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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 5, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 5, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Tis said thot the mills of the gods grind slowly, but they ore out of dote when compored with the slowness with which somt government agencies get around to taking definite actions..., Partly cloudy and much colder with strong northerly winds to- night. Wednesday fair and colder THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS -12nd 219 Seeks Allied Aid ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1946 L-ron Jcrir.cr premier of headed that coun- trv i DC ill" government in 1635. hai been appointed am- to seek in solving France's prc.'cnt tinaricial criiis. It :s reported France n U. S. !san of aboj: MacArlhur's Promise Good In Lett Than Six Months Scf, He's Cut Occupation Forces to Men TOYKO. Fcb 5. less the six months he liad set Gcnfral M.-.cArthur made good h.s plan to rut States occupation forces in Japan to 200.000 men. T.-.c.-o nro 203.817 Ameri- can officers .-ind enlisted men in today, and that includes tne force, headquarters figures show. the surrender five months sen. MicAithur lias sent home _. ___ _. _. unacr t.-.e point'system, supreme court's rejection of Lt. Pacific veterans froin for- Gcn- Tomoyuki Yamashita's death ces in Japan. The maximum occupation ftrcngtr. probably was County Angus Men Get Five At Auction Purchase Part of Animals At Sunbeam Farms Auc- tion, Where New Record Set Aberdeen Angus cattle to be added to Angus Angels in Hern- ford Heaven arc increasing stead- ily, with five animals from the Sunbeam Farms at Miami being returned to this area to be added to already established herds. Charles Bates, Guy Shipe and George Smith and Son purchased Angus cattle to be placed in their herds in Pontotoc county. Ralph L. Smith, Kansas City, Mo., multi-millionaire lumber- man, set a new world's record for a berf-tvpe female, paying 000 for the animal. Several cat- llemcn placed their bids on the animal, but Smith kept right on coing until he had purchased the female. Buys Kill of Famed Bull Shipe and Smith of Ada pur- chased one animal each nnd Bates purchased three, including two heifers and a bull to be added to his already famous herd. Hates said that he purchased two half sisters to the heifer that sold Monday: they are also half sisters to Prince Eric of Sunbeam, that sold for 000 a couple of years ago, Mr. Bates has some daughters Just o Couple of Freshmen Dad and daughter, fellow freshmen at Pennsylvania Stale Col- iCgc, icdm up to cio their homework whilp Mnm rii 01 Bill and is In classes with WsTs-year-cld (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Yamashila Decision Places Military In War (rimes Charge TOKYO. Feb., 5, U. S. r.rn penning in sentence appeal leaves final de- cision up to General MacArthur and confirms that "the trial of war crimes definitely is a re- and other Liner Breaks Under Pounding of Waves Vessel Aground on Alaskan Coast Breaks In Two After 47 Rescued from 496 Aboard; Other Ships Rushing Aid KETCHIKAN, Alaska, Fcb. men, res- cued after they were washed overboard from the wrecked steamship Yukon, landed at Seward today in an army tug and were quoted by the Kctchikan Chronicle as saying they believed 20 persons were unaccounted for when "they left FIVE CENTS THE Lebanon And Syria Submit New Hot Issue Ask Withdrawal of British, French Troops; Russia Raises Veto Power Issue By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER LONDON. Feb.. 5, and Lebanon handed the United Nations security council a new cxplosition issue today, asking withdrawal of all British and French troops from the Levant, while the council still sought to unravel the tangle resulting from a Russian attempt to use the veto power in the Soviet-British dis- agreement over Greece. The veto issue, raised for the Chiang Kai-Shek first time before the council, Hold the Line Price Policy Faces Change Russia, China Talk Business Chiang Admits Discussions On Concessions; Again Hints He'll Quit Politics By SPENCER MOOSA CHUNGKING. Feb., 5, (.Ti- the Yukon. Pacific- Island the exact figure is not available. Mac, r.ounce reduce within six months surprised Washington. President said he- Imd not known of but it v.-ould speed dis- Tin- state department roted t.vat sucri a cut must not in- tTfi-re the army acting as Fir. instrument to <-arrv out oc- Allied headquarters officers, reporting these conclusions today, said that Mai-Arthur has had the no indication when he might act, ai The supreme court held that the L. S. military trial commis- sion proceeded legally in trying, convicting and sentencing Yam- ashita to the gallows for condon- ing wholesale war atrocities in The coast guard said it had no conformation of any casualties, and expressed doubt concerning the report from Seward. The three survivors were re- porter in good condition, though they had been against a cliff by heavy seas be- I fore the tug crew rescued them. They were identified as: Army Sgt. Jnck Reinhold. Charles D. Scrivener, junior Weather (hanging From Springlike To New Spell of (old Yesterday's weather report for, Ada and this area doesn't read "f the Yukon. like that which is scheduled for Robert D. Bassette, storekecp- Wcdnesday. er the Yukon. The 68 degree maximum of Tno coast cutter Onon- Monday was spring like in Its 'dafia also docked at Sweward to- 1 J_______ r ,1'itU l____ Blocked action on the Greek ques- tion. It also required the coun- M! to decide whether Britian and Russia could vote on the ques- tion of whether British troops in rreece were endangering world Dcnce. as charged by Russia. The British have demanded complete "xoneration of their actions in Jrcrce. Say Troops Are Meance Syria and Lebanon, forme French mandates in the strategi ruddle Kast, based their ease on he claim that British and Frencl roons have remained in theii erritorirs "many months" after he end of the war with Germany ind Japan and that "some o hcse_troops have been a constant nenace to the peace and securitv n this region." A meeting of representatives of lie five major powers Britain Russia, France, China nnd the United was called at the British foreign office today spec- ifically to discuss the world food situation and possible United Na- tions action on it. told a press conference today that "informal1" But Russia Raises Veto Issue some- officials specuated that the meeting might afford a chance for the kev nations f the. security council to have private talk about ways out of the threatened impasse. Shaken by disagreement, the council scheduled another meet- ing for p. m. p. m. Eas- tern Standard Time) tonight to decide formally whether Russia Chinese Reds Want Manchurian Deal Inifruct Chou to Srorf Ne- gotiating on Unsettled Manchurian Problem Br JOHN RODERICK ii.NAN. Fcb. Replying today to the dissent- ers opinion that Yamashita was ______. j hurried to trial under an improp- er charge and was given insuf- mildness and the 60 degree over- night low was, if anything, even more so. Ada got .14 of an inch of rain in a series of early morn- ing thunder showers. day with 47 men and children rescued from the steamship last night. Some of the women and children rescued from the stcam- the ficient time to prepare an ade- quate defense, MacArthur's legal Col Tilma coiner weather Lol. Talma Carpenter, WPSt and ccntra, scctions today 5- Chief said. "Yamashita was given seven army officers, experienced at- torneys, as his defense counsel and he expressed his satisfaction with their qualifications and ef- forts. "In addition, lie was given and exercised the privilege of select- ing an additional defense attorney of his own nationality. The char- ges coming across the state. Tiie Associated Press quotes further rescue attempts. Storm Center Leaving Wireless and telephone com- "much colder" weather "'irT the were improving to- returned and center moved off the weather bureau as expecting _ i today i as daylight returned and and cold expected to stav through cen Thursday, beginning to'warm tin i southeastward, again slightly Friday and w riln another period of rain or sn and colder weather next wc< Andrei Vishmsky, Soviet vice commissar of foreign affairs, af- ter seven members of the 11-na- tion security council said last night in a heated debate that Rus- sia's charges against Great Bri- tain were unfounded. French authorities estimate a- bout 5.000 French troops and 20 000 British troops are in the Le- vant. The Syrian-Lebanese note was dispatched to the office of Sec- retary.General Trvgvc Lie last night. Fairs Bey El Khoury. head of the Syrian delegation to the general assembly, and Hamid Bev Frangie. chief of the Lebanese delegation, conferred personally with Lie today. Claim Sovereignty Threatened "The presence of these troops, which constitutes a grave in- fringement of the sovereignty of I the two states, members of the end. As clamp, balmv weather I all survivors were be- overnight, light pre- Meet Nobuhiko Higashikunl, first grandson of Emperor Hiro- hito of Japan. He is the son ol Princess Teru, the Mikado's old- est daughter and Moriatsu Hi- gashikuni, son of the former Japanese, prime minister. The baby was born in a Tokyo pal- ace air-raid shelter, lit by can- dles and flashlights, during an air raid on March 10, 1945. discussions looking toward econ- omic concessions to Russia by China are taking place. The generalissimo also hinted lie might retire from active poli- tical life after a constitutional democracy is established. Asked if he would be a candi- date for president when elec- tions are held under the project- ed now constitution, Chiang said "I haven't thought of that. As far as I am concerned, as soon as (he power of government is restored to the people I have fin- ished my responsibility." lib Second Hint ..That was the second time with- in a week that Chiang had hint- ed he might not remain in office after the elections. Constitution- al revisions are to be presented to 'he national assembly May 5. Chiang's acknowledgement that Russia was seeking economic con- cessions was made at a conference with foreign correspondents, who asked if discussions looking to concessions beyond published terms of the Sino-Sovict treaty were in progress. Chiang at first replied "no for- mal discussions are taking place between the Chinese central gov- ernment and the Soviet govern- ment. Russian Talks Are Informal However, Chiang replied in affirmative when pressed to sav whether this indicated informal discussions were taking place His statement followed renew- al of rumors that Russia is de- manding joint ownership and control of mining and other'en- terprises in Mntichuria. These rumors were sharpened by the _ to Chungking of Chaing Premier Hidcki Tojo. viang-Su, special commissioner "Roughly speaking, there were r economic affairs discussions I two m the army." said Chiang said General Marshall's tllc defendant, who is charged activities would center question of reorganizing armed forces. These would in- political problems "in which IP might render assistance" Marshall. President Truman's special envoy, recently hclned ar- Grandson Homma Says Tojo Fired Him Because He Was Pro-British By WAYNE RICHARDSON MANILA, Feb.. 5, Lt. Gen. Masaharu Homma testified at his war crimes trial today that he was removed from his Philippine command in August. because of pro-British tendencies and be- cause he disagreed with ex- center on the j with responsibility for the deaths anizing China's of American and Fillipinos. continued cipitation was reported "in most sections of the state. with cve_r.v reasonable op- nPoka' hijd" C.n the "r. the hcaatjur, bi ane motional i party :l, unll.v Prepare its case, in- .i-ettied .M.mchuriah ns acccss to documentary evidence to be used by the cution." Carpenter said tiie court's de- cision had "cleared the road ahead for the trial in Yokohama of a great number of suspected Japa- nese war criminals." U. J. Scraps Planes in Europe Militarily Obsolete And Have No Peacetime Use rs uiced that the of March 'i delay a unlinked peace in demarui eon- fivi-rnmi-nt in .'.at one  hr s-.milla'7 advisory grouo n China depended upon consul- tations with the U. S. govern- Asked if he had received any guarantees that the communists would give up their private j. Suqqesls Family 'Bill of Rights' will be drawn up in .such a way that it will ensure the mainten- Jnce 'n the Levant of sufficient In toward the bleak Krnai pen-'! ,to Ruaranteo security un- sula from mativ points of the! sucl' tlmn ns tnp United Na- ASHINGTON, Feb. ____ returns f.-r amount in- vested-Aria News Classified Ads. JWEATHER! ____., -1 O.-.Ix-.ori.a cloudy and broken up are !27 B-17 flving fortresses and 36 B-24 liberators bombers which pulver- ized Hitler's defenses from long range. There are also 1.159 P 47 Thun- 1 -i.fli fighters. 180 LiRhtninR A-20 Havoc licht bombers. Rliders and scores of miscellaneous craft. lers. 308 tu .n forecast for Feb. .I-8 i. Kan fllARCE rOM.Mt'NISTS ATTACK CHINKSt: VILLAGES TIKNTSIN. quarters of the Chinese gov- ernment army claimed today communists attacked three vill- ayes north of here Friday and attacks on family It might be well, he continued, if the nation in the future fought for a bill of rights for the family just as it has fought in the past for a bill of rights for the indi- vidual. Mr. Truman made these obser- vations in a letter of greeting to the fourteenth annual convcn- fcrence on family 'life which opened a four-day session at Catholic University. compass surged other ships to aid i tjons organization has decided on the organization of collective sr- curilv in tlm (the Levant) French. Britixh Disagreed "Until these arrangements have been carried out, the French gov- the Onondaga, and the army's gre'it aircraft was to wing in from the Aleutian chain to lend a hand. Gen. DeLos Kmmons at anchorage ordered all B-17 fly- ing fortresses equipped with pow- er boats to join the life saving attempt. The report said the wo must achieve this objective. General Marshall is. exertine his efforts in that direction. The generalissimo said lie still wanted to visit the United States and would go there with Madame Lhiang when opportunity per- Mae- i and With civil strife'in'chi'na rnd- ec. the question of sending Chinese troops to Japan is being reconsidered. China previously 'aid she was not in n position t" send an occupation force. Service M. Fillipinos. was pro-German and the oilier pro-British. The latter fostering liberal ideas, was in great minority. 1 was supposed to heiid the latter group since I was the most senior officer. This was so. I believe, because I had my training in England and my association with the British ole gave me a broad outlook on life." Homma. testifying for the first time in his own behalf, said that he had incurred the disfavor of lojo by objecting to the latter's appointment as minister of war. He said that when Tojo was war minister, there remained no lib- eral-minded officers on the Japa- nese general staff or in the war department. He said Tojo "was trained in Germany and headed the pro- German group." "I maintained that if he were chosen i In Trade For Labor Peace Administration Expected To Allow Some Price Boosts To Get Production Going By UII.UAM NEEDHAM WASHINGTON. Feb. administration decision that the nation can afford to pay some higher prices in return for industrial peace and all-out pro- duction appeared in the making today. A high government official, who can not be identified fur- ther, predicted the White will issue an announcement to- day or tomorrow, detailing changes in the present "hold- the-line" price policy. Although the modification will be aimed primarily at settlement of the 15 day old steel strike, this official said, its terms also will apply to other major tries involved in wage disputes. Bowles Is Key Figure Key figure in any such revi- sion of President Truman'i wage-price orders is OPA Ad- ministrator Chester Bowles, wha presumably outlined his position to the President during 50- minute conference. Bowles, it is understood. gued for an policy change, as against "flex- ible price control advocated by Reconversion Director John W. Snyder. Bowles has contended that any special concession on prices for the steel industry would start series of "emergency" conces- sions which would threaten OPA s whole svstem of controls. Snyder Swinging urer There were indications that the price chief was beginning to win Snyder over at least in part to his views. One White House official told a reporter the reconversion di- rector now is "inclined favor- ably to Bowies' argument and that the two men seemingly reached a working agreement. This official, who said he ex- pected the approaching House announcement to repre- sent a "substantial revision of the wage-price policy, added that its net effect should not drastic. Will Screen Requests The point was madi- that Stab- ilization Director John C. Col- let still will have to pass on re- quests for many price rises and that these requests will screened carefully. Of compelling "importance, is the fact that the effects of tha steel tieup are hitting industry in automobifa the num- ber of workers idle because of enforced shut-downs mounting swiftlv. Court Rules On Fund Allocation OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb. 5__ pictured himself as an army chief who was not inform- ed of all incidents under his com- mand, did not appoint his staff officers and bad not authority to remove them. noli. eminent will retain forces grouped in Lebanon." Progress toward carrying nut J initial withdrawal from Sy- WASHINGTON. Feb. re- j Truman today author- ized the issuance of an honorable e after patt of the Yukon flounder-1 na was deadlocked by a disagre- ed free into the smashing waves cmcnt on where the British troops and was "rolling to starboard." to so.n.f- Tllc French t R t- ic-U 4 A __ Part Still AKraunrl the British forces to re- service button for wartime ser- vice in the merchant marine. The ty for employment of additional patrolmen. The high court agreed yester- day to assume original jurisdic- tion in a test case brought br Norman C. Holt, Kingfisher. which" '5 It was obvious the defense was subordinates' actions. emblem will differ from' the A Klltfrtne The forward p.irt remained I Palestine, a British man- service buttons for veterans of the armed forces but the final design has not been released. Silas Sfrawn Dies Of Heart Ailment Former Head of American Bar Aitociarion, U. S. Chamber of Commerce PALM BEACH. Fla.. Feb. heart ailment proved date. The British wanted to go Ads. PUBLICITY LEADERS FOR CANCER DRIVE CONFER solidly aground. The made a point of saying the salon 'lnt" Lebanon with the French, deck was on the upright forward Under procedure thus far fol- part. lowed, Lie was expected to place Coast Guard headquarters at Syrian-Lebanon request be- Seattle said early today no addi- c n session after of- tional information had been re- circulating it among all 11 fatal yesterday to 70-year-old Silas Hardy Strawn. noted Chi- cago attorney and former presi- a brief and 'C. C. Childers. state auditor, was al- lowed 10 days to respond. Then Holt will have fivo days m which to answer. PONCA CITY. Okla.. Feb. 5 lor housing units for veterans has been made by Ponca City On the basis of one unit ner popu- lation, the officials said. Ponca City is entitled to 25. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Adi ceived, due chiefly to the diffi- culty of radio communications from Kctchikan to the Onondaga. Meanwhile, a specially-equipp- ed first aid train was to leave anchorage at 5 a.m. (PSD. hound for Seward, some :our hours dis- m Fnday or co 1 ci t- r Wednesday. ming until colder Friday or Sat- Headqui ces fought stronger members. on for- lahoma division of the nation- ,.nmn Norman Winter, national pub- communists and .a__.__ i _. some i licitv director. i fighting was still going on. I speaker. be survivors from the wreck. More Ships On IVay Several additional ships were j expected at the scene of the wreck "within a matter of I the coast guard reported. 1 (Continued on Page 4 Column 4) (ounly Schools Put Into 'March' Final report of tho pnrt Hie county schools played in the March of Dimes turned out even better than an earli- er fiRure. The total, according to Norman C. Mitchell, county superintendent, was This represents n large gain over the contribution total of the county schools last year. Read the Ada News Want Ads. IF YOU DON'T GET YOUR PAPER Sometimes the neighbor's dog will carry your Ada News away before you get it from the porch or the boy fails to leave it. In case you miss your paper Call No. 4, before p. m. week days and a. m. Sundays and another copy will be de- livered to you. Circulation Department Phone 4 Commerce of the United States Strawn was apparently in Rood health until he was strick- en. He is survived by his widow, the former Margaret Stewart, and two daughters. Mrs. James A. Cathcart and Mrs. Wesley M Dixon. both of Lake Forest. Ill He arrived here with his wife by automobile last Friday. A member of the Chica'go law firm of Winston, Strawn and Shaw, Strawn headed the cit- committee which raised funds to bring to democratic and republican national conventions to Chicago in He was born near Ottawa 111 Dec 15. lilGC. and it was there that he prepared for admittance to the bar by reading law at night in an office. He served as president of the American bar association in 1927-28 and of the Chamber of Commerce of the Unitcd States in 1931-32. Read the Ada News Want Adi. TH' PESSIMIST Mr Boh niaiki. Jr. When historians start writin' th' story o' World War II they should remem- ber f include th1 battle fer nylons. If you tell th' truth f start with, you won't have t1 talk so much later.   

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