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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 29, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 29, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             While it is common to folk of Hie value of industries for any community, i t is actually quite os important that the people living there have a proper amount of industry to go with Hi... Urtlnrsil.iv p.irlly cloudy rain cast: puosilily mixed MIOU; colder with strung winds THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42ml 211! ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 1916 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Broadway Club HealHl i n j j Due Workers Ordered At Ear Spots Padlocked District Judge Orders Place Closed After Hearing Tuesday Morning of .'iieriff's went y club, located of Tu'--dav afternoon v.-it'i S'iri'f chain find a loci: to padl'icJ: th" place in compliance a ti; t: :rt t-uiit order that a'1 1 Tue dav morning bv T..1 Ci awfortl. Vol Crawford ail he for when the "o: atl judged that C. K. Callaway, t-.'.r.er of the place, his agent's. .vrv..nts employes be enjoin- from operating the Broadway from an-1 a.'tiv this date. that the place f.nd conducted i.-; to constitute anti should be le I'.avi- been in antl that ou-; ocra.-ums ;n tiio dance hall, fuiti-.rr fount! that club i.  tween ni" hand depart- iiin that opinion on tin- presi- elo.o d States hoped so. i-'.'-r. that his it >i-t be con- icy. It did not ily tiie tlu- atomic invited. boundaries. Ada claimed to be the leading town along (lie M. K. T. rail- road (the C. A. .1: A. was 1 then branch of the Katy) in Indian Territory in cotton market- ing (cotton has dwindled to al- most a minor crop here P 'HI' .i. I ;.V T. S. ..ii.i. that t p.< -rnteri on -ion would be f: in- sifted Ads. W EAT HER: rain ex- cl'i.iriy pan handle to- t< colder except tins afternoon; little :n tonight; ay cloudy we.-.t. mixed with r v.it.'i strong no! th- n-': m after- 1'orrc.T.t fur Jan. UD-I rb. I Oklahoma (.'nl.ier V.'etines- fi.Ilov.v.i by trend un- fuitK Jay; temperatures somewhat above no.-n-.al except T.'.-ar normal in ixtrcrr.e -.vest and ex- r.orthwe t Kansas: light V'n to snow Wednes- by little piccipita- of No Trace 01 'Winds' Message Hy JACK BELL WASHINGTON. Jan., 29, Tin- I'earl Harbor committee rc- ireived today a report that Gen. Douglas Mai-Arthur's investiga- tors could not find any evidence that the Japanese broadcast a "winds" message to signal war with the U. S. The report to the senate-house inquiry group said pertinent re- cords had been burned August 14. It addr-tl that no Japa- nese had been found who would testify that a pre-arranged sig- nal, indicating hostilities, had been radioed prior to the Decem- ber 7, attack on I'earl Har- bor. Toyko had arranged to insert tne words "east wind __ in its noon news broadcast to warn its diplomatic representatives that war with this country was at Hecords of the federal enm- cotnmisMon's moni- toring stations, also placed before the.committee, showed no inter- cent ion of such a message. However, on December'B, the rCC stations up a Toyko broad- east which contained'the words wind which under the code meant war with Great Britain. MacArthur's headquarters re- ported that its investigation sliow- that some signal may have been broadcast December 8. tok- vo time, the day of the Pearl Har- bor attack but added "exact hour unknown." nigh Had Backed Canadian Previously the Americans iiad backed Lester Pearson, Canadian ambassador in Washington, while HuEsia had been supporting Lie. In the tense dispute Russia and Iran, representatives of the two countries were expect- ed to meet today 'to seek a solu- tion of that controversy. Obstacles to the agreement or. a secretary-general mostly wc.e worked out at a five-power mcnt- ing last night in the lintil of Edward H. Stettinius, Jr., chief U. .S. delegate. Authoritative information w.is that the United States suddenly gave up its advocacy of Lost V Pearson. Canadian ambassador to Washington, and Stettinius for- mally proposed Lie as a eo npro- mise who might be acceptable to the United States, Britain and Russia. Lost First Vote The 50-y e a r-o 1 d Norwegian lawyer-diplomat was Moscow'.! candidate for president of tin- UNO, but lost to Paul-lb-nri Spaak. foreign minister of giiini in later balloting. A United States proposal to set up an 11-membcr committee to seek further contributions to LNRRA from United Nations members was adopted unani- mously by the assembly's social and humanitarian committee af- ter a table-pounding speech by Rep. Sol Bloom (D.-N.Y.) Bloom won over the votes of several Latin American countries which previously had announced they were not able to promise any further financial help to UNRKA. "Help, any kintl of Bloom said, "is needed now, not sometime in the future. There is starvation facing millions upon millions of people in the world. We have a duty to them." He said the resolution did not commit any government to def- inite help and admitted there were nations which could not be expected to contribute much. Kead Ada .Want Ads. difficulty obtaining needed sup- plies. Hits Hog Breeding The situation also may have an adverse efect on breeding of sows for fall pigs, particularly should prospects for the 1046 corn crop be average or below. Wheat supplies, the department reported, are 17 per cent smaller than a year ago. This reduction has caused the government to whittle down export allotments to Great Britain. Short supplies of corn may lead some farmers to feed wheat to livestock instead. Should this practice be carried out to any extent, export allotments to some other countries also would have to be reduced. Auto License Tags Real Bargain Now Penalty for Late Purchase Starts on Friday Those license plates for your car are cheaper now than they will be this time next week when late buyers will be paying 10 cents per day penalty "for not purchasing them before the dead- line, which is Thursday, January License plates have been on sale since Dec. 23. Several thou- sand have been sold, but there are several hundred motorists who have not purchased their tags. The 10 cents per day penalty will continue be be added to the price of the auto tags until March 1, when the price of car and truck tags will double. A. K Thornton, tag agent, has stressed the point that the penal- ty goes on this week and urges car owners to get their tags be- fore the penalty starts. Lindsay Spacing Requests Denied OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. corporation commission has denied two applications for spacing regulations in the north Lindsay oil field. Eighty-acre spacing ns request- ed by Cities Service oil company would not adequately drain each unit and would not obtain the greatest ultimate recovery of oil, the commission ruled. The commission ruled that one well on each 10-acre tract as ask- ed in a spacing application from Frank Russell, independent oper- ator, would not be economically feasible. Ropin' Pony Is Jolted in Car Collision Here Jim Snively, Rodeo Com- petitor, Driving Through Ada When Trailer Hit NEW YORK. Jan. Harry L. Hopkins, 55. former special assistant to the late Pres- ident Hoosevell. dietl at a.m., (KST) today at Memorial hospital. Hopkins entered the hospital last November. He had been in ill health for several years antl resigned his White House post last July 3, saying "1 must take a rest." A hospital attache said the na- ture of Hopkins' illness had not been determined. He had been reported in seri- ous "but not critical" condition early today. Since leaving Washington. Hopkins had been impartial chairman of New York City's cloak and suit industry. He suc- ceeded former Mayor James J. Walker to the post. His salarv Wiis reported to be about yearly. Born in Sioux City, Iowa, lie became federal relief administra- tor during the depression years of the 1030s and later became President Roosevelt's closest con- fidant. As .special assistant to the pres- ident, he attended several historic war conferences with Allied lead- ers and helped to shape policies of war and peace. Lived at White House the war he alsn Casualty Tolls Stands at 10 Dead and 43 Injured; Tornado-Like Blast Spread OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. continued today to search through the twisted wreckage of Tinker Field's main hangar, swept by a sudden fire which killed ten persons and injured 43. Cause of the blaze was being determined by an official board named by Col. Ralph O. Brownficld, deputy commander. Col. Brownfield, who estimated the loss, said the board would hear the stories of eyewitnesses and check ex-cry angle of the dis- astrous fire at the huge army air force supply depot. Not until the board reports will an official version be Available. Eyewitnesses were unanimous in telling of a "tornado-like" ex- plosion which preceded the fast- spreading fire. Dead Were Civilian Workers All of the known victims were civilian workers from Oklahoma City. The identified dead: James Mitchell Mangum, 44. Marvin A. Daum. 40. Murray W. Jackson. 33. Milton Rudolph Weber, 30. Claude Leveret Ferricr. 52. Hackett Van Cleave, 28. Claudie Lester Fleet, 37. Until several hours after the fire it was- believed none of the building's 1100 workers had per- ished. Then eight bodies were found under a crumpled wall. In- tense heat had kept workers from searching the wreckage for hours after the flames were brought under control. Two more bodies were found last night. Identification was dif- ficult and dental work and per- sonal effects were studied. Several Injured Jumping About 150 persons were at work in the immediate area when flames first appeared. A number killed were m n con- Work Now On Two Strikes Efforts Centered on Steel And GM Tieups, Hopes Grow for Early Settlement By STERLING F. GREEN WASHINGTON. Jan., 29. Efforts to halt the country's two greatest postwar na- tionwide steel tieup and the 70 day General Motors neared the showdown stage to- day here and in Detroit. .Secretary of Labor Schwellcn- bach designated James Dewey as a mediator in the GM dispute and sent him off to the motor capitol in a final government at- tcmnt to get the 175.00C CIO United Auto Workers back to their jobs. Hope meanwhile ran high for early settlement not only of that dispute but for the eight day old iron and steel shutdown which L-radually is strangling the na- tions manufacturing industry. Slay End In Week One high official of the labor lhose TULSA, Jan.' 29. _ _ The Oklahoma Dairy Products Insti- tute opens a two-day convention here today. That wasn't any ordinary pony a number of spectators watched standing around while details of a traffic accident at Main and Broadway were straightened out in mid-afternoon Monday. The owner, and driver of the automobile to which the horse's trailer was attached, was Snively of Pawhuska. And Jim Snively is a topnotch rodeo competitor who is well known as a regular money win- ner at the annual Ada Rodeo. Jim was on his way through Ada going toward Houston with his pony in the trailer when a car driven from the west on Main hit the trailer. Snively was going south on Broadway. The blow uncoupled the trailer and gave the pony a sharp jolt but apparently the talented an- imal was uninjured. After city police and the two drivers had worked out the dis- position of the case all of those involved went their way. During chairman mi.-iit board and member, of the war mobilization committee. He lived at the White House for three and a half years. Long a social worker in New York City. Hopkins was appointed to his first public office in liCll by Mr. Hoosevelt who then was New York State governor. He was named chairman of tin- state's temporary emergency re- lief administration. U'KA Head lim-38 After serving as federal relief administrator, he was WPA ad- Jim ministrator from 1035 to find served as secretary of com- merce from 1030 to 1040. In 1040. he resigned the cabinet department said he expects both disputes to be ended within the week. This would send nearly UMIO.HOO .strikers back to their jobs. Hcniamin K. Kairlcss. president of United States Steel Corpora- lion, was in Washington for con- versations with unnamed govern- ment officials, but his move- ments were not divulged At both the White House and tlie labor dep irtment cfficials gave credence to reports that a majority of top steel men now favor prompt settlement with ClO's United Steel Workers. White House May Act If an agreement is not reached between the steel disputants by midweek, it was stated, some de- finite action may be expected from the White House. Presum- ably this would be a new effort to get industry acceptance of the cent an hour increase re- commended by President Tru- man. Meantime, the government re- portedly is disposed to let the dispute ference of foremen on the sec- ond floor. Several persons injured Jumping to safety. Many were In a second floor maintenance office. The fire cut off one of two stairways but workers escaped down the other. Fire fighting crews and equip- ment from the field, Oklahoma City and Midwest City were com- bined to fight the blaze. A .dozen B29s were damaged to some extent but ed. Workers moved the Riant craft from danger with small power vehicles. INTERNATIONAL LIVE STOCK SHOW RESUMES THIS YEAR CHICAfiO. Jan. nation's largest livestock show, the International Live Stock Ex- position, will be held November 30 to December 7, 1040, after a wartime lapse of four years. Henry W. Marshall. Lafayette, Ind., president of the show, an- nounced today increased prize lists would be offered in all divi- sions this year. B. H. Hcidc. secretary mana- ger of the exposition, saitl the 26th national 4-H club congress would meet here at the same time. JOHN LADIES READY-TO-WEAR LOS ANGELES. Jan. John Roosevelt, who managed a Boston department store before before the war, has gone into the ladies' ready-to-wear business. Lee Good, district manager of chain of feminine clothing stores, announced yesterday that the youngest son of the late pres- ident has joined the organization ui an executive capacity. Chinese Nearer To Problem Solution Conferees Work Out One Worry, Another Unsettled By SPKNCER MOOSA CHUNGKING. Jan.. 20. Government concessions today solved a major problem of the politic-ill consultation (unity) conference but a subcommittee government reorganization post to lead the president's third its work without settl- tertn campaign and, in was named head of the lend-lease pro- gram. Few Words Needed For One Clause UAW-Chryslcr Agreement Uses 28 to State Com- pany's Security Side DETROIT, Jan. words were required for tin- so railed "company security" clause in the newly signed eon- tract between the CIO Automo- bile Workers anil Chrysler Cor- poration. The clause read: "The union agrees that it not oppose the discharge or cipline of anyone who instructs, leads or induces another employe to take part in any unauthorized strike." A Chrysler spokesman saitl to- day that "company .security" had not been "much of an issue at any time" in the contract negotia- tions that culminated last Satur- day in an agreement for a wage increase of Hi1- cents an hour. Saving Early Day House ing_ another major question. The concessions increased the authority of a projected reor- ganised state council. It pre- viously had been decided that the Kuomintang (national) party should have 20 council seats and other parties and non-partisans Distribution of scats in the exe- cutive Yuan, or cabinet, was the unsolved major problem. It was left for settlement by negotiation among different parties after con- clusion of the conference. A subcommittee, deadlocked on the question of distribution of national assembly seats, schedul- ed a meeting tonight to attempt a solution. At this morning's meeting, both the communist party ami the democratic league demanded a will Guarantee that the draft of the dis- I which is to be re- by a 35-man commission representing all parties and non- partisans be adopted without change by the assembly. The communists also demand- ed that they should have half the number of assembly seats hold by the Kuomintang. which now dominates that body. I.o I.ung-Chi. democratic league spokesman, pretlicted there is a chance of agreement to- night. Gouin for Strong Ties With England P A R I S. Jan. Prcsi. dent Felix Gouin told the con- stituent assembly todav he favor- ed an alliance with England "which could some day becoma part of a broad tripartite agree- ment among Russia. Great Brit- ain and France." The newly elected socialist chief of state called for a vast expanded program of nationali- zation. including electricity and gas, "certain large business banks, certain insurance and mining companies, river and can- al transportation" and part of the merchant navy. He p r o m i s e d immediately "massive reductions in civil and military expenses, salary freez- ing and measures to arrest prica increases." lie promised Severn penalties against black market operators. Gouin said his new govcrnmenl would press for "internationaliz- ation of the Ruhr" and against "reconstitution of a centralized Germany." Gouin declared for closer rela- with the United States. "We will pursue our coopera- tion with all the allied and friends; with Czechoslovakia. Belgium. Norway. Holland. Lux- embourg. Italy, the state of cen- tral Europe and the east, and South America, without forget- ting the new China who was our associate in the war just finish- the successor to President DC Gaulle said. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. AIINETT. Okla, Jan. story and a half log house, built in I8B3, has been moved into Arnett by J. E. Null to be used as an office antl museum. It was constructed by Sam Belew and was the first than a eastern Day county north of the South Cana- dian river. COURT SAYS WEEMS STILL OM'ES SUM OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. state supreme court rul- ed today that Ray O. Wccms. now corporation commissioner, still owes the state school land com- mission S2.0G7 plus interest on an old deficiency judgment growing out of a loan made him ia 1926. TH' PESSIMIST a? niniu. am't worried so much about whut th' world is comin' t' as we 're with what has already come th' world. A lot o' English ought f go back t' school an' learn the';   

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