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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 28, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             c. if it might b. idea, if a i. 9oin9 ,o Jrep in for fim. 5ome 9oyef Jjg fair afternoon anil increasing cloudiness Tucsdav. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 212 Russia In Challenge Of Iran Appeal Soys Come from Govern- ment No Longer in Power, Direct Negotiation Pouiblc By JOHN M. LONDON'. challeng d th to t vali'iitv eif 1'mli'd X.1- il after delegate t I'mi'ii v. ;i nf llitcriell- An I: Vnr.--, .-HI V... i-hi.-f I, S..M of ".i muni- I: .iruari ..ff.cn ii'- i Y. Yi: Inn tin- Sov- vice rommi- of foreign told the 1 1-memlier holrimo its major hear- on a political is.Mn- between natii us. that the Iran- ian charge; v.rie "rai-ed by a fvcrnmen? :-.r> longer in no'wrr :.nd the claims have- not Mifficient Cif-unds" fc.- action bv the se- c-iitv group. Nru- I'rrmier In Office A r.e-.v Irania- prfini-r, Ahmeil Qaviin Saltaneh. tool; over in Tehran (-urine the v.-c-ek nd. suc- ceedir.p Ibrahim Hakimi had ir.s'ructcd t h c Iranian dele- gation to raise the before th.- UNO. S. H. T.-iciiradch. cliief Iranian told the council the cii.vpute was beinu brought up bc- caj5i- i! rright lead to "intcrna- tior.al friction." Direct Negotiation i Yi.-.hir.jky asked specifically tnat the council -leave the matt- er a.-ide and open for rolutirn by negotiation's by both parties." "This would be more just and r ar.'i would he in the spirit i he declared. I _ !ie continued, wanted had with Tehran, and under the UNO charter tiir- method of direct ne- is the one which wouH fir t S-t- npplied to a dispuae. "It is ton eailv tci say tin- to the (Ir.put'e anno! to rin.; liet-.vii-n he nnrhlded. "The refuv.il to continue negotiations the Iranian side and not the Soviet side. We were continue these nego Authorities Kept Busy By Crimes Beer License Revoked, Stabbing, Fight Cases In- vestigated, Club Closing Case Tuesday There has been plenty happen ing in Ada anil Pontotoc county I along the line of crime during the past several days, but the situa- tion may be changed since Coun- tv Attorney Vol Crawford and I'ulicr Cbief Dud Lester have bi-i-ii u-orkini; almost and Hay ti vine to "bieak" other eases in connection with cases have already bi-en broken. Tin- North Pole is without n county beer license. The license that was granted several weeks ado was revoked Monday morn- in county court by JudKe Wimbisb. I'iRlit Over, ItliKiil Left Members of the sheriff's force investigated a fight at the North Pole Sunday. Hy time county officers to the place the inc was over; however, officers said that there war. blood on the floor. The fifjht was first reported to the city police, who turned the affair over to county authorities as it was outside the city limits, arrests were made. Albert Boyd, who was stabbed in a fight at the North Pole last week, has been removed from a local hospital to his home where his condition is reported im- proved. No Stab Charge Yet County Attorney Crawford said ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 1946 'Just What I FIVE CENTS THE COPY )iithday. Mrs, Amanda M. CJerhart received a d furthermore, she tool; it. The cift w-ii -m airplane ride. Above, grandson Floyd G. Frederick his grandmother after her flight nt an airport near r ville. Pa. of rial relations with all refused to urciotiate (Continued on Page 2 Column 5) Valley View Among Hospitals Okayed By ACS on 10 Points V'' nnred to Man Who Became Jap Subject In '37 Explains Act OMI Japan. Jan. An American who rc- his riti.-en-.hip and be- a Japanese subject in HI37 wr nt during -r ar.-l watched bv t.-.r b; I--J ryi uai violence-. he suf- "I f hv b; -i th r.n n: ave: and often Japanese College. 'illiain ite of br n at Merrill Color- ado Springs. Leavenv.'orth, Jan., 20, Ml_The American Collide of Surgeons todav nppioval of 40 in Oklahoma. The rut-genus list ten points on which their approval of hospitals is based: Modern physical plant; clearly defined 'carefully selected governing board: competent, well trained .'.iim-rintemlcnts: adequate and efficient personnel: organized medical staff of ethical, compe- tent physicians and nde- quatc diagnostic and therapeutic 1 facilities under competent medi- cal supervision: accurate, com- plete medical records, readily ac- essible for research and follow- i (up; regular group conferences of the administrative staff and medi- cal staff to maintain a high plane of scientific efficiency, and a humanitarian spirit the prim- ary consideration being the best care of the patient. The approved hospitals includ- ed: Ada, Valley View; Ardrnore, Hardv Sanitarium; Cartlesville, Washington County Memorial; Chuemore, Clareniore Hospital- Clinton. Indian Hospital. Western Oklahoma State Hospital, and Twenty-Five Die In Fires Over Weekend Lorge Cities and Small Places, Even Ship Anchored In Harbor Involved in Deadly Conflagrations By The Associated Press Twenty-five persons lost their lives in weekend fires throughout the nation. Kansas City had the most serious, with ten persons killed and at least 1 >ur hurt in the dead were children. an apartment house fire. Six of Tubcrculois 1 My li-.- tii: ali.-.'ttinn r :o.t people I :th." he j-aid '.'as respec- e.'iine into n an inter- tir.'.ial e that offi- as people in gen- v I always had been .i to r probablv I would have a influence upon po- o.-ies r.-ring to the Omi Hach- movement as a dt-ni- foun.led in encages brotherhood r.'.i-.n. a sioriarv v.'hich hi- ti.-.ry r.r-.ri which he :r.07. The hrothcrlK pr.ilantiiropic. religious, inelus- :-.a! architectural activities, operates it.; o-.vn hospit- al-, workshop ar.ci chapel. He resided in Japan since 1015. one 5 Prince Takamatsu, S'-cGr.a brothe-r of Kinperor Hiro- J.-to. .-ir.-l Prince Mir.asa person- t-ncouraged him during the war to continu" the OMI broth- ij.ood. lU- said Mika.va told Inm defeat of our country is ti-.-t thini; that could have provid....; the na- v.-ith 11 opportunity -or lioni imhtary "tMi (family m- :it< si that "ninety Japane. e people .ca liberated rath- Japan." 1 lonaiy taid fe-.v Am- un'-ier.-tand "why in Sam "''.yc UP American cit- "I can only sny that I found it r.< to do so to make the cinr.ocratic experiment a iuc- he explained. Attorney Tlinn Head _OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. Lcr.v.'.rd J.-.ir.es Flinn. 41. an h-re for the Southwe.-t- Bell Telephone company, died .ate vc.-te: i Rr.-.-l !h, News Want Adj. .'WEATHER! .__ ___ OKLAHOMA Generally fair aft loniqht, in- cloudiness Tuesday: lit- temperature change tonight: temperatures slight- in '.vest and north Western Oklahoma .Sanitarium: Concho, Indian Hos- pital: dishing. Masonic Hospital; hi Heno. Fcleral Reformatory Hospital; Enid. Enid General St. Mary's and University Hospi- tal Foundation: Fort Supply, .Western Oklahoma Hospital Lawton. Kiowa Indian: McAles- er. Albert Pike and St. Mary's Hospitals; Muskogce, Muskogec Central and Oklahoma Baptist- Norman. Central Oklahoma State Hospital and Eillison Infirmary: Pawnee, P a w n e c P o n c n Hospital: Ponca City, Ponca Citv Hospital; Shaw- nee. A. C. H. Hospital. Shawnee Indian Sanatorium and Shawnee Municipal Hospital; Stillwater Stillwater Municipal Hospital- Sulphur. Oklahoma State Vcttr- ans Hospital; Tahelquah, William A Hastings Indian Hospital; rahhina. Eastern Oklahoma State Tuberculosis Sanatorium and Tahhina Indian Hospital; Tulsa Hillcrest Memorial and St. John's Hospitals and Oklahoma Citv "one and Joint Hospital. McBritk- lime. Oklahoma Hospital for Crippled Children. Oklahoma City General Hospital. St. Anth- ony. University and Wesley. MilderWeale7 Today's Portion Temperature Dropped To 13 Here Early Sunday Sunday morning was really cold here, with a low of 13 de- grees officially recorded at tho Acia Greenhouse, where the gov- ernment temperature gauge is kept. Sunshine during Sunday warm- ed the atmosphere enough to br- ing the mercury to 44. then Mon- dav night it slid to a chilly Sunshine Monday began tak- ing effect early and (lie tempera- ture was moderating rapidly The Associated Press reports the federal weather bureau fore- cast for Oklahoma as promising clear skies and mild temperatures today but with clouds moving Tuesday. Reported In Cromwell in Well HE of Airport A favorable new development in Pontotoc county oil work has come up northeast of the Ada community airport with a test finding 15 foot of saturated sand in the Cromwell. There Wiis also plenty of gas. operators say. The test is the Pennington and Snyder No. 1 Busby, NW SW NW of 14-4-6. It had the Cromwell at 1 feet, drilled 15 feet of sand and has set pipe. The operators ex- pect to drill in Thursday of this week. The well also had oil and gas showings in the Senora and Cal- vin sands, The well is a 'mile and a half from the big airport. About a mile west of the Husbv well are several wells producing from the Calvin sand at about 800 feet. Farther east, about three- Snailers of a mile west of the usby well, arc two good gas wells in the Cromwell. Pennington and Snyder say that the Busby well is definitely higher than the wells to the west- ward. Nazis Planned Spy Ring at Vatican Regarded as Favorable Ground for Persons Inclined To Cooperate with Them BERLIN, Jnn., 28. h P American military government weekly. "The said to- day that secret German docu- ments had been found which showed Nazi plans to set up a spy ring at the Vatican, but it cave no indication how success- ful the scheme might have been. The paper said the documents showed that German agents und- er the guide of accredited diolo- nintic representatives and scien- tific and cultural missions w e r e ordered to spy on important visi- tors to the holy see and "sound out their feelings toward a '.Stalin-Roosevelt' alliance." The paper said Dr. Rudolph Gnauk. head of the Germany academy branch in Berlin, had been named head of tlie project, and that his papers showed the Nazis considered the Vatican an ideal spot, since the Holy See still had representatives from all countries. "It was a favorable meeting nround for persons who were in- clined to cooperate with the Axis 28 H Four died and 14 were in- jured in a hotel fire at St. Louis. In New York, three lives werr lost and one person was injured when a lower east side tenement burned. A residential fire in Harlem also took the life of a four-months old negro baby. Three men died of suffocation at Skowhegan, Me., when fire consumed the oxygen in n cabin in which they w  slightly because of heroism maintenance men who wen working on the giant aircraf when the blaze started. Braving the fire, the worker? dashed into the hangar on smal gasoline powered vehicles user to move the big planes, and tow- ed them to safety. Capt. Stan Pate, public rela- tions officer, said lip did not be- lieve any of the injuied persons were hurt critically. Many suf- fered burns. Others were bruised when they eaped from second story win- dows to escape the flame's. Twenty-five persons, some of whom were injured, were meet- ng in a sound-proof conference when the fire started. They were not aware of the until smoke started curling hrough an air vent into the By the time they left the room, ho flames had spread through he top floor of the hangar and ill were forced to leap through vindnw.1 which were about 15 eet from the ground. The blaze started on the ground floor of the hangar, a louble, connected affair. GM Dispute Entering Different Phase Now Meal Output Is Resumed Apparently All of Workers Back in Govcrnmcnt-Sciicdi Packing Plants Sees End For Steel Strike Labor-Management Picture Brightens, Officials Hope- ful of Other Solutions By NTKIIUM. V. CUIKKN WASHINGTON, Jan. labor-management picture took on its rosiest hue in weeks today as one high government of- Lookabaugh Likely To Stay at He's Getting Nice Raise, Long-Term Contract STILLWATER, Okla.. Jvn 28 P' lh.a- Oklahoma A. and M. college director of ath- letics, said today "a nice raise and long-term new contract" had been worked out for Coach Jim LookabauRh of successful Aggie football teams. Discrediting various rumors, Iba told a reporter that "Jim has not been a candidate for a foot- ball job at any other school." 'He and I have talked over the Brother of Adan Dies at Tulsa Young Noted Flier; Porcnti at Mill Creek Hardy Young, 45, of Tulsa brother of Spec Young nf Ada. CHICAGO. Jan. 28. A government spokesman said "ap- parently all" the 2411.000 meat j ficial predicted an end to the uoikers returned today to jobs crippling steel sink m government-seized meat pack- mg plants, and production under way after 12 days of strikes. A CIO Meat Workers' union representative confirmed the gov- ernment spokesman's report, add- ing things were "all quiet" on the meat packing front. Patrick J. Gorman, president of the AFL Meat Workers' union, said all his men returned to work Saturday. Hogs Into AlarkeLs Receipts of hogs at 12 leading western markets were- to- day, compared with a week ago and a year ago. A survey indicated that practi- cally all the 24H.OOO AFL and CIO meat industry workers would return to the 134 packing plants seized Saturday by the U. S. department of agriculture. Although slaughtering began today, carcasses must be "hung" 24 to 4B hours, so that deliveries in quantity to the country's butcher shops probably will riot begin before Wednesday. Ralph A. Walter, president of the Chicago Livestock exchange. aid farmers had cut their ship- ments of livestock per cent luring the strike, and oversbip- nent.s now were possible. How- said Walter. "We can handle i slight oversupplv, and we are sure wo can get farmers to hold Jack later this week if we find the market glutted." New Tie-Up in New York New York City's millions may not benefit immediately from the resumption of meat production. AFL Teamsters union local official directed 200 meat com- pany drivers not to return to vork, and said New York plants f Swift, Armour and Wilson vould be picketed if attempts vere made to move meat from he plants. The drivers are in- olved in a dispute about over- ime pay. Before urging CIO lackinghouse workers to go to vork for Undo Sam, Lowis J. Clark, union president, got Sec- etary of Agriculture Anderson's ledge to "apply immediately" for uthority to put into effect any ay raise recommended bv a fact- "within a week or so." Saying his forecast was based only partly on the trend shown in the recent Ford and Chrysler wage agreements, this ofh.-iu! a d d c d that more particularly there are signs within tho steel industry itself that settlement ad- vocates arc gaining the upper hand. Closely concerned with admin- istration labor policy but other- wise unidentifiable, "he said the industry has been divided into a "settlement bloc" and a "fight it out bloc." with the former now apparently in the ascendancy. The White House, 'he "said, probably will make no move for the "next three of four days" but after that "a lot of things mav happen." He added that govern- t Mill Creek with to bo announced will held arrangements later. Young was a flier of note and of many years experience. Be- fore the late war he flew for oil companies and during the war was on convoy flights that took his to Egypt, India and other re- gions. He is survived by his widow, a daughter and grandson and by nis parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Young: the parents still live at Mill Creek; and a sister Mrs. Frank Roberts. Young was for two years chief pilot for the Stanolind Oil and Gas company and. a veteran of hours in the air. A native of Meeker, Young learned to fly at Oklahoma Citv and Norman and for about 12 years was an instructor and com- mencal flier at Oklahoma City came to Tulsa in 1941 as a dispute. Officials of the AFL Amalga- mated Meat Cutters and Butch- ers Workmen union described their action in sending members back to work a "tem- porary truce" which would last "at least until we know that the fact-finding commission will rec- ommend." The fact-finders, who conduct- ed hearings in Chicago last week, have returned to Washington, and Dr. Edwin E. White, board chair- man, said a conclusion could be reached in the "shortest possible time." The CIO union has offered to accept an increase of 17 cents an hour, and the AFL now is holding out for 15 cents. He and situation here." Iba added, we have worked out the details for a nice raise and long-term new contract. "He has told me he has never sought, in any way, another post. pilot for the British-American Oil company. He was a charter member of .he Quiet Birdmcn, Oklahoma hangar. KANSAS CITY. Jan. A tragic story of honor and frus- trated escapes was told today by survivors of an early mominj' rly momin' lire which turned an old apni-t- inent building here into a raging furnace and snuffed out the lives of ten six of them chil- dren. 1-our others were FARMER HOPES HIS NEXT ACCIDENT IS DIFFERENT OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. S. Barker, 36, a Caddo county farmer, now re- covering in University hospital from a fractured right shoulder, hopes his next accident will be different. Last May, his wagon was struck by an automobile and he suffered a fractured right shoul- der. Two weeks ago. the highway patrol reported, he fell off the same wagon and broke the same shoulder again. Greater returns for amount in- mjurcd. News Classified Ads. College Enrollment Soaring In State, Led by Veterans of War (Continued on Page 2 Column 5) Quif Counting Jews Arriving at One Concentration Camp By NOI.AND NOUGAARD NUKHNHKHU. Jan.. 211. Jews marked for extermination at the Oswiccini (Auschwitz) concentration camp arrived in such numbers that German guards did not even trouble to count the thousands whom they sorted out on the railroad plat- forms and marched directly to the gas chambers, the internation- al military tribunal was told to dav. Mine. Marie Claude Vaillant- Cotituner. slender French widow, communist mem- ber of France's constituent as- sembly, told the war crimes court in graphic detail of her two and a half years in Nazi concentra- tion camps, an account which held even the spellbound. Alive Into Furnace One night." she testified, "we were awakened by horrible cries. The next morning we learned from men working in the gas chamber that they had run out of gas and had hurled children alive into the furnaces." From the cell block where she was housed, she said, she could watch the trains arriving at Auschwitz station. "When a convoy of Jewish women arrived, older women, mothers and those who were weak or sick were sorted out and taken immediately to bo cassed. she testified. Used In Experiments "Women 20 to 30 years olt ,cr? to expcrimenta blocks, she continued, explain mg that in those buildings Naz doctors toyed with experiment intended to devise a swift, sun means of sterilization. On some occasions a neatly nt :ired women's orchestra would gav selections from "tht Merry Widow" or "the Barcarole' on the railway platform as tin trams arrived, the witness said. None of the damning dcscrip ions of Nazi atrocities submitted to the court in the past produc- ed the atmosphere of strained at tcntion pervading the room a? the woman, her hands tighth clasped, told her story of Oswic- cini where the daily death rate allededlv averaged from 250 to 350 dailv. NLRB Hearing Is Started Big Auto Company Facts Charges of Failing To Bargain in Good Faith DETROIT, Jan. CIO United Auto Workers, their new wage increases from the Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. safely arranged, today plunged into a new phase of their battle with General Motors 33 a national labor relations board hearing against the corporation began. General Motors, only of the automotive industry's Biij Tnrec with which the un.'on reached no wage Jes- pite a 09 dav t'.v.iu-. facer NLflli charges ot failing to bargain in pood faith T.ic- hwrins Mill ba conducted by trial Ger- ald K. HciHy. Preparing to take the stand early as an NLRB witness was UAW vice-president Walter Reu- ther, who yesterday told GM it "must pay a higher wage increase than either Ford or Chrvsler" to "compensate" its striking em- ployes. Will Ask Higher Raise saying. Low temperatures over the state are- expected to range from M to decrees overnight. High readings in the state Sun- day was 53 at Guymon, and Ponca City had the overnight low of 20. OKLAHOMA CITY'. Jan. Assistant Fire Chief J. Amberg is a versatile fellow. Answering an emergency call he found a horse had falle'n into an abandoned oil well slu-sh pit. In the most approved wild west manner Amberg lassoed the ani- mal and with the aid of another horse pulled him to safety. VANITA, 28, Martin Toenor, 33-year-old Vinita resident, was struck and killed in the outskirts of Vinita. Read the Ada News Want Ads. n> AuocUtfd Tri-ii Knrollment soared in Oklahoma colleges and universities today in a back-to-the-campus parade" led by the state's war veterans Seventeen state schools of higher learning reported a second semester enrolment above 22 750 men who served in the armed forces in World War Two. Four universities Oklahoma City. Tulsa. Phillips at ported definite signs of recovery from the wartime dearth of stu- dents. Some enrolments doubled figures for the first semester of the 1945-flfi term. O. V. Crowded Oklahoma University had 5.413 students ready for classwork and the registrar said at least 400 more would sign up in time for the new semester. This compares in January of saw registration spurt far above pre-Pearl Harbor days. The uni- versity of Oklahoma and Okla- homa A. and M. college were but a few hundred students below HHO. Although some state colleges still have only about half their Dr. George L. Cross. O. U. pres- ident, forecast veterans would be among the university's postwar population and 2.400 of these already have enroled. Forty- five per cent of them arc mar- ried. New students won't enrol until Tuesday at Oklahoma A. and M. College but the registrar said the .Stillwater school was assured of at least fi.OOO students. Two thou- sand veterans, half of them mar- ried, are registering. A. and M. had 5.058 students in January of 1940 and is anticipat- ing next autumn. OCU on Build Oklahoma City university will have more than 2.000 students for its second tho number last fall. This includes those in its downtown school. Seven hundred per cent of them part of the student body. OCU. the state's Methodist .school, had 983 students in Janu- (Continued on Page 3 Column 3) Mrs. Roy E. Rumage Is Taken by Deafh Wife of Ada Business Man Succumbs After Operation Mrs. Roy E. Rumage. 56, died at a local hospital Sunday at 3-30 a.m.. following an operation. Funeral services wcro hold Monday afternoon from the First Methodist church, with burial in Memorial Park. Special attend- ants during the services were members of the Wesley Friend- ship class, the Helen Webb Cir- cle and the Tanti Study Club. Mr. Rumagc operates" tho Hum- age Battery and Electric com- pany in Ada and has been in bus- iness here for a number of years Surviving are Mr. Rumage- two daughters. Mrs. LeJeanno French Mclntyre, Oklahoma City, and Mrs. Mildred DeVenev Texas City, Tex.; a son. Harofd H. Rumage of Denver City, Tex four brothers, Charles C. Lane of Ada. Dennis C. Lane of Prague Dr. Wilson H. Lane of Oklahoma City and Robert C. Lane of Nor- man. Wage increase settlements fop an 18-ccnt hourly boost from Ford and an 18'- cent raise from Chrysler were announced within three hours Saturday afternoon by the union and the two com- panies. The UAW originally de- manded n 30 per cent incrr.ifr, but scaled down dcninmls twira in the course of negotiations. Reuther. who led the UAW team in General Motors negotia- tions, sot no specific figure to re- present the current demand on GM. but insisted it v.culd be tnt highest wage settlement with anv of the Big Three be-.auso "the corporation's rejection uf ti-.a fact-finding conmuttcii'a recom- mendation is responsible for pro- longing the strike and ha.5 f jrccd increased hardships upon Centr- al Motors workers." The union at one time agreed to accept tho committee's com- mittee's compromise proposal for a 19 u cent increase, but with- drew the olfer a week ago when no similar acceptance was forth- coming from the corporation. CM Offer Is 13! 3 Cents Wage boosts won at Ford and Chrysler resulted, Reuther as- serted from "the determined stand of the General Motors strikers supported by the solid- arity of x x x x other workers." GM officials, who declined comment on yesterday's UAW statement, offered a 13'7 cent liourly increase before the fact- finding board's report, and havo declared several times that offer "still stands." Another UAW plan to curtail General Motors production was sut into action today as workers n 150 tool-and-die "shops in the Detroit area stopped work on GM parts. The strategy had been an- nounced previously by union of- ficials. (ALL NO. 22 ABOUT CLOTHING Get Name on List Now, Bundles Will Be Called For On Coming Thursday Martin Clark, county chairman of the Old Clothes drive, today announces plans for the clean-up of collection in Ada. A number of citizens failed to get their bundles of clothing out in time for the Saturday morn- ing collection and have called about them. No. 22 between now and Thursday and on Thursday of this week aulos will scurry about over the city and pick up the bundles yet to be turned in. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. TH' PESSIMIST 7 Bah ILI. Jt. Your opinion is as good as th' next feller's, but that ain t much fer it. Learn as if you wuz goin' live as if you wuz goin1 f drive your "car on th' highways fmorrow.   

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