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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: February 3, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - February 3, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             c.mmunicaK.n. .r. wonderful, but h.w many have that can pick up h..f J...n w.vehngfe .no., when any it frem Y.ic., at Increasing cloudiness Sunday, followed hy rain Sunday night. Colder Monday west portion. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 217 Farmers In Rising Cry Of Protest Cleveland Men Would Withhold Produetf, Bryan Countiani Hit Lawmakers NOfl.MAN'. Okla., Fcb. 100 Cleveland county farmers met here today and vot- ed to withhold from the market all farm products until industrial strikes are settled. The mooting followed a similar one at Chickasha. Okla., a week ago and a later session in Clay County. Neb., at which farmers voted to "strike" nftninst indus- ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1D46 FIVE CENTS THE SITE IS SELECTED FOR CAPITAL OF ONO trial dissension. T. 1.. Kichanlron, Norman dairyman, railed the meeting and Rcvnohls. local farmer, pre- sided. The resolution was patsed without a diSM-nting vote. "We the independent patriotic farmers of Cleveland county hereby call on all of the nation to join us in withholding our product.-; from market until the differences of labnr and man- agc.T.cnt are it said. No Food "We further resolve to con- tinue producing as we did during the to withhold it until labor and man- agement arc hungry enough to go bark to work. say to these two groups 'No goods for us. then no food for you.' We decry and condemn the stubborn leadership on both sides which cannot or will not reach a horse sense permanent solution to their difference.'; with- out resorting to strikes and lock- outs, the continuation of which will destroy the future of Amer- ica." Warning to Lawmakers J.Teanwhile 7.1 Bryan county farmers meeting at Durant, Okla., voted to withhold votes from any legislator failing to support n "workable program" to settle industrial strikes. They said they would not withhold produce from the mar- ket. Twelve Die In Cleveland Fire Fire Sweeps Frame Home For Aged After Blast, In- vestigation Promised CLEVELAND, Feb. Twelve of the 62 occupants of Jennings Hall, Catholic home for the aged, died today in im explo- sion and ensuing fire which swept through the one story frame structure. Coroner Samuel H. Gcrber re- ported all G2 occupants of the homo had been accounted for and that a final chuck disclosed n death toll of 12. Previous es- timates were that the loll might reach 40. Seven persons still remained in hospitals but the condition of only one was listed as critical by the coroner. Five other occupants were giv- en emergency treatment at local hospitals but later were sent to homes of relatives or friends. Fire Spreads Fast The flash fire quickly engulfed the tar paper and thin frame walls of the structure shortly af- ter an explosion at p.m. A "thorough investigation" of the blaze will be made, Coroner Gerbcr said. Loss was estimated by Elmer Cam, second assistant lire chief of Cleveland, at The one- story structure was completed June 1. 1942, and named for Msgr. Gilbert P. Jennings, late pastor of St. Agnes Catholic church, who left the bulk of his estate for the erection of the home. Neighborhood In Panic Nimitx Wears 10-Gallon Hat to "Texas Brag Truman Backs Gen. Bradley International City May Be Near Gotham Committee Recommends Tract on New York-Connecticut Border; Hyde Park Among Alternate Sites Submitted President Feels That Stelle In Attack Not Speaking Far American Legion NEW YORK> Fcb" 40 lo 50-squaro mile tract ,the Ncw York-Connecticut border was recom- radley "to the hilt" to- 1 mended today as first choice for the site of an international WOUld CSlablish hcadquar- York City was suggested as interim headquarters Omar N. Bradley Admiral Chester Nimitz shed his gold braided, beribbonnd coat In lavor of a ten gallon hat, red bandanna and two pearl handled ThA to address the first annual "Texas UraR" dinner. The Lone Star State hero was guest of honor at the dinner which featured Texas produce including, inch thick beef steaks and rattlesnake meat, flown in from Texas for the iclcphoto) The explosion panicked the neighborhood. Telephone lines In the resolution they prom- '.nto the suburban police and fire ised to withhold votes from "anv departments were jammed, member of congress who does not lend complete support to workable program which will provide equitable and peaceful means of_scttling disputes." E. O. White, farmer and owner of a farmers' co-operative here, "We do not attempt to take claims of Neighbors helped frenziedly in rescue efforts until fire compan- ies arrived to combat flames in the sub-freezing temperature. More than five hours after the explosion, firemen still searched through the smoldering ruins for persons missing. Those first res- cued were taken across the street to the sisters of the Holy Ghost, or justify the Cither (management or labor) ___ _. but believe there is a middle I 'hen to hospitals. Three were ground where they can and taken to neighboring homes one to Bedford hospital, eight to St. Atcheson Says U. S. Must Get More Food to Europe Even If It Means Less for Home Use WASHINGTON, Feb. of State Dean Acheson said today that the people of this country must increase their sacrifices to relieve starvation in Europe "even if it means a return to wartime conditions in some scc- zhould reach agreement. All The Facts Wanted Tne group demanded that the public be given all of the facts regarding industrial disputes At Stillwater, Okla.. members of the Forest Valley Farmers Lnion. Local No. 5, unanimously parsed a resolution to withhold jr.cat from the markets. The group called on all .farmers "to assist in this effort to delay and withhold food, especially non- perishables. until such time as laoor and industry come to their senses and get back on the iob Membership of the Forest'Val- Jey Union number 120. Select Language For Job Measure Home, Senate Representa- tives Agree on Substitute For'Truman's Request WASHINGTON. Fcb. u. representatives from house and hjt, Alexis hospital and others to St. Luke's hospital. As the search-for missing con- tinued, the Red Cross supplied 50 cots, 100, blankets and food for the survivors in the Gunnery. Fullertonrs Angus Herd to Go on Sale Estate Sale of 50 Sleek Blacks Drawing Buyers From Many States MIAMI, Okla., Feb. Cattle breeders began arriving in Miami today for the story-book achievement sale Monday of the S. C. Fullcrton estate, Aberdeen Angus herd, one of the nation's finest. Fifty sleek black animals, 15 bulls and 35 heifers, have been listed for sale and men and wom- en widely known in the business world will attend. tors of our economy." The substitute goes n-> further tnan to declare it is the "continu- ing policy and responsibility" of the federal government to "pro- mote" maximum employment, production and purchasing pow- Among carlv arrivals for the William G. Mennen, T shaving cream Jack Solomon, owner of the famous Gallagher steak house- Irene Hayes, New York City flor- ist; Leon Cotnareanu, New York perfume manufacturer, and Eu- Geno Denton, owner of a Park Avenue women's dress shop in York. Thirty states and sections of George W. Black, Pioneer of 1904, Died on Saturday George W. Black, who moved to Ada in Indian Territory in 1904 from Alabama and has lived in this area since, died at a local hospital Saturday afternoon. He was 82. Funeral arrangements will be announced later by Criswell Fu- neral Home. Mr. Black was born in 1863 at what was known then as Ealy- town and became Birmingham. Ala. In 1805 he was married and in 1904 the family, by then in- cluding three sons and four daughters, came west. A son and daughter were born hers. A farmer and blacksmith in Alabama, Mr. Black was active president of the Farmers Union when that organization was in its heyday. Only last January he and Mrs. Black, celebrated the 60th anni- versary of their wedding. Surviving are five daughters, Mrs. R. E. L. Worsham and Mrs. Slade Norman of Ada, Mrs George Snoddy of Muskogee, Mrs. Frank Plummer of Okla- homa City Johnson of The measure worked out by Angus Breeding business more conference committee r.till I's thnn a quarter of a century ago subject to approval of both hous- I tnus suggesting the title of the es before it can be rent to the 'ancy purebred stock event, president. Under '.i.e rules, how- ever, congress mujt vote on it as it is. and would have to send it back to the conference for any chance. Senate Majority Leader Bark- Icy hf considered it "a pret- ty good bill." acceptable to con- Stale Official Is Dead of Injuries received today in the col- Burns Kill Tulsa Child TULSA. Okla., Frb. Jne Mill o r. four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. t..Miller was dead today from burns re- ceived when his clothing caught lire while he played near a trash fire at his home. JWEATHER! Oklahoma cloud- :ners Sunday, followed by rairx S'.ur.day night, except in pan- handle and in most portions of Continued mild Sunday, portion. Crildcr Monday west lision of two automobiles here. Fred Kemp, Hnrrah, chief fac- tory inspector, also was injured in the crash. State highway Trooper Bob Lamb said it had not been determined whether Kemp or Martin was driving the vehicle in which they were rid- ing. The two cars crashed head-on, he said. and Mrs. George _. Tyler, Tex.; four sons, Vauda E. and Orlando Black of Ada, Charles and Cullcn Black of North Hollywood, Calif. There are 27 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Five grandsons were in service during War II. one of them. Capt. Or- ville Black, being killed in 1943 in Italy, and two granddaughters served as nurses in government hospitals. Neil Worsham, a grand- son, was for several months a prisoner of war in Germany. Can Go Ahead And Pay for Bounties OKLAHOMA CITY. Feb. Q. Williamson, attorney general, today advised the state auditor's office to pay more than m claims for bounties for killing wolves, coyotes and bob- cats. The attorney general held the apprapriations of a year to be non-fiscal because of word- ing of the statute. The first 000 has been exhausted. Williamson ruled the claims should be paid in regular course until the second is cx- I haunted. "We've won the he said in an ABC network broadcast sponsored by the state depart- ment. "We can't afford to let hunger and starvation defeat us now." But he acknowledged that there will be some starvation in Europe this winter "despite all our prevent it." Acheson r appeal was made as the White House in-ranged for a full-scale review of the lood situ- ation at next Tuesday's cabinet meeting and after Secretary of Agriculture Anderson called upon farmers, in a rndio talk, to cut down on the feeding of grain to cattle, hogs and poultry. Our Grain Supply Short Anderson said the nation's sup- ply of corn and other livestock feeds is running short. His ap- peal followed on the heels of forecasts by agriculture depart- ment grain experts that the gov- ernment will be unable to get enough wheat from farms to ful- fill export commitments to hun- gry areas abroad. "We cannot go on feeding wheat to our hogs and cattle while people die of as- serted Achcson. "No American would want to do that." He added: Diplomacy Not Enough 'Skillful diplomacy is an emp- ty phrase when you are dealing with a people who face starva- tion, x x x If the people of Eur- ope are hungry and disillusion- ed, democracy will suffer." Will Run for Governor OKLAHOMA CITY, Fcb. D. Key, former democratic state chairman, to- day announced his decision to seek the democratic nomination for governor. "J am going to run." Key said. I will make a formal announce- ment in a few days." Key said the line-up in the gov- ernor s race and the apparent dearth of major candidates hast- to make the gion over the handling of veter- ans problems. John Stelle, national com- mander nf the legion, said in a letter to all congressmen yester- day that there had been V'tragic breakdown" in the veterans ad- ministration under Bradley, that congress should investigate, and that VA needs a "seasoned busi- ness hian" at its head. Bradley "Counterattacks" Bradley counterattacked with a lengthy progress report on the way VA has operated since he became administrator last Aug- ust. Presidential Secretary Charles j. Ross volunteered to reporters today: "I should like to say for the president that General Bradley has the complete and unqualified support of President Truman. "The president does not feel that Mr. Steelo in his attack on Bradley is speaking for the Am- erican Legion. "The president considers that General Bradley has done a fine job under extremely difficult conditions. In other words, he is hacking General Bradley up to the hilt." Rankin Adds Approval That brought a statement from Chairman Rankin (D-Miss) of the house veterans committee that he agreed with Mr. Truman that the general "is doing a splendid job under the most try- ing circumstances" and that Stelle "is not speaking for a ma- jority of the members of the Am- erican Legion in his unwarranted and unjustified attacks on Gen. Bradley." From Ashcville. N. C., Halsey De Leavitt, commander in chief of the United Spanish War veter- ans, telegraphed Bradley the or- ganization's "utnuist confidence" in his administration of veterans' affairs. New until the international capital was constructed. The recommendations were made in a 35-page report by a UNO committee to the United Nations general assembly in Lon- don. Dr. Stoyan Gayrilovic, commit- tee chairman, said nt a news con- ference at the Waldorf Astoria that the report also recommended Hyde Park. N. Y., and the Blue Hills and North Shore areas near Boston as possible sites for the permanent headquarters of the United Nations. He said Boston and Atlantic City had been rec- ommended as alternates for the interim headquarters. Final Decision Soon In London, where the site se- lection was made known simul- taneously with the announce- ment here, the general assembly planned to hear the recommenda- tions formally Tuesday and cx- pected final action by the 51-na- tion body within a week. When the site committee be- gan inspecting the territory with- in BO miles of New York City four weeks ago, Dr. Gavriolovic said "We have in mind a city built as Washington was built more than 100 years ago, only on not such a big scale." Such a city would displace at first about persons now liv- ing in parts of two Connecticut and four New York towns and cause the dismantling of some of the palatial estates which dot the wooded, rolling country of the site. Fashionable Estate Section The center of the area is 33 miles from New York City. For (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) Now Legionnaire Wants Probe Of National Legion Leader __________........._ ffj_ ST. LOUIS, Feb. resolution requesting a circumstances" congressional investigation of John Stelle, national com- mander of the American Legion, will be introduced Monday night at a meeting of Bazan-Bailey Post No. 6 at Moberly, Mo., Rcdrick O'Bryan, a member of the post, said tonight. MIAMI, Okla., Feb. H. A. Berkley who has been as- sociated with the Brown-Dunkin store in Tulsa for more than six months is returning to Miami Monday as Chamber of Com- merce secretary. Greater returns for amount in- Newa Classified Ads. TULSA, Okla., Fcb. Peach trees in some Tulsa coun- ty communities showed little growth during the past year and poor crops can be expected this year, O. J. Moycr, county farm agent, said today. Lady Jane Gray was English queen nine days, hut repair at binnett-Mcaders is lasting. 2-3-lt cned his decision race. "1 think the field is in better shape for inn than it has ever said Key. "I believe the opportunity to be elected is bet- ter for me than it will ever be." No Editor, No Paper FORT SILL, Okla., Feb. want of an editor the field artillery replacement cen- ter s official camp newspaper has suspended publication. The Recorder received its hon- orable discharge after having Dccn published weekly since Nov. 20, 1042. Sgt. R. Marshall htross, will be discharged next week. Ex-Marines Have Situation in Hand Avoid Trains, Crowded Air- lines, Hire Big Plane And Fly Into Dallas DALLAS, Tex., Feb. Eighteen recently discharged ma- landed in Dallas today with he traveling situation "well in land." "Trains are Pfc. J. F. ird, of Dallas said they were old in San Diego yesterday. 'Commercial airlines are filled or a month in advance." But someone found an cx-FIy- ng Tiger who recer.tly had nought and refitted a big army cargo plane. He agreed to take the group to Dallas. They left San Diego at noon yesterday. Motor trouble forced them down at El Paso last night but they took off again at p.m. today and landed here about 3 p.m. Laird said the trip cost him cheaper than the commercial air- line fare. Others making the trip includ- ed: Pfc. S. R. Carman. Gushing. Okla.; Sgt. W. L. Gunn. Malvcrn, Ark.; Pfc. C. L. Haynie, Prescott Ark.: and Pfc. N. O. Hurst, Glen- wood, Ark. R. B. HAYNES. RANCHER OF TULSA COUNTY, IS DEAD SAND SPRINGS, Okla., Feb. 2 B. Hayncs. 75, owner of one of the largest ranches in Tul- sa county died in a hospital to- day from injuries received when his automobile was hit by a Katy passenger train. Haynes was crossing the rail- road track, runnin.i over a por- tion of his ranch west of here. The train crew took him to Osage for emergency treatment and he was later taken to n Tulsa hos- pital. Battle Wounds Of Philippines Fatal To Sgt. Henson Wounds received- in the battle for the Philippines in May o 1945 proved fatal for Pvt. Glei E. Henson, Route 2, Ada, who died at Borden General Hospita at Chickasha Friday night. Funeral services will be held Monday at 2 p.m. from the Pente- costal Holiness church, burial in Rosedale cemetery with military honors. Surviving are the wijow, Mrs LaVina. Henson of Hammond parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. O. Hen- son of Ada: brothers, Muril ol Oklahoma City, Edward of Vir- ginia and Donald Ray Ilenson ol Ada; grandparents, Mr. and Mrs Ed Crawford and Mrs. Margue- rite Henson of Ada. Douglass Will Not Run for Governor TULSA, Okla., Fcb. Frank P. Douglass, Oklahoma City democrat, said today he would not enter the raco for gov- ernor this year. Douglass recent- ly was named a member of the national mediation board. In announcing his intention not to be a candidate. Douglass en- dorsed the candidacy of Dixi.- Gilmcr, Tulsa county attorney, for governor. Gilmcr has indicated that he may make an official announce- ment in the next two weeks. h GLASS CO. WAREHOUSE AT SAND SPRINGS BURNS SAND SPRINGS, Okla., Feb. large warehouse, con- Mining packaged fruit jars was partially destroyed today at the iCrrr Glass Manufacturing Corp. The fire was believed to have started from burning grass. No estimate of damage has been made. Firemen said the building was filled to the ceiling with lackaged jars, making it difficult o combat the flames. Stelle has demanded n congres- sional investigation of Gen. Omar N. Bradley, head of the U. S. Vet- erans' administration. Gen. Brad- ley, whose home is Moberly. is a member of the Bazan-Bailcy post. O'Bryan. who now lives in St. Louis, said he would introduce the resolution and would "follow this thing through and make it hot enough for Stelle that he will resign." He said his resolution will ask that results of the investigation be turned over to the American Legion national executive com- mittee "for appropriate action." "I'd like to see the two men, Bradley and Stelle. both Inves- tigated, so they could be com- O'Bryan said. "Bradley is one of the finest men who ever lived and as honest as the day is long." O'Bryan, a lawyer, former member of the Missouri State executive committee of the Le- gion and a boyhood friend of the general, said he had discussed his proposed resolution with W. G. Pallen. commander of the Mo- berly Post, and that he was "sure it will pass." No Action In Sfeel Strike President Confers With Advisers, No Conclusive Results Obtained By STERLING F. GREEN WASHINGTON, Feb. New federal action on the steel strike was put off tonight at least past the weekend with announce- ment by a Whit.. Housi- official that President Truman will call in men from outsuli- thi- govern- ment lo discuss that and othi-r economic (iffairs next week. The announcement followed day long conferences between the president and his highest ad- visers on economics, in .Uiich the official said the "entire situation" was canvassed. "You can't divorce the- steel strike from the nation's general was the answer to a question as to whether the steel strike had been in the talks. The official said there were "no conclusive results" from today's meetings. His report followed the day's second white House visit bv Sec- retary of the Treasury Vinson and Secretary of Statr Byrnes, both former directors of war mo- bilization. Vinson and Byrnes wore in the president's office for two hours earlier in tho day. They returned late this afternoon, first Byrnes for a half hour alone with Mr. Truman during which foreign af- fairs were gone over, tru-n Vinson lo join tin-in for annther half hour on domestic affairs. Neither of the cabinet members had anything to say ns they left. The White House official could not immediately name the out- side conferees whom the presi- dent will call in next week. Between the two sessions with the cabinet officers, Mr. Truman talked a half hour with Chester Bowles, price administrator, who was called back from a South Carolina vacation for the confer- ence. Bring Down Bodies Of Four From Peak ELK MOUNTAIN. Wyo., Feb The bodies of four of the 21 victims of a United Airlines plans crash on Elk mountain were brought down by dan sled tnnioM 'about it. Looks Like Plot To Capl. Safford Of Conspiracy to Conceal Tip-Off on Jap War WASHINGTON. Feb. 2 Capt. L. F. Safford told Pearl Harbor investigators todav that there is the appearance" of a war and navy department con- spiracy to blot out receipt of a on war Japan. The naval officer, in charge intelligence in naval communi- cations in 1941, based his as.vr- tipn on what he described as the disappearance of records on mes- sages intercepted by cast, coast radio monitoring stations for the month of December. 1341. The Japanese hit the Pacific base Dec. In disagreement with nume- rous earlier witnesses. Safford insisted he had seen an inter- cepted and decoded message, three days before the attack, which included the words cast wind, rain." Those words, under a Japanese code known icre. would have advised Tokyo's pgents abroad of a break with the United States. Safford asserted that such a message was picked up by the Cheltenham, Md.. station on Dec 4, and "at least 20" officers knew dog sled tonight. The men who made the gruel- ng climb fell exhausted on the ground at the completion of the rip. Members of the party said nl he bodies had not been found. The bodies of the passengers iboard the Seattlc-to-Ncw York flane were found frozen in gro- esque positions over an nrea oi i quarter-mile rcdius by 25 men who braved 30-bolow-zcro woa- hcr and driving winds to re- over them. Picks and shovels were used to cmove the crash-victims from he snow and ice. Greater returns for nmount In- News Classified Ads. OWASSO, Okla.. Feb. high .school students will attend classes Monday in their new building, Supt. J. C. Pinkcrton announced today. The new structure replaces the building destroyed by fire a year ngo. have Since that time attended classes grade school building. students in the Hundreds of Boxes of Clothing Go Into Freight Car, Drive Chairman Appreciative More than 600 large boxes of clothing went Into a freight car Saturday. Pontotoc county's don- ation to the nationwide campaign to gather clothing for distressed peoples of the world. Martin Clark, county drive chairman, Saturday afternoon es- timated that the total of gar- Would be between and All of the clothes and shoes are in good condition, too, he re- ports. Means Comfort For Many The clothing will mean com- fort and self-respect for hun- dreds of people in Europe or Asia or elsewhere left destitute by the war. In most of the nations that were occupied by the Axis na- tions for a time, clothing supplies were taken awav by invading armies, and with little or no man- ufacture for some years, gar- ments wore out and there was little with which to replace them and, toward the last, even to patch with. Chairman Appreciates Help Clark expresses appreciation for the help of all who gave clothing or helped with the ga- thering, cleaning, repair and packaging of this county's part that takes in a lot of per- sons, he says. Leon Flowers, Albert Flowers and Cecil Jones of the Southern Ice company supervised the loading of the car. Clark extends his thanks to P-TA groups, churches, schools, 4-H clubs, Jaycees and other or- ganizations and individuals who had a part. Stores, Cleaners Aid One of the special jobs was that of the Jaycees special com- mittee headed by Jim Webb which called on merchants, clean- ers, shoe shops here. They found the men they vis- ited responsive, getting numerous garments and mer- chant donated 187 pairs of foot- ware, a shoe repair 11 pairs that had been worked over. REACHES D.C.. ASKS AID FOR PHILIPPINES WASHINGTON. Fob 2 Paul V. McNutt. high commis- sioner to the Philippines, arrived today and said there is urgent need that congress act imme- diately to provide war relief for the islands. "I seek quick action on the rs- sential legislation which must bo passed before the Philippines can get rehabilitation under way" McNutt said in a statement Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Br Bob A friend is a person who talks about th' same people you do as soon as they're out o' hearin' distance. Gather Harp says he never cared t' trace 'is family back, because w h u t you don't know won't hurt you.   

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