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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 27, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 27, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             As Fsbruory, often ,h, w.rst weather month .f th. a person is inc.in.J f.el ,h., rathe, H..n Kav. bad March, IH-. ju.t ,h. cold in February and 9e, it ore, WEATIIKR Fair anil uarmrr Sunday anil .Miimlav. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS Few Marines Handle Huge Task _ 42nd 211 Three Crack Cross Nation Mark One Jct-Propcllcd Plane Streaks Across in 4 Hours, 13 Minutes, 26 Seconds NEW YORK. Jan. Tr.f transcontinental (light rtc- v.-as today by three t-. S. jet-pi oprllcd planes, I'liM-'n rtreaked from Long Beach. Calif., to La Guardia field at -S'.'eeds approaching that of sound. All three planes were Lock- heed P-KO pursuit ships. The one r il-.tcd hv Col. William II. Coun- i :n. flight test official from Field, flew non-stop rovcri-d the 2.470-mile dis- t.'.nci- in four hour.--. 13 minutes 2ti miles an hour. T-.vo others stopped at To- pok.i. Kar., for refueling. previous transcontinental flight record. 2.4G4 miles from Calif., to Floyd Bennett Brooklyn, in five hours and 27 minute-.', v.-as established last Dec-. 11 with a Hoeing bc.'niM-.-. Othrrs Crnrknl Rrrnrtl Even the t-.vo pilots who stop- ped for fuel at Topcka today beat the old r.-cor.l by comfortable rr.r.rgjns. Capt. Martin C. Smith Kidder, Mo., another army test pilot from Wright Field, cov- the distance in four hours c3 minutes and seconds, and John S. Babel, a fighter pilot of the 412th jet-propelled fighter group at March Field, Calif., made it in four .-.ours. 23 minutes and 54 seconds. Babel, who stopped four min- ttes at Topcka. made an average of 56! miles an hour. Smith slopped fix minutes at Topeka averaged miles an hour. Lane Klichts Problem Solved Most of the time the planes flew at altitudes of to 41 000 feet. Col. Count-ill's non-stop flight V.T.S ce.n.-ide-ied in some quar- ters ;.s a MSII that the problem c.f long flights in the jct-propcll- passed unanimously at" a maV mec'tfng'rf lern of fueling jet planes for a farmers here today. .r.g flight was reported far from We are tired of trying to pro- duce the food the world needs with worn-out Park- er Woodall, Vcrden. declared in urging adoption of the resolution. "If the people involved in these strikes were hurting only them- selves I'd say go ahe'ad and let i uiunii DIIU niiiiiir-ii '1Rht but are not j VIVITII QIIU IWUUCU they're hurting everybody else ADA, OKLAHOMA. SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Angry Grady County Can Prove It, Farmers in Protest Iran Claims Urge Nation's Food Producers to Withhold Foodstuffs From Market Until Labor, Management Go-Back to Work By FRANCIS E. HARDEN CHICKASHA, Jan. resolution urging the MfllHiii's growers to withhold all foodstuffs from market "un- til labor and management get plenty hungry and go back to 300 5-oluticn. Col. Count-ill's plane wav c-qiiippcd with fuel l.'.r.ris. The others had regular Fred P. Morrison Dies in California UNO Delegation Tells Council Can Show Red Interference in Affairs By JOHN A. PAKRIS LONDON. Jan. Iran's delegation to the United Nations asserted in a new note to the security council tonight that Soviet interference in Iran's affairs can bo fully proved.'' CIO-UAW Union Settles Its Wage Disputes With Ford, Cnrysler For Boost In Pay Workers to Get 18 Schwellenbach Is Hopeful Sees Ford, Chrysler Settle- ments Significant, Indicat- ing Break in Deadlock WASHINGTON. Jan. 26 Cents an Hour Raise No Comment Yet from GM Officials; Both Agreements Yet to Be Submitted to Workers for Ratification DETROIT, Jan. CIO United Automobile Workers union settled its-wage disputes today with the Ford Meat Workers Back to Jobs CIO Leaders Urge Men To Return, But Haven't Called Off Strike Yet wage settlements to- night as representing "a highly significant trend." Optimism over prospects of a in the long labor-man- agement deadlock was equally qualified in other government of- 'ices. This view was tempered only slightly by the assertions of CIO Jnited Automobile Workers 01 "icials that they would not accep he 18-cent hourly wage increas ngrecd on in Ford plants as th jasis for ending the two-months old General Motors strike. Makes Formal Statement Schwellenbach's opinion wa ixprcsscd in a formal statement "The settlement of wage con rovcrsics between the Ford Mot T company and the Chrysle Jorporation and the United Aut Vorkers-CIO represents a highl> ignificant trend. "The companies and the union re to be commended in these cttlements, which were arrivee t through genuine collective Bargaining between the parties. "This and the conclusion of thc lass strike last Monday and thi it. Louis trucking strike last Fri ay plus a vote to return to work MotT, and Plvyslcr Corp- at demanded .50 per cent increase. Ardmore Safe Is Found Near Ada Blown and Robbed East Central Graduate, Former Fittstown Post- master, Had Been in Navy __ F.-ecJ P. Morrison. 32. died evening at o'clock hospital at Long California. He will be in the Naval Memorial cemetery. Angeles. Tuesday. Tr.e son nf Mr. Mrs. R. M. Killidale he- was crad-ja'.ed from East Central college in lid-} and has in Por.totor. Coal a n d ciuntic.'. During the e..! he was pn.-tmastrr at Fi'.'.s'.n-.vn and before enlisting in r.avv in 1942, was 'mploycd :r. :'--.e n.v5! office in Tulsa. that caused his ctntr. developed while he was in r.avy. nnd v.-as treated in r.ava! hospitals after his di.5- Brfidcs his parents ho is sur- vived by hi? wife. Floreta: a s.ir.. Jimrry: and a sister. Mrs. L. C. Reid. Wichita Falls. Texas. He was a r.cphc-w of W. B. and Ben of Ada. j Rr.TrRNiNc; TO PLACES ON PATKOL OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. 2B._ General Hanciell t. CCOD held today that Safety C J. M. Gentry must war veterans to their patrol jobs even though rr.e-.-ir.s cii.-t-hargc of troopers v have been with the patrol :t was nrgam.-i-d. In ;.n opinion interpreting an o.' the Cobb tmoper.s retuimng ar.-i.fti service must be re- even though other pa- ir hr.cn bo discharged to the- patiol within lnr.it of troopers. IOR TODAY AT (IIIAKY Joi-.n Th'imas I.evi. athletic at Ha.-krll Instituif, be h" Id here l.r-.l war, slabbed to i ccatr. Turtdav in Denver. Services v.-ill lie conducted in i Members of the sheriff's force found a safe that was stolen from the Grocery in Ard- more Friday night. The safe was i (i'sc-ove-red near the Canadian i river north of Ada and near State Highway Authorities said that the door had been blown from the apparently before it was aban- doned in a ditch on a country load about 300 yards from the highway. The safe was about a 400 pound size. It was found about 10 a.m. Saturday bv a farmer who notified the" sheriff's office! Ardmore authorities said Sat- urday morning that the safe con- tained in cash in addition to several thousand dollars worth of bonds. Lowery Denies Body Was Cold aljairs can bo fully proved." ay plus a vote to return to work The new note, dated Jan. 26, of the two unions in the packini was disclosed shortly after Pre- industry pending a fact-findinr 1 TAIU.EQUAH. Okla., Jan.. 2fi. J. I.owcry, .suspended Indian agent charged with mur- der in connection with thc fatal shooting of Juimita liutli r, Cher- ol-.t-f Indian agency clerk, today denied through his attorneys a report that the woman's body was cold when lie brought it "to a hospital here. In a newspaper interview, at which Lowery and his attorneys were present, the latter branded as "misleading and erroneous" published n ports concerning condition of the body at the time it arrived at W. W. Hastings Memorial hospital. President Jumped Job His Raleigh. N. C.. employer ol'eml a S10 rowanl for thc cap- ture of Tailor's Apprentice An- drew Johnson, win. later became picsulcnt of the United along with themselves and it's time something was done about it. Heat on Congressmen In another resolution presented by Walter Noakes, Amber, the farmers agreed to withhold votes from "any of the congressmen now holding office" unless they act at once to force "labor anil management to live up to their written contracts." Noakes asserted in offering thc vote resolution that the unions and industrial leaders had agreed "to arbitrate peacefully" all dis- putes and to seek to reach agree- ments on wages and other differ- ences around a council table. Instead, he asserted, widespread strikes have resulted from a "fail- ure to live up to these agreements and it's time congress acted to force both sides to adhere to them." Will Withhold Food The food resolution declared in I part: i "We the independent, patriotic farmers of Grady county hereby resolve and agree to withhold our I products from market until the strikes of labor and management are settled. I "And, at the same time, we call I on all farmers of thc natiton to do likewise. "We further resolve to continue producing as we did micr Ahmed Qavames Saltaneh, a long-time friend of Russia, was .'elected new premier of Iran. Ahmed Qavan announced he would seek direct negotiations with Russia on the dispute with the Soviet Union, giving rise to r-peculation that his government might withdraw or defer action on the complaint put before thc security council. The new 2.000-word note, it was understood, was delivered to the council by the Iranian dele- gation on its own initiative, in it ply to a Russian letter yester- day. The Soviet letter opposed scr.urity council consideration of Iian's complaint, on grounds that the Soviet position in Iran was legal and justifiable under Soviet Iranian treaty, and favored di- rect negotiation of the dispute by Russia and Iran. _ An Iranian spokesman said his celegation had not yet received any new instructions from Teh- ran, but it was reported such in- structions might be sent, possibly over the weekend. The security report is one of the most import ant occurrences since the close o the war. "In existing disputes in other major industries the American public will be served best through recognition by-both the compan- ies and the unions that speedy reconversion depends upon early settlement of their controversies Full employment can be achieved only in this manner." Want More From GM President It. J. Thomas of the CIO-UAW. shortly before his de- parture by plane for Detroit, said "General Motors: settlement will have to be higher" than Ford's. He said GM's current rates are lower than the Ford scale. Vice President Walter heuther director of CIO-UAW's General Motors division, told reporters "we'll not settle with GM for less than 19 cents." This is the figure recommended by the presidential fact-finding board in the GM dispute. Union sources, before an- nouncement of the 18 cent n n. v, iiic security rn t council is slated to discuss the settlement had prcdict- Iranian, Greek, and Indonesian questions Monday. Northern Iran is occupied by Soviet troops, and Tehran charg- es that Russians prevented thc movement of Iranian troops into Azerbaijan to deal with the up. rising there. during the war without strikes__ but to hold it until labor and management get plenty hungry and go back to work." In the vote resolution the farm- ers asserted: "Our nation is torn by strikes and lockouts and management and labor cannot or will not gel together and make settlement of erences and our congress d to take the necessary steps to protect the innocent pub- lic and we think the time has States. (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) Baptist t-hurch at p. i r.-. L-v; v.-as June N, I Money From March of Dimes Has Been Spent for Victims Of Polio in Pontotoc County e-; B.-nti.n Sharp uf injuries ie- v struck C.  w thc m one y col- lected last year has been spent. ins (.-nice. SfiO.JM) has been spent for and ap- Hatchings: Hilhc K. Miller received worth of treatment. Sl-I.GO has been spent for ecminment to treat Freda Smith and S12 was spent for Jimmy Anderson. Charles F. Byrd received treat- ment plus some needed equip- ment that amounted to SHOO; was spent chair for Vcrni was spent in the Freddie 'Tray lor case. Some will be spent in the Dr. Granger Heads Stale Jerseymen STILLWATER, Okla.. Jan.. 26, four dairy bre- eders' associations elected offic- ers today at the close of the tenth annual Dairy Day program at Oklahoma A. M. college. New officers: Guernsev breeders: E. K. Gay- lord. Oklahoma City, president; Tharcs Enfile. Enid, vice-presi- dent, and Ballard Bennett. Okla- homa City, secretary-treasurer. Ayrshire breeders: Glen Sch- neider. Purcell, president: Jack Nelson, Carrier, vice-president: J. W. Boehr, Stillwater, secretary- treasurer. Holstein breeders: ,1. n. Ste- ward, Junes, president: H. W. Cave, Stillwater, first vice-presi- dent; Hoy W. Wood, Verden sec- ond vice president: W. K. Cun- ningham, Fail-view, third vice- president; Roscoe Scevers. Tulsa, fourth vice president, and E. H. Houston, Oklahoma City, secre- tary-treasurer. Jersey cattle club: Ed Granger. Ada, president: C. B. Shcrrill. Watonga. vice-president; H. W. Cave. Stillwater, sccrctary-trea- basis. other work money spent for ses in Pontotoc. Drive chairman feel that dona- tions should increase during the remaining few days of the drive which ends Thursday. High School Girls Help I That Mile of Dimes booth downtown is being operated by members of the Ada High schoo'l service club and pep squad. for a wbeei bc a.member of the organ- Casey Sins a niust attend- Trav- i cd a11 Miss (Continued on Page 2 Column 1) ver.sity extension dairy snechlist speak on the subject of improv'e- mcnt of herds through artificial insemination 16-Peakeil Range The Cascade Mountain range, limning through Washington and Oregon from the Canadian bor- der to California, has IG major snow- or glacier-clad peaks. Eighty varieties of trees grow on White House grounds. In Ada one variety repair Sinnett-McadeJs'. 1-27-lt MacArthur, Krueger Observe Birthdays MocArthur, 66, Pins Award On Krueger, 65, Retiring Sixth Army Head TOKYO. Jan. al MacArthur celebrated his Gtith birthday today by decorating a comrade-in-arms for more than 40 Walter Krueger. retiring commander of thc famed U. S. Sixth Army. It was a double-barreled cele- bration, because it also was the birthday for Krueger. who led MacArthur's spearheads all the way from the South Pacific through the Philippines. Appearing as vigorous and alert as he was when he came ;iut of thc Philippines in thc black days of 1942. MacArthur rjmncd the Distinguished Service Cross and an Oak Leaf cluster on Kruege'r. "Nit army in military history ver bad a greater leader than General MacArthur said "and no army ever had a iccord of accomplishment greater than -that of the Sixth Army." Today the Sixth Army was formally inactivated. All its high-point veterans already are home, its low-pointers have been transferred to the U. S. Eighth army of occupation, and Krueger himself will sail soon aboard the battleship New Jersey for home and retirement. The Kighth Army also is strip- ping its ranks of veterans. More than n.nno officers and enlisted men will sail from Yokohama Sunday and Monday. "Stuffing Bread" A bakery in Lorain, Ohio, makes "stuffing which contains sage, thyme, marjoram, salt and pepper, and is for use in making dressing for fowl. At elevations about 10.000 feet over the United States, winds blow from the west 85 per cent 01 time. "BKKAKS" COMK IN By thc Associated Press ,e approximately one hour and 15 minutes yesterday (bat.) these rapid-fire developments occurred on the nation's labor front: m', (EST) Packinghouse Workers urged 193.000 members to return to work Monday. At p. m. Ford Motor Co. and CIO United Automobile Workers settled their wage dispute on the basis of an 18 cents an hour pny increase. At p. m. major railroads and 18 of 20 railroad unions agreed to arbitrate wage requests for or 85 per cent of railroad employes. Then, two hours and 13 minutes later, at p. m the Chrysler Corp. and CIO-UAW reached "complete agreement" on wages with workers getting an 18J cents pay boost Close on the heels of an agreement between Ford and the :iO providing for an 18 cents an hour (15-1 per cent) increase, Chrysler and the union announced their dispute had been settled on the basis of an 18J cents an hour (16.2 per cent) increase. O. Jan. .-Pi- today gave promise that ii labor force of 2-111.000 AFL and CIO workers on strike in the meat packing industry simv Jan. would be back on the job Mon- day, working for L'nclir Sam. Twelve hours after the govern- ment took possession of strike- bound- plant-: the CTO-United Packinghouse Workers ?i n i o n leadership urged its 193.0CO mem- bers to return to work Monday, reversing its decision yesterday not to go back. However, the CIO did not call off its strike but ordered pickets withdrawn at S p.m. today. AFL Planned to Return Prior to thc seizure thc AFL- Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen's union direct- ed its striking members tn go to work for thc government (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Yalta Deal Allowed Russians To Move Into Kurile Islands Part of Railroad Unions, Roads In Arbifralion Pact CHICAGO, Jan.. 20, icials of la rail unions rep- resenting workers and he nation's major railroads agrc- d today to submit union wage de- mands to arbitration. In Cleveland, however, F. Vhitney. president of the Broth- rhood of Railroad Trainmen, one >f two unions which walked out f thc conferences here, said the grcemcnt would not altar his inion's plan to conduct a strike Whitney and Al Vanley Johns- fin, president of the Brotherhood f Locomotive Engineers, left ie hearing, both asserting that ie mediation board's proposal Russians Moving in Troops And Families; Permanent- Fate Nor Decided WASHINGTON. Jan. Secretary of State Dean Acheson said at his news con- ference this week that agreement had been reached at the Yalta meeting of the Big Three for Soviet occupation of the Kurile Islands. Even earlier government of- ficials told the Associated Press that thc Russians were moving and their families "bag returned or were n-ady to return. Management of the seized pro- perties pledged cooperation to Gayle G. Armstrong, government representative of President Tru- man and Secretary of Agriculture Anderson. After the CIO action Arm- strong said: "With the cooperation of both labor and management now assured, we can get meat back into the markets within a matter at days." fan Restore Operation Rapidly He met with Lewis J. Clark, president of the CIO union, and executive committeemcn. discuss- ing operational plans, and plan- ned a later meeting with Patrick E. Gorman, secretary-treasurer of the AFL union. A spokesman for Armstrong said livestock could be started into packing plants over week-end and "by Monday we should have n good volume of operation, but not nearly 100 per no i working rules. "They undertook to ignore our ociucst on rules changes and the ailroads did thc same." Whitney lid. The brotherhood chcif said rike ballots had been mailed to >me 215.000 brakemen. flagmen, ming car stewards, yard mas- ers, switch tenders and "about vo-thirds of the conductors" eprcsentcd by his union. He stimated three weeks would be quired to complete the ballot- ng. The engineers have arranged to meet next month to consider taking a strike vote. BARTLESVILLE NEWSPAPER MEN IN CONGRESS RACE BARTLESVILLE. Okla., Jan. 2B. Bartlesville news- papermen arc seeking the con- gressional nomination from thc first Oklahoma district but on different tickets. Ted Adams today formally an- nounced his candidacy on the Drmocratic ticket. stretch fanwisc across thc Ok- hotsk Sea. There has. however, been no indication from American offi- cials that agreement was reach- ed at Yalta for permanent pos- sessions by Russia of the Kurilcs, which the Japanese used as a springboard early in the war for f ocpation. elf would give the Soviet government ful "first stake" claim a power- for their of whether a definite commitment was made at Yalta. This would be obvious under the assurance Acheson has giv- en that the United States will re- tain the bases it needs in the Pacific even in event of a-veto within the United Nations secur- ity council of an American re- quest for establishment of sole trusteeship over so-called secur- ity islands. As he explained it. with such a veto, control of those specific Wind, Cold Due To Slart Diminishing Temperature Here Dropped From 73 Friday Afternoon To 26 Over Night By now people of this part of the state have a good idea of what the latest cold spell amount- cd to. It all started Friday night. Fri- day had been delightfully warm. with 73-dcgrco weather. the wind switched to thc Then north and turned cold and colder, with a minimum for the night of 26 degrees. Saturday was partly cloudv, then sunny, but the mercury stay- ed right around where it started the day. and early Saturday night was unofficially reported be at 26 dqgrccar- The Associated Press stated Saturday that today is expected to be slightly warmer after a night in which temperatures wcra due to slide down near zero in parts of the state. The strong .bases would remain in status I northerly .winds are also quo; that is under United States !cd lo diminish, by virtue of conquest and occu- pation. Lengthy Cham The OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan., General Randell S. Cobb today announced thc res- ignation of S. H. King, assistant shicksboeks attorney general, who will enter oViebp' private practice at Pauls Val- ley. Read the Ada News Want Ads Hundreds of Garments Brought In Saturday as Ada Residents Give to War-Destitute People Ada people put the Old Clothes I drive over in a big way Satur- day with their denoations of clo- thing that will go to relieve the suffering of destitute peoples of war-devastated lands. Already many bundles had come to the schools, and Satur- day group of citizens and Boys to what has a citywide collec- Scouts made tion here. The result was that auto-load after auto-load of clothing was unloaded at the Shannon store on East Main during thc day. There a crew of men worked busily sorting and packing the garments and at the end of the day estimated that the total might JTUS w high u two or three tons been assembled elsewhere. Suits, overcoats, some fur coats, hundreds nnd hundreds of other garments came into view as bundles were unrolled. Comfort against winter's cold will be assured for many a pov- erty-stricken family, bereft of belongings and with what cloth- ing it had worn through thc years when war prevented replacements of clothing. The Old Clothing campaign ends January 31. which is next Thursday, and Martin Clark, county chairman, and other lead- ers, urge citizens who have not yet had a part in it to be sure that they get their donations of clothing in early thu week. mountain s-vstom starts ;it Gulf of Mex- Statos' away in the Gaspe Peninsula, Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. TH' PESSIMIST Ther' ain't nothin' that be- trays th' character o' folks more than whut they find f laugh at. Many a feller goes an never catches 'til he gits back   

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