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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 4, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             by viclou, 9Mtip Fair west, cloudy with occasional rain cast; continued mild tonight. 42nd 218 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS U. S. Court Won't Save Yamashita Votes 6-2 to Let Death Sentence Stand for Jop General as War Criminal Feb. The rup.-err.c- court refused today .o save Japanese General Yami- s.iita from death on the galiows. Lfin-f Jur.tice- Stonr- delivered t.-.e 0-J decision. .u-ting as 1 S :n Lurope. h.id no pait in Jii.-tioes Mur- Rutledg. -It that the order of t.ie ronnr.is.-ion (of :vc gcr.e.-als v.-ho trie i Yama- jr.itai was a lawful oidcr. that r.e corr.mi: -ion la-.vfully consti- ,'Vamashi- .god y.-ith Violation of ir and that the com- to proceed r.r.d in doing so did Vio..v.e any mihtuiy. slatu- or cyir.rtitutional command." Cncoiiutrd t-Jtrd. ..i> rh. :.v.v riisr.nn autf-. Atrocities r-.arhi r tar-.ar was conv U. S. Still Looks East Europe No. 1 Pcacc-Timc Problem Despite Huge Stake We Have in Pacific HONOLULU. Feb. 4. _ _ Largely because Kurope has pos- ed more peace-time problems America's interest is still more Miarply focused on the Atlantic .ban on tho Pacific.. Robert Mc- Lean, president o ftho Associated Press and of the Philadelphia Lvemng Bulletin, said here to dav. i McLean, accompanied by Nor- man Chandler, publisher of the Los Angeles Times, and B. M ..IcKolway. associate editor of tho Evening Star nr- iivcd here yesterday from the Lnitcd States on a tour of the orient. I Although the United States has a big stake in the Pacific, Mc- Lean 5aid he still saw Europe as ir.e number one American for- i-ign news interest because of troubles encountered in the ad- ministration of occupied Ger- many. "Wo haven't done so well in J-.uropo since the war's ending he explained, "while things have KOIIP smoothly in the Pacific. "This situation tends to throw the interest where the trouble bid for statehood, Mc- ADA. OKLAHOMA. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1916 How Could a Kid Resist? -von :n ..Inaila of conducting un- cour.'.ed atrocity by invad- :.ic_ troop? :n the Philippines. me enemy general was the war leader to be .Tied as a v.-ar criminal. In ap- to the fuprcmi? court he the- military com- n-ji have authority Stone said: "We have considered, but find unni-ccjsarv to discuss other i nn.f-r.tior.s i by Y a m s h i t a) wc tc> bo without t All U as Lawful  are protecting "ie submarine could survive the A-bomb threat. Ihe three atomic bombs explod- nH en fin _ od so far showed feet. So it could crater ef- presumed ,l, the blast and pressure would not h ITI submerged undersea boat. (The three bombs, however have boon exploded in the air' Ihe new tests will include one at-surface and one under-surface detonation as well as the initial experiment of a burst sex-oral hundred feet above the anchored target ships.) The discovery of nuclear fis- sion may in itself aid the sub- marine. If a way is found to har- ness atomic energy to machinery it could mean a faster submarine' wi It great space-saving in pro- pulsion machinery and a corres- ponding increase in range aiid weapons. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Tugboat Workers Outr Hits Gotham Food, Fuel Supply NEW YORK, Feb., 4 f.n_ strike by tugboat workers supported by longshore- men, tied up shipping in the vast New York harbor today cut _ off a large portion city s food and fuel supj The workmen, members of Police Checking On Fires in Chicago Series of Flames in Con- gress Hotel Probed; One Man Suffocated Wife of K.C. Star Editor Is Dead Greater returns for amount in- I News Classified Ads. SHAWNKE. Okla.. Feb. Dr. A. Hope Owen, member of lie executive board of tho Okla- i the editor homa Baptist General Conven- I Star, died lion, has announced his resigna- tion as pastor of tho First Bap- tist church hero to become pastor of the First Baptist church of Plain view. Tox. .Ho will take ovi-i- the Plain- view church March 1. Dr. Owen has been pastor at Clinton and Miiskngoc, Okla., urn! at Santa Fe and Albuquerque. N. Mex.( com- ing here from Albuquerque four and a half years ago. KANSAS CITY. Feb. .Mrs. Henry J. Haskr-II, wifo of of the Kansas City early today m her sleep at the Haskell home. Death came a few hours after tho Haskell s had observed their l.ilh wedding anniversary. Mrs. Har.koll was the widow of the late Gov. Herbert S. li.idley of Missouri, who died in 1.127. Survivors, in i-ddition to Mr. Haskell, include n son. Maj. John CHICAGO. Feb. po- lice arson squad today was in- i vestigating a of Sunday fires in tho Congress Hotel, his- toric Michigan Avon.io show- placo. which brought death to ono man and injuries to per- sons. Frank J. Van Hoesen, 3.1. Roch- ester, N. Y., paint and wallpaper oxeculivc, suffocated during a tiro which started at ti-nn a m and burned through fifth and sixlh floor rooms. Many of the hoU-l's guests I wero routed from beds and some fled down lire escapes or dropped out of windows to lower level roofs. Karlier, the hotel staff had put out two small blazes with hand extinguishers, and around a fourth fire binned out rooms. Fire Marshall Anthony liinev estimated the total I ami declared .so many tires in such a short time "look's suspicious." Chief of Detectives Storms dim-tod the polio- Koo Hopes Man Will Avoid Catastrophe China Leader Mar- shall; Says Japs Knew War Lost Early in 1944 LITTLK HOCK, Ark.. Feb. 4 T' Z- WoHcl ti'avel- er of .Shanghai. China, expressed hope here today that man will be smart enough to avoid a "push button war" which could destroy the world s populations. The distinguished atomic visitor said energy in peace offers all of Iifos necessities, but in war it could mean suicide. Failure of nations to settle thoir differences on a "give and i- W1" Palpitate World III, he told the Arkansas U.-uotte m an interview. There would be no World War IV. he added, because "no one would be left to fight." Dr. Koo praised Gen. George C. Marshall for the work he has done in helping unify China. Tho traveler said he left Shang- hai on foot in October, 1344 en route to the San Francisco con- ference, and walked Had miles to Chungking whore he obtained air transportation to the United Sta- tes. "In the spring of 1944 tho Japs decided they had lost the war. so J. Mill- j more lenient in their at I theatment of us." he said. "A high Japanese official told me because Japan had acciuirod so many Pacific islands it would no lunger need the resouices of and of the supplies. i i -nembers of local 333, United Marine Division of the AFL International Long- Association, officially left their jobs at a. m. (EST) with the tugboat operators, or- ganized as the New York TUB- boat Exchange. Josph p. Ryan, oresident of the ILA, said the longshore- men of the parent union would support the walkout by refusing to load or unload any shin which normally would be handled by tho strikers. Morning meetings were sched- uled with both union and com- pany officials by Kdwnrcl C. Moguiro. labor advisor to Mnvor O Dwyor. and William C. Liller of tho U. S. conciliation service in an attempt to settle the strike. The union itself planned a membership meeting later today. Troopships. returning GI's Home from abroad, will not be affected. They will bo serviced by army tugs. Only other shipp- ing expected not to be disrupted consisted of railroad-owned tugs and few boats owned by two oil companies. Navy tugs are not affected. U. S. CHINA. FRANCE LINK UP TO SUPPORT BRITAIN LONDON. Feb. ward Stottinius, Jr.. proposed today that the security council dismiss Russia's charges that British troops in Greece con- stituted a threat to peace. TT T S of the United States is satisfied that there is no reasonable ground for a belief that the presence of British troops in Greece can regarded as constituting a sit- uation likely to endanger world peace and security." the U S delegate said. Following Stettinius. Foreign Minister George Bidault of France said he could not see that the British troops wero a menace to peace" in the envisaged in the charter of the Lnited Nations Dr. V. K. Wellington Koo of China endorsed Strttmius' move to dismiss the Russian complaint. give the lie to that." He spoke after Vishinsky, in 90-mmute statement, had chall- enged Bevm's friendliness ft. ward Russia in telling the secur. ity council last Friday that the real danger" to world peace was propafiarula the _ not unfriendly toward Russia, Bevin said in his detail- ed rebuttal, delivered for most part in a calm, slow voice! I just want equal treatment." Honor Involved He did not say what equality ho had in mind. Bevin declared that in the charge brought against Britain by Russia "the honor of my coun- try and the British wealth is involved." He denied emphatically that Britain was in any way endan- goimg Iho peaco of world and that if V.shmikv onl y believed it was. tiien Bov- m should not be m the council. common- security "This charge has caused bitter. ness in the hearts of the British USMC Reserve To Include Aviation Corps Outlines Plans For Ready Unit and o Stand- by Component noon eight arson squad to investigate and and there could be peace posU-d guards in the corridors of between the two countries again tho__ 14-story hotel. _ Florida is tho noxt place on Dr. Koo's itinerary, followed by countries in South America, wh.M o he plans to spend the next four months. iiiiiuiif ,i .son. ftiaj. John M. Haldey, Washington. D.C.. and Mrs. Warren B. Lambert, Clay- ________ton, Mo. Read the Ada New, Want Ads. Read" the Ada New. Want Ads. Columbian exposition, is known locally as tin- stopping placo of presidents. From Grov- Cleveland to Franklin D. Roosevelt, they all had occupied its presidential suite. From to the hotel was tenanted by the army air forces who used it for a radar school It was reopened to the public last Aug. 1. Hrrlt Klcctcd OKLAHOMA CITY, Feb 4 of John Brett as- sistant United States district at- torney, as president of the state council of churches was an- nounced today. WASHINGTON. Fob.. 4 <.r_ Tho post-war organized reserv, of the marine corps will includi aviation as well as infantry nn< supporting arms. The corps outlined plans for it; peacetime reserve ostablishmen today, announcing it would be made up of a ready unit and a stand-by component. Units o the organized reserve will be located in as many areas "as are consistent with other military considerations." Gen. A. A. Van- dergnft. marine commandant said. Training of tho reserves will bo integrated with the fleet marine force to make it possible for all men to keep abreast of now developments. Officers may accept temporary nclivo duty either within or out- side the United Stales. Members of tho organized reserve will be required to attend weekly two- liour drill perform active duty training in tho field for two week's each year. Tho stand-by component will ho made up of men living too far from units of tho organized reserve- or who for other reasons arc unable to attend weekly drill. They may take two weeks active training yearly. for amount in- News Classified he said, because true." Bevin spoke about 40 minutes government and he British people taken action m Greece or elsewhere to en- danger the peace of ha asked in conclusion. "On that I nsk an answer. I plcnd Wlth .von either absolve us or brand us us guilty." Vishinsky' told the council ear- icr that "nothing worse could have been said" than Bevin's as- sertion last Friday that propa- ganda from Moscow was a danger to peaco. The Russian vice commissar, to Bevin's defense of policies in Greece against Soviet attack, declared: 'It is the opinion of the Soviet delegation that nothing worse could havo boon said than this declaration of Mr. Bevin's of Feb 1, 1948. "Docs he think that his dec- laration is in harmony .vith what (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) TH' PESSIMIST If a certain amount o' op- position is n holp f a man, then most married men (it more than enough help. f Uncle Lit Bark, who cele- brated 'is eighty-fifth birth- day last week attributes 'is long life f never takin' a motor trip on a highway.   

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