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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 24, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 24, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             ...h, b. n cases Fair today and Friday, not 10 cold northwest UmiKht; Marnier Friday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd Year No. 239 BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY. JANUARY 24, 1916 Navy Announces Its Plans for Gigantic Atomic Bomb Tests Vast Operation Starts in May, Using 97 'Guinea Pig' Warships from Battleships, Carriers to Small Craft By WILLIAM A. KINNEY WASHINGTON, Jan. navy raised the curtain today on its plans for testing the atomic bomb against a great armada of fighting experiment expected to revolutionize .sea warfare. A guinea pig fleet of 97 vessels, ranging from carriers and battleships, submarines and transports to an assortment of smaller craft such as landing ships, will be the atomic tar- get in the vast operation to start in May. The laboratory selected is the Tests to Be Tar Away' Bikini Atoll Long Way From Anywhere, Native Dwellers to Be Cared For WASHINGTON', Bikini Atoll, thr the Jan.. 24. site picked for test on naval way from jl- r.toinic boml. is n Innf Ir.rif' ar.vwhrrr It 170 miles from the Mar- Islar.ds nf Eniwctuk K'.1..! ia I? in. u hich people r.r-.rr heard of until tiny became of battle in the Pacific campjicri acainst the Japanese. Its distances from better known places include Guam. 1.573 miles: Honolulu. San Francisco. 4.153: Truk, LOGO: Yokohama, 442. The Cor.il Atoll is 21 miles lone and c r.sists of more than a i.f tinv Islands. Thr native number onlv Uil. '1 he navv announcement of the I trs: raid "adequate measui err." WfM'ci be taken to insure their t Safrtv. A'.oll ;trr shallow. nvrriiEing about 2') fathoms. !'he beit anchorage', near the Is- land of Bikini, is yards from the beach and 11 fathoms d'.-cp. Capture One of Men Sought in Series Of Arkansas Crimes FORT SMITH. Ark Jan.. 24, county, city and mili- tarv police were combing an area foj'.h of Fort Smith today for or.r of f.1. o riien ;uuejit in con- nection with the slaving and lob- binj: of a Mi na druggist, ihr duction of llnce pr-rr-ons find a :i-s of oli'.er all commit- ?r-i alter midnight Wedr.r-.rlav. O.-.o n! pair. .1 ear-old Cikl.i youth, was ap- pMhe-r.-Jcrl tarlv this moriimg was jail here. A posse, headed by Sheriff Ben G'ren of Sebastian county, trnl- '.he other man. v.-ho was said to br traveling  r wages increases averaging bout 25 per cent, and for changes the working rules to improve Truman Says Struggle For Power Is On That Management, Labor Have Too Much Now, Pow- er of People Needs Assertion WASHINGTON, Jan. President Truman said today much current industrial strife was a contest for power between management find of which, he said, have too much power. The public interest, he added, demands settlement of the steel strike on the basis of his 18'z cents wage increase proposal." Mr. Truman said, however, that he did not intend to seize the steel industry at this time although he did not rule out that future possibility. Many Run Own Steel Plant It was necessary for the gov- ernment. Mr. Truman said, to assert the power of the people in preventing strikes against the public interest. The president disclosed that consideration is being given to j federal operation of a govern- I ment-built steel plant in Utah. The government built a plant at Geneva, Utah. Mr. Truman's views were ex- pressed at a news conference. Asked about a proposal by Benjamin F. Fairless. president of U. S. steel, that he call an all-management conference on wages, the president said he was i wages, the president onditions for railroad emploves. I always ready to talk to business ders. Doesn't Want Steel Seizure Washington sources said that leaders. strife. 3, Column I) W.-udion. look his truck an.I left hi.-n in thr cab n was wrecked five miles soutn c f Gc.-en tTrd a fa Bl. d.-ovr- 15 .T.. ;n his she Blair's car thr men ill.llsr OCCUHir.l t.v abducted Bl'nr s north of V.'ai i  ANNT.U, DAIKV DAY SATTRDAY STILLWATER. Okla.. Jan.. 24. J. Berry, extension dairv v.-lio rstahlishrd tli" na- '.ior.'s firs', aiiificial insemination :n New- Jersev Saturd.-.v at Oklalio- college's annual early Thursda.. Wednesday night at Shawnee President Truman, an armed robbery job was pulled along with other bv three unidentified white men i se fl''cnds of organized labor, one of whom was drivinc a blacl- i p n to launc1' a series of similar speeches in the house. Senators Morse Kilgore (D-W V'a) and Murray (D-Mont) are expected to carry on along the same line in their chamber. Tin-sir members hope not only to gain supporters, but also to strive off quick passage of several pending labor bills which they consider too restrictive. Will 5-pr rr.a A. fisiry da A. .M. sprcialis'.s will ive talks on new lenahtenitiR the pasture season. DDT and cat- tle Dr. Hcnrv G. Bennett. A. .V- M. president, arc! I.. N. Stinnett, ex- tension suecinlist who has en in chnrce of the artificial rr..-nation in Okl.ihoma. .speak in the afternoon. JWEATHER! today and Fri- day, not so cold northwest warmrr Friday: lowest r: 2fi's to -ppcr 2ii'i east .-.nd south. convertible coupe. The robbery place at 2 a. m. One ol the- men was dressed in a soldier's uniform, another was medium sized, wearing a 'lark mackm.v.v and a third man was small with fair complexion llolclenville is having trouble, with two Hock Island railroad tool houses broken into; missing were one pike maul and one line bar. Hudson's Produce company Moore's Elevator and Major's Ll< valor were broken into, but nothing was from either. A safe in the Hudson place was cracked and two pairs of cheap gloves were missing. VFW Will "MeeThi New Hall Tonighl Tonight (Thursday) at 0'- clock the local post of Veterans of Foieign Wars will tn'-c-t fnr th" first time in their new hall This is at 102! 2 East Main upstairs. Work has not been completed on the new hall and much n yet to be done, but the VFW members are invited to come to this week's meeting, see what has been accomplished and get some idea nf what the completed nrw quarters will look like. More Boxes Needed For Old Clothing Several hundred paper or wooden boxes are needed by the Victory Clothing Collection cam- paign as the drive in Pontotoc county is getting more momcn- WASHINGTON, Jan. 24 luy i i Truman todav an- Ssevoral hundred boxes have i nounced General Carl A. Spaatz's already been used by officials i appointment to be chief of the of the drive and several hundred army air forces, succeeding Gen- more nre needed in a hurry, drive era] Hcnrv If. (Hap) Arnold officials said Thursday. Any merchant who Pickets to Let Car Of Army Meat Pass OKLAHOMA CITV, Jan. M'; An agreement to permit a carload of meat destined for the armed forces to pass picket lines I of striking Armour and company [packinghouse employes was reached during a hearing on an injunction request by the com- pany in district court here today. The carload of meat was held up by the pickets who have es- tablished a line across railroad tracks leading to the company's packing plant. The company sought an in- junction restraining picketing of the tracks in a district court ac- tion filed yesterday. No decision was" made on the request that all traffic on the railroad be permitted to pass pending a hearing Saturday be- fore District Judge Clarence Mills. than those presently Against this stand, those re- portedlv in favor of relaxation are said to be convinced there should be more "give" in the price policy so the government would have more leeway in wage- disputes. Boyd Unimproved From Wounds He Received Tuesday Albert Uoyd, who received a knife wound above the heart in a fight involving knife play Tuesday afternoon, is still in Valley View hospital, where his condition is reported as fair. with no improvement made over Wednesday. Several persons have been questioned in connection with the stabbing, but no charges have been filed by the county attor- ney's office. County authorities have not been given a chance to question Boyd as his condition has not improved. An arrest is expected when he is able to talk with au- thorities. no the sup Spaafz to Become Air Forces Head has boxes that can be used to pack clothing to he sent overseas can get them called for if the merchant will telephone and ask for Ken- neth Ambrose. Boy Scouts will assist in the collection Saturday when they make a thorough canvass of the town, gathering any clothing that is to be donated. Head the Ada Newi Want Ads. The president told his news conference that General Arnold will retire upon his return from his current South American tour and that Spaatz will take over his assignment. Arnold wanted to retire some- time between Feb. 1 and Feb. 15. the president said, but added that he did not know the exact effective date at this time. A war department source said yesterday the change would probably be made Feb. 15. Finalists Selected For Science Award WASHINGTON. Jan. finalists in the fifth an- nual "science talent search" con- ducted- among high school stu- dents throughout the nation by the science clubs of America and educational foun- dation were announced today. The girls and buys will be giv- en all-expense trip's to Washing- ton in March when they will compete in the final test for the awarding of in scholar- ships. 1-our year scholarships of 400 each will be awarded to the top boy and girl, and eight four- year scholarships of also will be given. The remaining will be distributed in ad- ditional scholarships at the dis- cretion of the judges, said Wat- son Davis, director of the science clubs of America. The forty by states, included: Oklahoma Donald Herbert, j Jr., Tulsa. The Chamber of Commerce to- day heard the appeal of Gene Gulick and Harold Norris for a freeholders' election in the City of Ada, preparatory to revision of the municipal 'charter, un- changed since its writing in No action was taken, no motions or resolutions being en- tertained. Gulick said he represents special group" in making plea, and further asks for port neither of any individual nor of any particular form of city governcmnt. Norris said Ada "is at the one leading to grad- ual decline and oblivion, and I blamed on provisions of the pres- enl charter such failures as the i three-day halt in water service 1 in the summer of Norris added that the fault was not of any person, but of "inadequate tools" for good government by the present charter. Gulick noted three, at least, sections now of date. One is tin- salary provision, setting at monthly the maximum salarv that can be paid a city official. Higher pay is a requisite to effi- ciency, Gulick declared. Another is the limitation on handling city lands. Another is the authority of commissioners to transfer ac- counts set up by the excise board for a specific purpose, noting that in recent years fund for sewer construction" in northeast Ada was drained for other pud- poses. (Continued on Page 3, Column 1) County Records 136 Service Discharges During Two Weeks Two marines, 44 navy and S3 army discharges were filed with the county clerk H.vring the past two weeks for a of 136 re- corded during the 14 day period. Those filing navy discharges include John B. Farnham, Jr., Norman L. Crossoti. William E. Htirsh. Eugene C. MeGee. John W. T.irver. Johnnie' Hawkins, a 'William R. Cloar. Eugene V. Ba.v- ley. James M. Taylcr, Elmo T Roberts, Warren H. Shumard, Bill Dorsey, Jr., Senator H. Col- bert. William A. Price. Jr., Har- vie L. Creager. Thomas E Bar- ton. Clifford B. Wood, Earl H Acklcy. William L. Tolliver, Lovd C. Barriers. Carl T. Morris. Carville F. Me- Crnw. L. D. Moshier. William G Long. Jr.. William W. Poc Clay- ton B. Oliver. Johnnie J. Burk, William A. Rimyans, Nelson L. Russell C. Lee. Oran M. West. James O. Shaw. James i Edward C'liirk. Marshal J. Clary, "tha I, Danley, Barnrv Jr.. Zc.-ik E. Everett, Earnest D. Deaton. Charles II. Russell. Julian M. Campbell. Edward E. Platt. 1 Ira A. Jenkins, Chester L. Nix. and Charles M. Holt. Thomas L. Honks and William J. Russell filed marine dis- charges. Men filing army discharges were: Jrffie A. Pigg. Homer E. i Wyccff. James J. Boiles. Jim Alexander. James L. Downs, i Basil A. Wright. James D. Helm- ler, Gordon L. Tyler. Henry P Boron, Arnold Franklin. Arlen Braden. Clyde Edward R. Kinsey, Howard M. Sliger. j Louis Bowers. John A. Ryan. Le- roy H. Johnson. James R. Kastiin Walter P. Samit.-, Henry Alfiv I. Billv J. Wilson. Tom 'F Mosh- ier. Cecil A. Burkhart, Esk-'l D Ward. Herbert L. Beam. Youlcs M. Mays. John A. Kassay. P-.-rcy M. Wilson, Hollis R. Walter L. Grisso, Alvie N. Gos.s. Ernest N. Jones. Jr., Paul K. Bedgood J. C. Allen. Everett R. Stone, Oscar L Fort tier. Elton N. Bow- man, Joseph B. Crawford. Wal- lace Fowler. Seizure Will Not Boost Meat Prices Government Promises Ceil- ing Prices on Steoks, Chops Will Not Be Raised WASHINGTON. Jan. government promised the nation's housewives today that federal seizure of meat-packing plants will not boost ceiling prices for steaks and chops. Secretary of Agriculture An- dcrron said all meat products will continue to be sold under present OPA retail ceilings after his department takes over oper- ation of the struck meat plants Saturday. President Truman's decision to seize the meat plants were 263 000 CIO and AFL workers have been made idle by a wage dis- pute stirred much speculation whether the administration might resort to similar action in other current major strikes. The liouse had nothing to say on that topic. Shipyard Dispute Studied Otherwise, the country's criti- cal labor picture showed few im- portant changes. However, effort o resolve the wage dispute of OaO.OOO shipyard workers by means of a compromise proposa'l were being studied, with the possibility of a decision during he day. The most important question for the women who do the coun- try s marketing and cook its meals still was whether federal operation- of struck meat plants would restore a normal flow of meat to their neighborhood butcher shops. No one yet knew the answer to that one. The reason was that approxi- mately two-thirds of the strik- ing CIO any pledge to the government Uiat they would return to work once the plants are in federal hands. AFL strikers, numbering have promised to be back on their jobs Saturday as "loyal Ameri- cans Some CIO men were against resuming work unless their wage demands were met or unless their national leaders ordered them back. One of the latter laid present policy" dictated con- tinuance of the strike, regardless 01 federal Subcommittee For Hawaii as Stale Recommends Legislation Admitting to Statehood WASHINGTON, Jan. house territories subcommit- ter recommended today that tha full committee "give immcdiatn and favorable consideration to legislation to admit Hawaii to i statehood. I The subcommittee concluded in Hawaii last week two weeks of hearings on the question. The unanimous report said 'The people of the territory of Hawaii have demonstrated bey- ond question not only their loy- alty and patriotism, but also their desire to assume the responsi- bility of statehood." It added that statehood is des- irable since: "The policy of the United Sta- tes government is one of self- determination: that peoples be allowed to choose freely their form of political status a'nd Ha- waii's strategic location in the Pacific plays so large a part in our country's international posi- tion in this area." The subcommittee said that Hawaii, with its population of more peo- -.ate except Oklahoma had at the time of their admission to the union. "The hetrogeneous peoples of the territory live and work to- Lumberman Asks Sane Price Control KANSAS CITY. Jan. office of price administra- tion should build a "sane, sensi- ble and workable price system that isn't full of pitfalls, head- aches and forces misrepresenta- tions." Clay A. Thompson. Okla- homa City, president of the Southwestern Lumbermen's as- sociation, declared last night. Speaking at the opening ses- sion of the association's annual convention. Thompson asserted. "Business wants to return to in- dividual initiative and enter- prise. There is not one mer- chant who is not willing to take his chances on jn open competi- tive market." Approximately 1.500 lumber and building materials dealers from Kansas, Oklahoma. Missou- ri, and Arkansas attended. Head the Ada News Want Ads. Stanley R. Rolf, A.Daniels. j gether amicably; democraticalTy William F. Gouge. A. J. Jack- and the subcom- son. Eugene O. West. Jr., Alfard L. Kinman, Thomas E. Tarwfter, William S. Wellborn. James O. firalv. Leonard O. Mickey. Henry II. Driskell, James T. Browning Jr.. Arthur L. Franklin. Walton r. Isaacs, Fred Stalcup, John B. Morev. William Phillips. Jr. Luther Lairson. Odis R. Fields Browcr F. Simpson. Morris H. Ned. Lee B. Lackey Jr.. Samuel W. A. Turner. John W. May, Arth- ur A. Grisso. Curtis H. Gray, Loyd Dempsey. Kenneth L. lowler, Kenneth C. Hughes. Sidney L, Herndon. Jess H. Smallwood. William E. Mixon, Floyd E. Ferguson, Lloyd Full mgim. Monroe W. Abbott. Otto E. Harris. William R. Tidwi-M. John W. Murphy. Morris J. G.ir- ri'tt. Abner T. Smith. Augustus G. Gaar, Jr., Aaron F.' WiHiai.is, John E. Walling. Jess Lewis, Doyle F. Arthur. Donald G. Wy- ckoff. W. Baker. Glen J. Brumlcy. James L. Benge, Frank Bishop. Fred H. Gray, Lorov Thompson. Roy E. Paul G. Davis and George Jo'.in- son. KIRKSV1LLE, Mo., Jan 24 Dr. William S. Childs of Salina. Kas.. a graduate of the American school of Osteo- pathy hero, has been named com- mencement speaker at the school's graduation ceremonies M.uch Rend the Ada News Want Ads. mittee asserted. BUENOS AIHES. Jon. 24 two weeks strike of Stcvcodores which paralyzed the Buenos port was settled today with workers obtaining high wages aind shorted hours. Work was resumed. I TH' 1 I PESSIMIST Th' way o' th' transgres- sor may be hard, but nothin' compare with th' way o' t' Jh' house hunter. Why you're right you learn nothin'. if you're wrong you won't admit it an' still learn nothin'.   

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