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Ada Evening News: Wednesday, February 6, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - February 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                                 lf tow of Hit materiolt ihorfojt «.»«„„ m«k I.,,.,,  wl „  h . y . „  sowrwtMchon, on the use of elbows and feet in order to reduce the  growing percentoge of cosuolties... .  Fair tonight and Thursday; little change in temperature tonight: warmer Thursday  42nd Year—No. 250  Horn ma Says Gave  Order for Bataan  March of Prisoners  Soy, I, Morally Responsible Anything That Happened -     ma " J '  But  Avers Didn't Check Up on  PW s Condition, Why Deaths at Camp Were Excessive  By PAUL MASON  admSf ^  Feb -  6 -< AP >- Lt - Gen. Mashaharu Homma ,    under cross examination at his war crimes trial to-  oay that he issued the order for the Bataan march of 70,000 American prisoners of war and added*  un J ™cZ”l™ POnSiblef ° r anytHing that ha ^ ned   We May Eat Less Cake  So That Millions in Europe Con Hove More Bread To Keep front Starving  By OR VI I) A. MARTIN  WASHINGTON, Feb., 6. <.P>_  A presidential appeal to Americans to eat a little less cake so that millions in Europe would nave enough bread to keep them from starling was predicted in some government and trade quarters today.  President Truman and his cab-met explored Europe’s bread i news yesterday and weighed the I  Atli lf tv Af 4 UU    ___a- j X..  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  BUY MORE WAR BONDS  ADA, OKLAHOMA. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1946  Bates' Bull Air-Minded Horse Refuses Carrot  Grand Champ  FIVE CENTS THE COPY  i    thousand Americans  and Filipinos died on that march.  Homma made the admission in replying to a series of questions  by  n  Lt ; ' Co1 * Frank Meek, .Caid-   !  {ion’staff:’ ' ef  ° f  * he K0SeCU -“You knew you had 70 OOO prisoners of war at the fall of Bataan? Meeks asked.  “Yes,” replied Homma.  You knew you had issued an oi der for them to march „ from Ba I anga to San Fernando 7 ” “Yes.”   Check 0n  Condition  Did you inquire Hie physical  c ° nd| tions * be  Prisoners of  war.  “I did not.”  “Did you consider the conditions at (Camp) O’Donnell your  chief?"  y ’  aS cormnand er-in-  After a pause, Homma replied*  ability of this counVr’v^'tT tide I anvthto* IM?  res P<" over that uar-ravishcd cont*? “mmand.^ 4     “ nder   ent until next summer's harvest.! Homma testified that »ito„ »u  u .j N ° comment came from the he considered treatment of n??.  privately that°the a cMef l  cxrc'-utivc tor"'h^was'nan important mat-expected to issue a statement to their treatment 15  -x^of 6 * 1 aS  wheat* and     less  I S!^_ ce as  ’ the chief of 2StEd  This country has insufficient supplies of the grain to meet both unrestricted domestic demands and commitments to humrrv areas abroad.    -  Pointing up the wheat situation was a British government decision yesterday to restore that country s bread formula to its lowest point of the war. At the same time Britons were told that there would be less bacon, poultry and eggs because of the lack of feed.  I (Continued on Page 2 Column 5)  Be Sine All Your Children (lo ll Are Enumerated  _The school census takers for District 19, which includes Ada,  And at Buenos Aires the Ar. I    hist    minute    efforts  mine cabinet met to’draft an to iii? g ™9‘™ e , ratl< ? n flgure !?  U P  Blue Bey Repeats et Grand Champion Bull et Houston Fat Stock Skew  Six Bnimals from the Charles  iii.Sf    Angus    ranch  south of Ada were entered in  fLk i°VS ton ’ J ex -  Stock  show, Feb. 1-10, and won three first  prizes m addition to a grand champion award.  For the first time in the history of the Houston show, a bull was selected grand champion two years in succession. The bull that accomplished the fete is owned bv Mr. Bates and is wu  Blue Boy ot  Bates. i o r- h l n  * be bu B was shown in l94o, he was 13 months old and tnis year as a two year old won champion honors again. Mr. Bates phoned his son Tuesday night and was informed that a female vvon first place in her division, the bull won first in his division before being judged ? rand  champion and Mr. Bates ahint tK  ge *u• y 16  information  M first.  tlUrd animal that  Charles Bates, jr., ranch man-?.£? r  * an ? manager of ail breed-  a?* Holton 5 Sh ° Win *  the  A"*"*   B n te l  said tha t his, ani-u ** resumed to the ranch Monday and will be kept  TVv re f^ nt o  g u  m *l°  Fort W °rth, r 'JuL*  there in Mfl rch. th I Corbin, president of *  n ? us . Association of America, took five animals from his ranch south of Ada to the Hous ton show.  her Jjorses, Princess Pa*? a ca^ot.^Two horned'’five^og^mld  tak ° S ’  tim °  t0 try and fecd  enc of  Kisxasaraar* “*».  Agreement Reported Near on Wage-Price Policy Alteration  Announcement Expected Soon But Lost-Minute Differences May Delay It; New Government Policy Aimed At Ending Steel ond Most Other Major Labor Disputes  By WILLIAM NEEDHAM    ^  WASHINGTON, Feb. 6.—(AP) —Top-level administration advisors strove today to iron out last-minute differences oyer details of a new government wage-price policy aimed  at ending the steel strike—as well as most other major labor disputes.  One high official, not quotable  gentile cabinet met to draft an appeal to that country’s population to eat less meat so that more could be shipped abroad.  Trade circles here looked to the government to take some steps toward limiting domestic consumption of floor and bakery pioducts and to discourage feeding of wheat to livestock.  Thirteen Judges Elected to Court On Firs! Ballo!  Jim Ga mm ill and Renfro Hern-.don, wh.o have been busy for   taking the ann ual  scholastic census, have reported  r?ou!dS nSOn  * i h3t despite the  crow ded residence conditions  PS? i h f hgures thus far are a rntle below last year’s total of 3,-  Morrison asks that any parents who were missed by the census  .ni".dSL;f “*  , “ v '  -Sr® ai; si vs  six yeais old by September I of this year and who will not be 21 years old by that date Parents living in the Ada dis-  THiv I     ve     children    from    the  Th r. ages of 6 to 21 are reminded to  ie in- Pnilinorafo    ...l. _.1  U. S. and Russia In Agreement on Aid To Korean Set-Up  By MORRIE LANDSBERG   }p ? Fe 5”  6 '  CflPt ~The United States and Russia today an-  J!? rt  U S Ce , d a * raem ent on the frame-% k f S r  * oint  efforts to help   mexpe, : i ® nce d Korea establish a provisional government.  A«^feS^4u er ’ * be  conference ended three weeks of discussion  Hoi  an , y  °ff* c ial disclosure of detailed plans for giving the  ™ u . ntry  I* P° litica f freedom. It  thi n? 8    0 c ! rry out terms  of  the Moscow conference setting up  a five-year-allied trusteeship for  this country, formerly dominated  py Japan.  i® int co pihinque said representatives of the Soviet and  mSF 9 ?  cor T lman ds in Korea agreed to set up a 10-member  ^bich will start work   8  ? r    a mont b hence.  Each nation will have five mem-  tants  P S tfdvisers and  assis-  Seoul was designated the per-P a . ne ^  seft t of the commission, th-4 A ..fo^munique specified , J .* U i.u V “ ,t H *'j° ? n _4 will  More laps To Russia and Britain Be Arrested Ponder Compromise  ^ Vi "w i *!’! n ’ ky S,,bmi,  *•  Th * ir  OwarawaaH Proposal  W#bM Eom  UNO Council Around Greece Deadlock  Eng listed Men Given Break  Legislation Would Give Their Families Seme Chance os Officers To Ga Abrood  Including Shimomura, In Charge of 13th Army When Doolittle Fliers Slain  ^ Dy, RDsseia brines  TOKYO, Feb. 6. — (>p) Gen  Sadashi Shimomura. Japans post-surrender war minister, today was ordered arrested as an* international war crimes suspect Authoritative Allied headquarters sources asserted that he had signed final orders for the execution of three Doolittle fliers in 1942.  General MacArthur also instructed the Japanese government to round up and deliver to Sugamo prison 18 other militarists suspected of crimes against  Shiv”!? nR v5 T ar ’ J  T i hey  P res um-ably will be tried by American  military commissions.  Shimomura became commandos f? pa ?n S J 3th , army in China   •    —after the three  Doolittle airmen were condemn-ed but before they were killed.   Fxec  K  uted , while their hands were ut  bound to crude crosses in  ese ce meterv on Oct. 15 1942, were 2nd Lt. William Grov-  SLftFK 23* Darlington. N. J.; 2nd Lt. Dean Edward Hallmark Dallas; and Sgt. Harold A. Spatz, Lebo. Kas. Their bodies were ci emated and the ashes secreted   C l v i lian     mortuary  under false names Atrocities  LONDON, Feb. 6  By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER  (AP)—Foreign Secretary  WASHINGTON. Feb. (i — (,r>— Legislation removing any discrimination between enlisted mon and officers as to govcrnment-paid transportation of their families to overseas stations has been , introduced in both houses of | congress.  A hill by Senator Lucas (D-i IU) also W(»uld instruct the war and navy departments to make a survey of housing, food and medical supplies available in foreign occupied areas, j The house measure was introduced bv Rep. Jed Johnson (D-Ok.a) who stipulated that spe-Lrnest I Cific appropriations would be re-  fl111 rnrl in    ___.I    .    .  n •    '----*    *    ocvicidiy    Lrnesi     r ___ _______  evm  went  before the British cabinet today for a decision on  c J u  1  i r ed ‘ to finance" theTr^ a new proposal to break the British-Russian dead Wk     er     bill,    the    hus-  Gi-e.ce and .Kine.,.  UnlW     VXtS I'iS«„? K  irom a first rate crisis.    “    ; sei ? to  " is  overseas station at  public expense and he would  -------- ——    >.    iiiccmiv    ii    r    ll    lf    a    im    no    *i.i    c      i    hSV’P tr» nOrca in    »    ai  (7:15  The British cabinet meeting broke up at 2:15 p. m '  have ,  to a «ree7n wrTting that'he 5 a. rn., CST) and the YninisWc    in     •    I    would    remain ’    -  a. rn., CST) and the ministers left No IO Downing at°Wc/ e T ain in  t is thcater   it disclosing what had taken     ng     milting. ^  hlS health p ^  I Approval of the applications j would be subject to availability of adequate housing within “a j reasonable radius” of .he applic-ant s post on duty.  I Johnson told a reporter he in-: tioduced the legislation as the ‘result of a discussion between I some members of the house appropriations committee and Gen-  1  • era ID wight Eisenhower and oth-KETGHTKAM Wo*' * t- l  A      arm Y officials.  Asportation available and that the main question would be that of housing.  All Personi Taken From Wreckage Of Liner, None Lost  te^n 0 of D t°e’lf*u d ? 0 7oT'the'^'! ^nf.n  01  ? V 1 are  aminded to  ternational court of juctice were the childi^n 'J’ hether or  not  « “ or   council and general assembly.  Green Hackworth. a legal authority in the United States state department, was one of the 13 elected.  John E. Read of Ottawa, a legal adviser to the Canadian department of external affairs, was  Jud S e  chosen.  ♦uThere were 76 nominations for the 15 places on the court which will sit at Hague, the iudges    are  n°uaHv Pa 3 salary of S18 .°00    an-  The \ote. held simultaneously in the council and assembly, was by secret ballot.  A second ballot of the council *u l*—;—r'** and assembly was ordered to ?. break In -elec t the other two judges.    £ Ue v  Par J e r 51 fountain pens,  Hackworth received eight votes    ?    cumber of pills    of various types  Smhfv  COU u V 1  « nd 32 in the    as -    from     f  narcoti  u  cs     were    taken  sembly,while Read got eight in ii ^  store  when it was en-   C0 K clI , a !? d 27 in lhe  assSnbl"  ter ^ d aft /r closing hours.   41 l,    m    of    a    member    of     sa    was    no ^    bothered    and  the international court is nine ^ on I e     that    was    left    in    a  Drug Son Broken  Into During Night  Money Untouched, Fountain Fens, Fills end Narcotics Taken  105  were continuous  travel    u“” v     f na     wiiijaunng    the    war    in    areas    control-  Seonl fh® ®f i part ?  of  Korea. | Jfd by the Japanese 13th army T?™*.  tbe ca Pital is in American headquarters officers asserted’ is     sou tbern Korea; Heijo The 13th’s previous commander  uJSSL * ' °^  s n a dminis-  Lt * Gen. Shigeru Sawada? was tration of northern Knr»*    extradited to Pkmo  Street without disclosing what had taken place.  Similar considerations were be-’O-lieved by United Nations leaders * to be underway in Moscow. The council looked hopefully to Generalissimo Stalin and Prime Minister Attlee to approve the proposed compromise.  Both Be vin and Andrei Vishin-ski, Soviet vice commissar of foreign affairs, told a secret emergency meeting of the five major power members of the security council last night that they would have to ask their governments for new instructions.  Tension Pervades Meeting An air of tension pervaded the i whole United Nations meeting.  I here was widespread specula-! tion that the British cabinet, in view of Bevins strong demand tor complete exoneration qf Russia s charges that British troops in Greece ------  tration of northern Korea.  wSlL CO I5 munique did not  state J^ftherthe present blackout be-  ! he tw° occupation zones would be lifted. Americans are  2SJLRS II Si ted nor i h of the  38th  •ft *  zone  boundary.  The announcement said the commission will consult with democratic political parties and  of both  south u - Ko i ea - It was sign-^ H  b y Maj Gen. A. V. Arnold T-  F - Shtikov,  delegations*  Amer,c#n and Soviet   Filipino Favoring  Wonts UNO to Sponsor Internetionol Meeting On Full Frets Freedom  year terms.    J police report that the front  arm ful t^ e  remaining two seats  d ?°I,^ as  1  Pushed in until a part ?i j ^ e d. the secretarv-general!    lock    broke,    giving the  will decide by lot which judges P eFS( ? n  Persons entrance into , iil h . a Ai? le six -year and three-1 j^hudd^n^^e^burglars left  1-7'^  f uur persons' who are in Jail are being questioned in con-nee .on with the break in" Dud  nesday mornfng" 01 ^’  Said Wed '  Wesl Takes Gun Tolin' Seriously  W ASHINGTON, Feb. 0. (JP)_  i ichll V ^ St StiII i  Ukes lts gun totin ’ lights seriously.   c     ^ W€U>U   t  Senator Taylor, a democrat  Read tne Ada News Want Ads. L. lc l m  ^daho said so in speaking   ..... ^ against a bill bv an . sdnmo,.   ---- » Hawks (R XI.) The tai  would lequire every gun owner «*Ti? lster bis sh °atin’ iions.  would only restrict  SSI*     more     difficult for  sportsmen, hunters and other law-abiding citizens.”  year terms.  The new international court of t Suc f eeds  .the permanent u ^  m *«r natlona l justice established at the Hague in 1921.   /  mVER^DE, tfalif., Feb. «— ^—Eighty-five year old Ed-  *’ "i 10 as a U -  s * marshal helped round up the Dalton band I o. outlaws in Oklahoma territory I days, is dead.    j  Nix, %*ho played an «*ccasional I movie role in nearby Hollywood recently produced a radio program, 'The Fighting Colonel ”  800 them California broadcast.  {weather  A.___  Oklahoma ~ Fair tonight and Thursday; little change in temperature tonight: lowest temperatures Id Panhandle to 30 south-w est, warmer Thursday.  . london. Feb .6.—(jp) phii-  ? elegate Pe dro Lopez Planned to propose to the United Nations today that the organiza-  mpp#in S J >0nso / 5 n inter national meeting on freedom of the press  at the general assembly’s second  session, s c h ed uled  to be held in  u. Utes , A ter this  year-  He said he would ask the as- ge . neral , /steering) com-  ♦UL VI j  p  ? ce  solution on the agenda for the next meet of the assembly after the London session is concluded. That would second half of the first  session.  ^ he  resolution, if eventually approved by the assembly would put the UNO on record  a ? fevering the following principles in connection with the in-  h?ft?^ IOn ?  gatherin «  a nd distribution of news;  J. All sources of news, particularly official sources, shall be tion*    without    discrimina-  cfcaii K^ 1 tra " smis sion facilities ? ti?  equ t n *» pliable to all.  e ‘i e s  i 1 be a  minimum of official regulation of the flow of news itself.”  ™«f° PeZ n °u Proposes that the conference be held at the permanent site of the UNO at the assembly s second session, that arwngements be made for it by  hLl !ff? mb ? y and  that all member states be represented by an  officials?  number ot  newspaper  lni ra ^ ite< J J*} China last week-?." d .  f ? r  ‘ r . laI . together with a Captain Waco, member of Sa-^ a df, s  court martial which con-victed the Doolittle fliers.  ♦Jr i mom H ra told the  Associated Press in an exclusive interview shortly before his arrest  fnp S  ti?®    ^ at    res P°usibility  In ,! h ?u  a ? n L en i s  execution rest. ed with high Tokyo and China  fnnI?Jii  a ? th °ugh their deaths followed his assumption of command.   f u _ 7 bad ve ry little interest in  hI?n Ca w e  K ecau ? e il  already had been decided in the past,” he  sa d He declared the Sawada’s court merely made recommendations, and that death orders were issued by Tokyo.  Either wartime Premier Hide-ki Tojo or Field Marshal Gen. ^f‘ yama -~ wbo  since has com-  ST;. cu- Ulclde “- slgned  the orders, Shimomura added.  persons from the wrecked liner Yukon, which broke in two in a vicious gale on the rocks of Johnstone Bay. was reported earlv to-a J  y   4  th ,^ Ketchigan Chronicle. About IOO were landed on the nearby beach by breeches buoy, the Chronicle reported, and the rest are in Seward or aboard the ut man troops various vessels whicn overcame  endan gering the northland gale in tedious but peace, might find unacceptable I successful rescue operations The hi? v?? mpr0, y is £  p i’ oposal  made report said the rescue snips'were by Norman J. O. Makin of Aus- Presumably taking all of the sur-trMia, chairman of the security vivors to Seward, where 50 had IS™ .    ,    j    Previously been landed.  Answers from both the British **  Voikuil lays ll. S. (an't HoM lip To Pre-War Oil Output  I by name, said that a White House announcement of the formula might come today. However, another reported that disagreements had developed late yesterday w hich could force further j delay.  Both agreed, however, that the governments position on steel price increases — kev „o settling the walkout of 750.000 CIO steel woi kers—would be stated either simultaneously with announcement of the wage-price policy re* vision, or immediately after-{ wards.  Bowles, Snyder At Odds  VV hat disagreements had developed remained unclear. Reportedly. they involved OPA Administrator Chester Bowles and Recovery Director John Snyder, Who had been at odds on the price question for some time.  It was obvious, however, thai I President Truman’s advisers were working under neaw pressure to bring out the policy statement as quickly as possible. Un-less the hearing is aga.n postponed, Bowles is scheduled to testify on wage-price policy before a congressional committee tomorrow*.  Murray Summons Conference  Lendmg weight to belief hero that a major break ;s due in tho  (Continued on Page 2 Column 2)  Says Germans Sole 736 Freight Train Loads of Art  I    ’ #  ’  NUERNBERG. Germany. Feb.  7 he Germa ns stole 73«  J freight tram loads of art in western Europe, including paint-  I    and  ti* . French prosecutor  {nhuna h i e ,^‘r at,0n?1 m “ iUry   Furthering the war crime*  th* F  3ga rV  22 rankin >? Nazis, toe French charged that the Germans contended that such seiz-urea should be considered mere-^ an indemnity for "sacrifices Jewry.-”  stru «« Ie  against Charles Gertoffer. the prose*  an = r V i a ‘c  Germa, ’y established °° t;ng  l Uff  “"der Alfred Rosen ber g. which frequently  its entire attention upon collecting for Hermann Goermg. He said the German required 21.438 freight cars  tion.  W ould Give It Run-Around  I ^ u n effort to  break the dead-  tbe  breeches buoys, and" KS prwentedTn the VhinTof to J n l T e t" . Russia-S  lienee "*8ht Brig Gen. Harry Johnson Icial series of business^ tudies dis” rn^nn  b  troops in Greece [L* w  ® v *. r the scen ^  ar * d  reported tributed by the University*^ bur’ menace world peace and Britain’s , s . u *7 1Vors on the  were eau of economic and busing demand for outright rejection of buddled around bonfires.    |    research    business  that charge, the compromise pro- ’, Apparently no lives had been Before the war  SSS? K SU K P y -  wo “ ld  dismiss the. 1*^!’    .VV 3 * 1     guard cutter On- furnished approximately ii T  case by having the council pass I 91?  ga * which took o;f the first cent of th#» nation** t i  on to other business.    j8 women and children by power I requirement^  Vo  U 9 .^oorgv WASHINGTON Feb 6 t*  a    ?SSS    r^ d „f     m B£ I    X«S « headquarters cent «    ^    «j  Gen. Bradley Says Accusation False  WASHINGTON. Feb. 6 Gen. Omar N. Bradley says  ments and the expressed view's of other members of the council. Russia is the only council member attacking the British position in Greece.  Presumably this method of dismissing the case would allow  «un    claim    exoneration.  while Russia would not be forced to vote on a statement clearing Britain, w'hich Vishinsk/ already mis made clear he would veto. ^ void , Direct Repudiation  This formula w'ould gvoid any direct, formel repudiation of Russia s charges which «s .he thing that up to this time Bevin has insisted he must have.  aoS OI Ti?     coun cil members  said that if the British and the Russians do not agree to accept the proposed compromise by the time the council is scheduled to meet tonight the session probably _would be called off.  -Mrs.  Three (Hies Hive Surplus ol Jobs .  WASHINGTON, Feb. 6.—(/P)— la u  r  department today lilted Washington, D. C., Peoria, 111 and Richmond, Va., as the only ™ POr *  nt c ^* es  In the country seekers"^  more  Jobs than job-   C ’ Goodwin, director of ®* employment service, declared a sharp rise in January unemployment reports was caused by seasonal trends, a reconversion slow-down and “the recent heavy influx of returning -mu------------—  veterans.”     g     There    appeared    to be    a    wide-  . A USES survey as of Feb. I    JKS!.     4  rea ction    against    last  showed a jump from 18 to 31 in     g     technique    of    call    ng    a    full  the number of labor - market 1  f? 55101 * ^ be  11-member council _______  areas reporting “severe” unem!l the ? recessing it while the re pre-I an emergencVTafl Yrouaht^hi ployment. A labor surplus was  senta trves of the five major pow- manager with the front ri™? reported f rom  eg areas.    S^T 8 ^®. Russia, the United keys.     6 fr ° nt door   -  U ?E s s a id the total population I  Slates ’ Franee and China—and I „      fc—_  m the ‘severe” and “surplus” ‘  one  ° °thers met outside in ., NOWATA, Okla., Feb. 6 GR_  ? h  r ' a *,« 36,400,OOO-oi- more! Secret -    .    |Nowata county commissioners  than half of the 69.000.000 popu-1    --- - termed “misleading'’ a recent  lation included in all of tun inn P.-T„n _    State hiohrva,. __*  sSmHV" ~ I     h  a *  from the scene expressed iWi 1  oirLt  tha Jf  a .  tem P° rary  shortage  dence that all aboard would 1^ Ll em ands of ihJ  tre niendous saved.    ,  aeTr,and s of the invasion forces.  Really Engrossed In Her Shopping  DETROIT, Feb. 8.-0P)-Harry Lutomski, engrosred in shopping for furniture in a down-  salesman'* ^  TueSday ' ‘°‘ d a  niTa’lfyoV”*  S0me,hins 1 want >  h.,^ ! K. S „i' ut 2 ms . ki  * e Iephoned her husband who kept her company  by making comforting signs  through the store’s window until  trying to dismiss 46.Ha non se vice-connected cases irom its ho-pitals.  The veterans administrator di dared in a lotto all engr.-members the accusation wi made by John Stoll- nation: commander of the legion and te cgraphed to department con ma riders of the organization  .r........    suites  more than a question of differences in points of view of major   1  oMhe advocates 8 ©f^seSf 1 ?eon- DoniH Cl^  U ff  <)rganszat: °n W  I tamed industry versus those who ! T»?i Glaacoff. legion ad utai  I favor development of iore.gn velterdat? radIey 53  resources.    yweraaji in his letter, is ‘abs  .,“ The  continued functioning of truth”  Wlthout fou ndation the economic structure of the! Hf  United States is at stake”    I    I     add ed    he was denying it  If a search for alternative sup- assure™ a’r??*  menib 9 rs  *  ma y r Dulles is made in this country I    ♦     y     ., constlt uents wj  Dr. Voskuil said? “there ?s  no  ’     y ° U   shortage of such materials as  natural gas in the Texas Panhan- ”    -  • *u an 2  Kansas  areas, oil scales  than half of the 69,000,000 popu-,    ,    ________  included in all of the 132 GUTHRIE Okla Feh h rn  stale h, «hway commission an- a b° r -mHiket areas from w hich Policeman W O Ward recover     of an  extensive farm-  ^    recoxer- ;  to-market road program for this  a ?i! es, x  co 9j deposits, tar sands in I Alberta Canada, and domestic vegetable sources for motor fuel.  Dr. Lhudieid Will Be Jaycee Speaker  TH'  PESSIMIST  Bf Bo* Hlaika, Jaw   •    —• * at grad ll  reports were received.  po;  None of the reports include workers directly involved in cur-u?*} strikes, Goodwin explained, but they did cover unemployment trends in areas where w'ork stoppages were indirectly affecting industry.  G/!, ate A r  returns" for aimount invested—Ada News Classified Ads.  G/ficers of the Ada Jaycees feel i that they have an especially at- I tractive program for tonight’s meeting for Dr. A. Linscheid. president of East Central  State  cd a, bicycle stolen from his son  ' *ke*bike d •'part bo^ faid^^'    •» ‘he I EUSTIS ZVS&'J  ?r d J°!l!?lP ar ‘ s . i , n  widely scat-  C y but they ha'wXSdlottS j thfprobto^of hou]i„‘^f t   ab ‘, ,Ut   LAVERNE, Okla~Feb., 6. OFI— much'nfo're "good "for" 1  em.nlv    °L ,ba .™ llege    here     and    wdj  Mayor Artie Cronk has called a special election for Feb. 26 on  much more roads.*  good for county  a proposed $75.000 bond^issue for Alv^hamhJ?*’ ^ eb  ’  6 ’  The   a city sewer svstem    I * chamber of commerce has   er  system.    , set up a $10 000 bu(Jget fof  ^  make specific recommendations i on w’hat the Jaycees can do to alleviate the situation.  Greater returns for amount in- I vested—Ada News Classified Ads. *  Step on th* gas, an’ sisters, ther*  brothers ain’t any  ~ , -..V* c* aaa V I  shortage o cemetery lots.  Wed hate t’ be a woman an have t’ reconvert ever* time th’ season changed.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

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Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

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Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

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Your Membership Includes:
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Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

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"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

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