the struggle tain a flow m-c-war oil supply, Walter H. Voskuil. University of Illinois ._ I Liglity-ftve year old Eci- 'A-.yd Nix. who I'. S. mat-.-lial l.'-.pcd round t band c. outlaw.- in tvrntorv is u-i-.o played .in ..cca.iiona! :n rcarbv Hollywood rrodiiceci a radio pro- crarr.. "The Kightii.q Colonel." -IT West Takes Gun TofirT Seriously i.i i'WEATHER! _ Fair fonicht and i little in tem- r-erature tonight: Ic-mper- Par.liantile t-> HO south- wa.-rr.tr Thursday Feb. The west still takes its gun totin' i ignis seriously. .Senator Taylor, a democrat from Idaho raid so in out against n bill by an ..-isteriier Senator Hawks The bill Itiiie- every gun owner his shoolin' ;iejns. I proposal is an infringe- l i nient of the remMilutiejiial rights "f all said favlor in a statement. "The bill would only restrict and make it more difficult for sportsmen, hunters and other law-abiding citizens." j -Senator H; J i would 1 eqi j tn l.'gister I __ LONDON. Feb i ippme Delegate Pedro Lopez I Planned to propose to the United Nations today that the organiza- tion sponsor an international meeting on freedom of the press at the general assembly's second session, scheduled to be held in the United States later this year. He said he would ask thc as- sembly s general com- mittee to place his resolution on the agenda for the next meet of the assembly after the London session is concluded. That would be the second half of the first session. The resolution, if eventually approved by the assembly would put the UNO on record as favoring the following prin- ciples in connection with the in- ternational gatherinfi and distri- bution of news: All sources of news, parti- cularly official sources, shall be lion" 0" without discrimina- i V1" transmission facilities equally available to all he a minimum of official regulation of the flow of news itself." Lopez now proposes that the conference be held at the per- manent site of the UNO at the assembly's second session, that arrangements be made for it by the assembly and that all mem- ber states be represented by an adequate number of newspaper officials. i Three Cities Have Surplus of Jobs WASHINGTON, Feb. fi.-M'i The labor department todav list- ed Washington, D. C., Peoria, III and Richmond, Va., as the onlv important cities in the country reporting more jobs than job- seekers. Kobert C. Goodwin, director of the U. S. employment r.ervice, de- clared a sharp rise in January unemployment reports was caus- ed by seasonal trends, a recon- version slow-down and "the re- cent heavy influx of icturning veterans. A USES survey as nf Feb. 1 showed a jump from IS to 31 in the number of labor market areas reporting "severe" unem- ployment. A labor surplus was reported from U9 arsas. USES said the total population in the "severe" and "surplus" r e a s was more :han half of the (iO.OOO.OOO popu- ation included in all of the- Kf" labor-market areas from which ts were received. None of the reports include corkers directly involved in c-tir- ent strikes, Goodwin explained but they did cover unemplov- ment Irends in areas where work stoppages were indirectly affect- ing industry. women and children in- power boat Monday night, re-porte-d ter- sely lei coast guard headquarters at Keidiak that the number of res- ments and the- expres.-ed I CUI'" "i-ached 2111. other members of the council again II: Russia is the only council mi'.ssagcd lhal tiie'i survivors on the beach at scene of the wrccK to rescue Vessels. As the wind died and the sea organ to calm, rescuers fought j mineral economist 'said toda with power boats, life rafts and Dr. Voskuil's statement' were buoys, and last, presented in the third of a spe nignt jJng. Gen. Harry series of business tlew over the scene and reported ]tributed by the survivors on the biacii were huddled around bemfiie-s. Apparently no lives had been lost. The? coast guard cutler On- ondaga, which tool- oif the first Charles Gertoffer. the prose- cutor. said Germany established an art looting staff under Alfred Rosenberg, w h i c h frequently concentrated its entire allention o-i yj50" Collecting for He reserves in the United'stT.u's either arc not adequate in I haul or. if adequate, can not be ciis- enough to main- equal to the average URBANA. 111.. Feb.. studies dis- j the University's bur- economic and business rescue was no from the- scene expressed confi- dence that all aboard voulcl be saved. t 'IlllL II IIU'lll- t n-.............. 
                            

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