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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 25, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 25, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Police Face Blank Wall-headline in neighboring paper on cops failing to trace hijackers; well, they're just where a pupil used to find himself when he foiled to bring up his school work'. Cold wave Saturday and central and north tonight; cloudy tonight and Saturday THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1916 Del Zenfo 1st Starts Trip To New Home Jock Smith Goes Along To See That Famous Young Bull Reaches Canada Safely DC! Z.-r.V. 1st. S.11.000 bull pur- hy George Kodenz of Tor- onto. Canada. oin the- W. A.   it? ev.r.or r.ot This lilllr C'liinrsr feller has a imt-miirh hinder sis- Irr. liy war ami left destitute, he and she need other with spare clotli- inc fur the cirl and Mimrthini; more suilalilr than that mislittiiiR ohU-coat fur her In other. inure of innocent men. women anil c-hildrenare in tragic need in war- devastated lands aliruad. You can he their friend hy contributing serviceahle used clothing. and hcdding to the I'liitcd Na- tional Clothing Collection. Grady County Group Peeved Coll on Governor, Commis- sion, Demand Long-Prom- ised Work on Highway 19 OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan.. 25, embattled Grady county delegation, numbering about 200, called on Gov. Robert S. Kerr anel the state highway commis- sion todav to ask for hard-surfac- ing of state- highway work they elcclareel lias been si'Kje the Murray administration. The delegation grew so rapidly that the meeting was first trans- ferred from the capital's blue loom to the criminal court of appeals chamber, then finally to the big house of representatives chamber. Bert Barefoot, Chickasha. juelge of the criminal court appeals, declared highway from Chick- i asha to Lindsay is in such bad i condition that it is impassable in nted'to'pu! chase the bull ct wt'ath( ;'ntl almost unusable in drv weather to purchase avai'able. Lookabaugh Still Coaching at A M Offered U. of Florido Job, Soys No Deal in Making Right Now STILLWATF.R. Okla.. Jan.. 25. Lookabaudi. head foot- coach at Oklahoma A. M. c-Dllrce. said todav hf had been "nffereci" the roari-.ing prst at tin- L of Kloi ida but had r.ot decided to accept. Lnokabaugh saiti "they've con- tacted but there's no deal in t.-.e making right now." Homer Community Finishes Drive Donates Clothing, Cleans, Meiyli, Packages 200 Pounds of Wearables Hnmer nmmunity has collect- cJe.-.r.cd. mended anil packed pounds of clothing for desti- ;jlT as peoples. j The women's club and sch'ol cooperated in the col- which brought in underwear I r.ri i Ii rags suitable for ui.pl Mail often drxs not reach small town on the mute, :chool buses and commercial buses frequently are unable to run. ancl f.irni pro- duce sometimes spoils because1 of delayed transportation. Ban foot asserted. The mad is the only thoroughfare to serve :i large farming and oil producing area, since a railroad which served th-.- area has been discontinued, he pointed out. Fred Brookshirc. Chickasha. saitl in response to a euiestion by i Kerr that the road work had I been promised bv highway cnm- mis.-ions in the Murray and Phil- lips administrations but w a s j never carried out. He added that present highway Ccmmissinner Ben T. Childers I .-.ml Highway Engineer H. E. Ba- j iley. had promised that it would j "among the first roads built i the war." but the work was1 omitted from both the IIMtj and: road programs recently an- nounced by the commission. The delegation included iepre-1 sentatives from Chickasha. ley, Alex. IJush Springs and Tut tie. Indian Agent Denies Charge Accused of Murder In Shooting of Young Indian Woman Employed As Secretary TAHLEQUAH, Okla., Jan. 25. Vance J. Leiwrey. a 40- ye-ar-old Indian agent of "splen- did prepared bis de- fenses today against a charge that he murdered a dark and de- mure Cherokee girl employed as his secretary. Lowcry, accused in the Wed- nesday night shooting of Jua- ivta Butle-r. 27. engaged W. W. Miller and Wesley Miller, a Tah- Icqtiah fathcr-and-son law firm, to represent him at a prelimin- ary hearing February 26. He had steadfastly maintained that the girl shot herself accidentally with a pistol he saiel she took fiom the glove compartment of his automobile. IStith Reputations Cieiod County Attorney Houston B. Techee saiel berth Lowcry anel Miss Butler had "splendid" repu- tations in the community. Lowcry. who has a wife and three children, was transferred In re last March from Chickasha, Okla. Ho was free today under bond following his pica of innocent at an appearance before Peace Justice R. W. Walker. The county attorney said he found five bullet holes in Low- cry's automobile, one through each side, two through the top. Miss Butler was shot once through the chest. Shot Through Chest Dr. John C. Hupp, of the In- elian hospital here, said that the bullet which killed Miss Butler entered her chest from the left side and ranged through it to the right. County Attorney Teehee said investigation showed the girl was righthandcd. Lowerv and Miss Butler had b e e n to Sallisaw on agency business and were return- ing here bv way of Stilwell. Miss Butler, 27. was a graeluate of Haskell Institute at Lawrence, Kas., and was described by fel- low workers as being a capable clerk and having "unusual com- mon si use." She- weighed about !'5 pounds and was about five fee-t and two inches tall. Gel lundieTdT Clothing Out In Time for Scouts Carl .Magce Seriously 111 OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. Magee. pioneer south- western editor and inventor of the pin-king meter, is seriously :Ii at a ho.-pital here. Magce. formerlv editor of the Oklahoma Daily News here, was placed under oxygen Wednesday night after c-ntcring the lu.spital but that treatment was discon- tinued yesterday. ._________._ At pupils of your eyes ad- mit only about one-half the amount of they did when you were 20. Keeping in mind that the Old Clothes drive for aid to desti- tute peoples overseas ends Jan. 31. Atla is making a citywide collection Saturday morning. Many have taken clothing to the collection centers at schools here but others have lacked a way to get their contributions to the schools. The people of Ada are asked to have on curbs or front por- ches, where the bundles can be easily seen, their donations ready by !i a.m. Saturday morning. Boy Scouts will do the col- lecting, directed by Rusty Har- ris and Bill Lee. Harris and Lee, in turn, are asking that all autos and trucks that can be made available be at Convention hall by !l o'clock so that the collection over the OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. statewiele program to sell Oklahomans on Oklahoma is due to be launched by editors during a meeting of the Oklahoma Press Association today. Tim preif'ram will bo organiz- ed, sponsored and paid for by the newspapers the state-. Paul F. Miller, publisher of the Broken Arrow Le-dgcr, will fol- low Gov. Robert S. Kerr em the program during the afternoon the promotion idea. It will consist of news stories, complete with pictures, syndicat- ed through the press association office in Oklahoma City to all Oklahoma newspapers. The stor- ies will deal- with industrial de- velopments, scenes of public in- terest, anel other little known facts concerning the state. To Stand On Own Feet "We expect the program to stand upon its own feet as a news service and the newspapers through the press association will pay all said Miller. The program will be known as "Oklahoma and will tell other towns how some Ok- lahoma has developed, or landed, an industry with the idea that almost anv town can repeat the performance with variations. The program was the big bus- iness of the meeting which start- ed today with an estimated 300 in attendance. First speaker was Harrington Wimberly, Altus, a member of the federal power commission. He told the editors that if he had any special qualification for his job it was the attitude of the average Oklahoma newspaper- man eif gaining information about national and world affairs and "I hope we'll never grow provincial down here." Can Help With GI'.s Walter Johnson, with the U. S. veterans employment service, explained the GI on the job training program and answered a number questions. He urged editors to support the program in every Way possible and sell it to their readers, and use it them- selves to put veterans back to work. Asked a question from the floor as to whether veterans surplus property he no case had he heard of a satisfactory deal being tnaelo anel that in his opinion a GI do better to depend upon private sources for necessary equipment. Georrp Knox. Jr., of the Knox advertising agency, warned the newspaper publishers that they will lose business in the competi- tive period ahead unless they do a better job of printing and of servicing accounts. Tom Tanner, C.-iltaiumga. Tenn., discussed the labor situation for the publishers. Members of the press associa- tion were guests at the Friday iVrum luncheon of the chamber of commerce anel their afternoon program was devoted to a discus- sion of the Oklahoma Unlimited program. Garb Is Smile's the Same wearing the now "civvies" that have replaced his lieutenant- general's uniform. Jimmy Doo- little flashes the same old Doo- little smile as he assumes his duties as a vice president of the Shell Oil Corporation. He's pic- tured in his New York office More Against Tojo, ef al Russia, France, Nether- lands Join Tribunal to Try Jap War Crimes Suspects city can be made speedily efficiently. Those collecting....... will bring it'to the Shannon Feed company. 309 East Main, where the manager, Julius Hanson, will have a crew of men ready to do the packing for shipment. Cold Wave Due In State for Weekend 11 r Thr Annnrliilnt rrrm Strong northerly winds will carry a cold wave into Oklahoma tonight plunging the mercury as low as 10 degrees and bringing snow flurries to the north. The state weather bureau issu- ed a warning for own- ers to prepare for at least 48 hours of bitter cold and wind. Winds reaching HO to 40 miles an hour will bring the cold wave first to north and central Okla- homa anei temperatures will drop as low as 10 to 15 degrees. By mornini! the cold will be felt al- so in the south with minimums The giant Paris gun used by the German.-, in World War I fired weighing H2H pounds, only Hi; pounds of which were explosives. and i of 15 to 25 eiegrees. I Skies will clear by Saturday the clothing i night but the colel will continue through Sunday, the bureau said. ComparativeU- mild tempera- tures and bright skies preceded the cold wave forecast. The mer- cury dippeel no lower than .15 de- grees in the state last night. Ard- inore recorded that minimum af- te'i- Guymon recorded (i2 degrees as the state high. By DUANE HENNESSY TOYKO. Jan.. 25, Prance and the Netherlands to- :lav joined (lie international tri- bunal that will try Japan's top crimes suspects, including [lideki To in. Japanese premier it the war's beginning. Announcement of their partici- pation ended weeks of uncertain- during which only the United States. China and four members of the British Empire had parti- cipated in preparations for the trials, which may start in March. All nine signatories to the surrender of Japs aboard the Missouri September 2 thus will take part in-the trials his Pearl Harbor cabinet and oth- er top flight Japanese, said Joseph B. Kecnan, chief U. S. prosecutor. Empire representatives are Great Britain. Canada, Australia and New Xealand. A radio message from Moscow announced that Russia had nam- ed a juelge ami an associate pros- ecutor. Only a few day ago. came here as chief prosecutor at General MaeArth- ur's invitation had said Russia's continued silence "makes it look pretty certain Russia won't come in." Moscow had ignored two in- vitations to participate. j Russia named a major general i to sit in judgment on the Japan- ese anel a man de-scribed as direc- tor judicial science to be an assistant prosecutor, but their names were garbled in the cable to allied headquarters. Truck Drivers End St. Louis Strike Strike Closed Down Mony Businesses, Industries, Idled Persons Read the Ada News Want Ads. sday thev spent the day g. ir.endmg ;.nd pa  be sentenced next week. County Attorney -Vol Crawforc said that the two boys admittec taking four sacks of "sugar from Johnson's Bakery recently in stead of two 100 pound sacks as they had previously said. They told the county attorne> that they sold two of the four sacks of sugar for to Trim Dixon. They further admitted tha when they were caught was no the first time they had enterec the bakery, taking sugar from the establishment. When the bakery was enterec about three weeks ago, the boys took 100 pounds of sugar and sole it to J. C. Whitakcr for S15, ac- cording to County Attorney Crawford, who said that the ne- gro youths have decided to do a little talking. The county attorney said that Sheriff Clyde Kaiser and his dep- uties found 32 gallons of choc beer in the making Thursday and connected the beer with the first 100 pounds of sugar sold. County Attorney Crawford said Friday morning that he had filed charges against Trim Dixon for receiving stolen property "The boys told me that Dixon drove his car to the place where the stolen sugar was stored and kept watch while they put the sugar in his auto." Crawford said. Hospital Now BALTIMORE. Jan. Don Edwards. Jr., 4, Ponca City, Okla., a "blue" baby, arrived at Johns Hopkins hospital yester- day for prc-oprrative v.ill determine whether or not a delicate operation can save it. A congenital m a 1 formation prevents the baby's blood from getting sufficient oxygen. "Blue" lips and fingernails result. Only at John Hopkins docs Dr. Alfred Blalock perform the op- eration which he and Dr. Helen U. Taussig discovered 14 months ago and which they said saves CO per cent of these cases once considered beyond surgical aid. OKLAHOMA "CITY. Jan. T. Williamson, former University of Oklahoma profes- sor will become history and government instructor at Ok- lahoma City University next Monday. Williamson received liis AB degree from Central State college. Edmond. and his MA at Oklahoma A. Sc M. col- liege. Asked about the CIO action in the face of the AFL decision to resume work, Clark replied: "My personal opinion is there will be a rebellion in the ranks of the AFL. We do not pull pup- pet strings in our organization and we have no two-man rule. "I believe the sentiment in the rank and file in the AFL is the same as that in the CIO." Clark did not elaborate on hii reference to "two-man rule." In the current strike, instructions to the AFL strikers have been transmitted by Earl W. Jimcrson, union president, and Patrick E. Gorman, secretary-treasurer. An AFL union involved in the 10-day old walkout, however, last night issued back-to-work orders f9r its 55.000 members and offi- cials advised President Truman, "we shall cooperate with vou in this seizure fully." The action of the AFL union brought no immediate comment from the CIO United Packing- house Workers. But the union's national wage policy committee, representatives of all CIO locals, met today (10 a.m. cst) to make a decision. Rank and file strikers planned a later meeting (6 p.m. Up To Rank And File Lewis J. Clark, CIO-UPW pres- ident, who had urged President Truman to call a conference ot federal officials with the two unions and packers involved in the wage dispute, asserted that "the decision as to whether we will go back to work is up to the ronk and file of our mem- bers." He said the union's membership was "gravely concerned" over seizure of the packing industry because "they will be asked to return to work without any as- surance of wage incre-.ses. Sei.t- uro at this time x x x interferes with the exercise of their right as free men to strike in protest at the refusal of the packer! t.-> pay a living wage." Officers Can't Decide Clark asserted that do not pull puppet strings on our mem- bership and n matter of such im- portance cannot be arbitrarily determined by union officers. conditions under which they wilt go back to work is also to ba decided by the membership." Most all of the strikers at the big Chicago stockyards are members of the CIO United Packinghouse Workers union. President Truman, in his order for the department of agriculture to take over the plants of 19 com- panies, said there would be no changes in wages or conditions of employment immediately. Gaylc G. Armstrong, designa- ted by Secretary of Agriculture Anderson to be in direct charge of plant operators for the gov- ernment, said the decision of the AFL Amalgamated Meat Cutters union ordering its men back to work "signifies a good spirit of cooperation. It is an encouraging development." Will Test In Alfalfa County CHEROKEE, Okla.. Jan. G. Mouser of Perry has leased acres of land for oil development along the west border of Alfalfa county south of the Salt Fork river. The drill- ng date was not contained in cast agreement. -------------k------------ Address Is Complicated ALVA. Okla.. Jan. Lmcry Thurman has a hard giving his home address: He i northern Woods county in Ok- ahoma. gets his mail at Kiowa, Xas.. docs his banking at Hardt- ner, Kas., is on a Capron, Okla, elcphone line, and is served by as the county seat. Read the Ada News Want Ads. TH' PESSIMIST "Dude" Lark, when asked wher' he got th' blende he wuz out with th' other night, said he didn't know, he jest opened up 'is billfold an' ther' she wuz. Some o' th' cutest things In th' drug stores ain't fer sale.   

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