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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 22, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 22, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Fair today, tonight antl Wednes- day: slightly uarmrr today and tunicht: cast half Wednesday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd 237 ADA. OKLAHOMA. FIVE CENTS THE COPX No Fathers, wives Glad, u c iSad as They NO Army, HyS Qujt England General Ike Cornered by Women, Chief Of Staff Explains Why All Fathers Can't Be Released WASHINGTON. J..n 22. Grn. ight D. Kiscnhower told h group of irate war mothers who confronted him today on Capitol Hill if all fathers were dis- cha: KC-.1 from tiie army "''u-ie will be no army." A scuie of wiuiieii. representing units of tiie servicemen's wires and childien's association, met the chief of ;taff outside '.lie ol- fice of Chairman May (D-Ky.) as he arrived to explain tion policy to the house military committee. Ciirnrrrd Him They told him bluntly they wanted to talk to him and rd him ir.to May's small office, in office building. Big Adventure Starts For Hundreds of British Brides Of American Soldiers IIv BARBARA WACE LONDON, Jan. big adventure of moving to new homes in the United Stat. s over the sea route traced b." genera tions of their ancvsto's began by rail todav for 2IK1 British brides of American soldiers. .'arkrd aboard a crowded trim in Water- loo station, they ihe long journev to the west a few min- utes before noon. Sixtv of the wives had children with them. There was a cl-iud of wavi.ig hnndki-rehiefs as the train puffed out of the gloomy rtation into London's fog. enr.iu'e tc an at my processing station at luhvorti, near Southampton. The first 200 will be followed tlii'; afternoon by -100 more wives. All will sail on the liner Argen- tina Saturday for a crossing B-cVri 4 co r r i which ''cquir.. a week f 'p cene Relatives crowded the station. bl" i..ca .o. a it A n.muits 10 ansut.r more smiles. Gifts changed hands in hurried goodbyes. Grey women of the London women's volunteer service served hot tea to the tensely happy assorted questions fired at him simultaneously by almost all of the women. May finallv insisted that one of them do the talking and Mrs. Durjt-y Galomb. Wilkinsburg. Pa., secretary of the group, wasj designated spokesman. said flatly that mothers] husbands are in service1 are with demobiliza- tion procedure and claimed that one out of every three marriages 15 ending m divorce, with service families involved in most of them. Can't Stand Isolation Declaring that mother.s, while trusting their husbands, look I v ith alarm at pictures of frater- nization of servicemen overseas, trie ajkcd Eisenhower: "How do you think we mothers feel? Marriage won't stand this isolation." tCa few -tered Johnson's told the- women there are about fathers 1.1 the army and everything is being done to get them out in an orderly manner as rapidly as possible. "If I drop them out today" re- gardless of their eligibility for re- j lease." he said, "there will be no i army." Eisenhower said replacements are being obtained and trained j as rapidly as possible. He prom-1 :spd the delegation he would per- i sonally handle any formal pro-' gram they submitted. (Continurd on Page 3, Column 1) Negro Youths Say Took Sugar From Johnson Bakery Harold Dlaylock and Richard Vaughn. 17 year old negro youths are in county jail waiting a hear- ing in district court after enter- ing a plea of guilty in a justice court charges of burglary second degree. A signed statement by the boy? Bakery pounds room. They recently and took 200 of sugar from a store gained entrance by pry- ing open a door to a flour chute. They took the sugar from building the same way they tered. the en- Man Wanted Here Caught In Missouri Charges Already Filed Against Audrey Booker For Daylight Robbery Charges of robbery with fire- arms have been file'd and war- rants issued for Audrey Booker, whose picture was identified as that of being the man who rob- bed M. and M. Grocery in Ada several days ago. Booker has been caught and is being held in Cartilage, Mo., according to information received by local authorities. Booker is being held in the county jail nt Carthage after being shot through one knee while attempting to rob a store in Carthage. Caught Jan. 14 He was caught Monday. Jan. 14. or one week ago, but auth- orities at Carthage could not connect him with jobs he is be- lieved to have pulled in Okla- homa as he gave his name as .lack Mason to Missouri authori- ties. County Attorney Vol Craw- ford said that Pontotoc county would try to get Booker back in this county to face the charges that have been filed against him. Other Places Want Him He is suspected of having pull- ed armed robbery jobs in three Oklahoma towns before giving state officers the slip and mov- ing into Missouri. On several occasions, officers shot at Booker and on each in- stance ho returned their fire, but no one was hit by the flying bul- lets until he stopped an officer's bullet nt Carthage. Authorities at Carthage who learned the fellow was Audrey Booker, alias Jack Mason, coop- erated with railroad authorities in learning that the man in their possession was the same man wanted by several groups of Oklahoma officers. He was almost captured at Eu- faula by the sheriff of that coun- ty. but left his automobile and girl friend to get away from of- White House Admits Government Is Considering Meat Plant Seizures May Offer New Set Steel Industry In Grip of Paralyzing Work Stoppage Now Effect Spreading to Construction, Railroads and Public Utilities; Production Under 5 Per Cent Capacity By CHARLES WELSH PITTSBURG, Jan. gripped Ameri- ca's basic industry today as the CIO-U n i t e d Stcclworkers strike kept idle for a second day. The biggest walkout in U. S. YA Allotment In Bill Raised Looking to Expansion Of Services to Veterans; Other j Agencies Included j i WASHINGTON. Jan. allotment for the Veterans Administration boosted to today the first regular appropriation bill received by congress since war's end. It will finance various inde- pendent agencies of the govern- ment for the fiscal year starting next July I. history closed nearly 1.300 steel- making and fabricating plants, aluminum mills and iron ore mines in 29 states. Today its ef- fect was spreading to construc- tion, to railroads and public utilities. At 53-Year Low Production of steel, the bone I and sinew of industry and recon- I version, had dwindled to less than five per cent of capacity, a I 53-year low. Two instances of violence flared in Ohio Lut in Mediators For EW Row Schwcllcnbach Names Two Who Go Into Huddle With Union, Company Chiefs WASHINGTON. Jan. -Jl._ of Labor Schwellen- bach today appointed two gov- ernment mediators in the strike of CIO electrical work- 's. They went into session this morning with officials of the strikebound Westinghouse and General Klectric companit and the main the gigantic .stoppage. Charles E. Wilson. General Elcc- bcgun Sunday midnight, was i !'.'c President, A. V, Robertson. begun Sunday midnight, was carried out in complete good or- der. Philip Murray. CIO-USW pres- ident, said in n radio address that the union's strike in support of wage increase demands was pre- cipitated by "an evil conspiracy among American big business" which has "set out to destroy labor unions, to provoke strike's and economic chaos and mulct the CIO United Electrical Work- ers. Two government mediators in the strike of CIO electri- cal workers. The two named were William H. Davis, former chairman of the war labor board, and Arthur S. Meyer, chairman of the New York state mediation hoard. Present at the meeting, called by Sehwellenbach in an attempt to settle the week-old tie-up in tlie electrical industrv, were Charles E. Wilson, General Elec- Of Price Increases Before Such Action Newsmen Told Development on Meat Situation Might Come During Day; No Seizure Consideration on Steel Yet WASHINGTON, Jan. White House of- ficially acknowledged for the first time today that govern- ment seizures in the meat industry are under consideration. Press Secretary Charles G. Ross, however, told a news conference that similar action in the steel industry is not yet being considered. In reply to questions he told reporters there might be some development on meat during the day. He didn't know, he .said, but it's possible. ficers. Girl Friend Held Booker's girl friend is being Polio Chief Dud Lester ques- j held by Okmulgee county auth- tioncd the boys almost continual- critics at Henryetta. ly for 24 hours before they admit- ted taking the sugar from the bakery, but denied having to do with some other burglary cases. In sending the measure to the I ".r e American people through un- funds in a similar bill for the current fiscal year. Vet Expenditures to Mount The committetr- attributed the big increase to the Vetorans Vp To President, Says Stasscn Harold E. Stasscn, former pov- f...... nn. i crnor of Minnesota and a He- Admimstration's need for funds publican presidential possibility and cautioned that expenses for asserted in a speech here "the The man wanted in Pontotoc i aid and rehabilitation of the 20.- onlv prospect of an earlv settle- lintv t., in Ofln flnfl T .----r.l ..f l_ _. county was sentenced to 10 vcirs in the state prison from Antlers Women Disappear On Shopping Trip Stillwotcr, Vinita Couplo Vanish in Cashing STIL1AVATKR. Okla Jan 22. -T' A search was Maile-l t-.d.iv for John II. Uittmar. 35. and Mrs. Goldie May Ih'imason. of Vinita. husbands ri ported their wives disappeared while on a fhoppir.e trip to Cushing last Sat- urriav afternoon. The hu.-bands paid a cheek at Cashing indicated the missing worrcn went to a rtorc there to n-.ake ourcha-Ts but that no trace nf them had been found since tr.ov I'.'ft More. The two women v.-rre d a TOl black four-door bearing a licniso plate thi- numbers 20-17-18. H i g li w a y patrolmen, deputy sheriffs and polictmcn joined in the seaich. ln out was paroled May 5, The sirgar was found by memb- 1 according to information ITS of the city police force after available to local authori- thc boys had" been arrested and I "in city jail for investiga- tion. County Attorney Vol Craw- ford said that each boy is under S5.000 bond. Chief Lester said that tho sug- ar was found hidden in a small sheet iron building near the John- son Bakery. Filaylock and Vaughn were ar- rested in connection with the burglary of three produce houses, but won- found to have had noth- ing to rlo with those cases. riving with Set Rentals For Vet Village STILLWATKIf. Okla.. Jan. 22. !i. Strong. Oklahoma A. and M. college business man- ager, today announced rentals to be charged at tiie veterans vil- lage M the school. Standard trailers will bring monthlv. with bills paid ex- cept for fuel oil. Strong said, with the other facilities costing the following amounts: Expansible trailers S20. month- lv: single unit hutments. fur- r.tshrrl and Slfi unfurnished: fi'iublf unit hoinettes fur- r.i.-hcd and unfuinished. Bod? in college coui primarily for temporary assign- ment to married veterans. Tiilsan Dies Jan. 22 i "I.-. died to her daughter Grace Klmon TVI.SA Bootleggers Get Jolt in Court Those Using Cords With Phone Number May Hove Phone Service Removed MUSKOGEK. Okla.. Jan. who issue cards bearing a telephone number and an invitation to ask for George suffered a reversal of statewide significance in the court of Dis- trict Judge O. H. P. Brewer. Countv Attorney Chester Nor- man won a second round in his fitlit to deprive bootleggers of tclenhone service when Brewer denied a motion to vacate tem- porary injunction against the Southwestern Bill Telephone companv. The defendant company argued at .-i hearing that the case was a civil matter and should be turn- ed over to the corporation com- But the judge ruled it was a quasi-criminal question and properly within his jurisdic- tion. Norman said there was an in- creasing flood of bootleggers' cards offering "dav or night ser- vice" The injunction forbids the companv to furnish service to known liquor dealers. Assistant County Attorney W. .1 Crunin said he had been un- able to find another case like it anv law book. jWEATHERJ today, tonight and Wedr.od.-iv; slightly warmer an-I tonight i.n-l east half "f lir.v tonight hjw 30's. Forecast for Jan. Kansas. Oklahoma and Nebraska Wed- and remaining slightly above normal except slight cool- in? Friday or Saturday; little or except rain in or Saturday. I-'KKK KIWIS I'OK DRIVERS' FAMIMKS STIK r-TSS Tl.'I.SA. Okla. Jan. Free rides for members of bus drivers' families emerged today a-, one inajor point in arbitration of a dispute between union em- ployes' and management of Tulsa Citv lines A three member board, with Perry Porter. Miami, as chair- man. is hearing arguments in a contrnversv which last Novrm- bcr resulted in a nine-day inter- runtion of city bus service. Some ;ioi) members of the Am- algamated Association of Street. Klectric Railway and Motor Coach operators have been receiving free passes for their immediate families and want the practice continued in a new contract. The company ob- jects. Chief Luster said Tuesday morning that he had talked with authorities at Carthage, who told him that Booker, is being held in connection with four armed robbery jobs in that area. Three Boys Admit Burglarizing Home Owner Hadn't Misted What 12-Year Olds Took Three 12-year old boys have been arrested by city police in i connection with burglary of the j home of Wayne Vickers. City police said that the boys admitted entering Vickers' house five times, taking shot gun shells, candy, money and other house- hold items. Vickers had not missed the items that were taken from his house until he was notified by city authorities that they hail been found. One of the youngsters is not new to city police as he has been giving them trouble for several years. He was recently held in connection with a burglary of the Nu-Way Cleaners. Butler Jusf Aboul Vanished Here Cafe Owners Must Sub- stitute Other Items As Butter Supply Vanishes Local cafe and restaurant own- ers and operators have been hav- ing trouble finding butter to serve with their meals, but their troubles are over at least for tin- time being, as there is no butter available. Some cafe operators said Tues- day that their supply of butter would not last through Tuesday, making it necessary to substitute items on their menues. OPA regulations state that n eafe owner may limit a customer to one pat of butter per meal or eliminate it entirely. If butter is dropped from the "menu, a cafe owner must serve with each meal a substitute such as jam, jelly, marmalade, peanut butter or other similar items. Buys Control Of Hinder-liter Co. Tin.SA, Okla.. Jan.. 22, Mi- Control of the Ilinderliter Tool company, one of the nation's lar- gest manufacturers of oil field equipment, has been purchased by Thomas M. Evans. Pitsburgh, Pa., it was announced today. 000.000 veterans of World Wars I and II will continue to mount "enormously." The Veterans Administration allotment was broken into these categories: Administration, medical, hos- pital and domiciliary services, this includes 97 hos- pitals now in operation. 25 ad- ment of the strike still rests with the president of the United States." There was no report of nego- tiations between .the union and major steel producers. Manage- ment of a handful of smaller plants agreed to pay the 18'2 an hour wage increase suggested by President Truman and ac- i. viui tnj- nj i lurumin. i r UIIlilIi IiIlCl ditional hospitals to be in opcr- copied bv the union These c ation by July 1, 1947, and ad- ministrative expenses of the G. I. Bill of Rights. Printing, binding and mail costs. Compensation. Pensions Compensation and pensions, the committee es- timated that the number of vet- erans and dependents of World War II will increase fn m ap- proximately 631.000 last June to by next June. Readjustment benefits under the G. I. Dill of Rights. this total contemplates i yesterday suspended that there will be 628.000 voter- i standing priorities for ans in school or receiving train- ing by July, 1947: re- ceiving guaranteed loans, and Westinghouse board chairman, Albeit J. Fitzgerald, union presi- dent, and James J. Matles, inter- national representatives of the union. Although the meeting of the disputants had been previously announced, the appointment of Meyer and Davis came as a sur- prise. The announcement was not made until the two actually walked into Schwellenbach's of- fice, where the parties were waiting. I No representative from Gen- eral Motors corporation's electri- cal division, which is also in- volved in the wage dispute, at- negotiations with GM were con- tinuing. Chick Production Up For 1945 Over 1944 OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. of chicks by Oklahoma hatcheries was 31 per- cent higher in 1945 than in the Red Request Tests Unity Of Big Three Asks Security Council To Investigate British Inter- ference in Greece, Java By JOHN M. IIIGIITOWER LONDON. Jan. full-scale test of the ability of the great powers to cooperate within the United Nations organ- from SP' "'at the security -......e panics, including seven in Penn-i preceding vear. K. D.'Blood U K v I vii n i :i ?i f ._ receiving unemployment sylvania and a few others as far west as California, kept their plants in operation. Total Output Pitifully Small Hut the total output was piti- fully small. Tlie American Iron and Steel Institute estimated pro- duction Monday at 89.700 tons, per cent of" capacity and the lowest level since when the average weekly rate was tons. In Washington, tlie civilian production administration late all out- chase of' steel and instructed wan-houses to ration all deliver- ies so that no customer will re- payments. Military. ceive more than is needed for naval and national immediate use. President Truman discussed service life insurance, the steel strike with congression- i, then met with the Hospital Peak By 1970 I steel fact-finding board. There Hospital and domiciliary facil-j was no announcement of a fur- ilies. to continue ther presidential move to end work on a program calling for i the strike. a peak of 250.000 to hos- I Head the Ada News Want Ads. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) News Classified Ads S. department of .statistician reported i The figures showed that in MrM.r> the hatcheries produced 31.- 740.000 chicks compared with i in December production w a s double that of the same month in with a total of chicks hatched in that month in 1945 against for the same month the preceding year. Blood said the department's goal for is a decrease of 17 per cent in the number of chick- ens raised on farms on a 15 per t.'nt decrease in egg production. The department also is seek- ing a 10 per cent cut in the num- her of turkeys produced this year. Oklahoma's chick production in was second onl- to that of Texas in a south central group including Oklahoma. Texas, Ken- tucky, Tennessee. Alabama. ,r" sippi, Arkansas and Louisiana. 01 IIK' council investigate and take measures against the mainten- ance of British troops in Greece and Java. Officials privately agreed that this move by delegates represent- ing the Soviet union and the Ukraine, coupled with earlier charges made by Iran against the Russians, had ended the hon- eymoon period of the UNO. U. S. "Middle .Man" American delegates were play- ing down talk of a crisis in the world peace agency, but it was apparent the organization was confronted with some of the toughest problems it could be "It's impossible to say at this time what will be done." Ross said. "The matter of seizure has been under consideration." Un- der further questioning he em- phasized that this did "not refer to steel." Truman Letter Ross made public a letter In which President Truman instruc- ted the steel fact-finding board to continue its "study of govern- mental data" and "remain avail- able for further consultation." Ross was asked if the letter to the steel board indicated that the president doesn't see the need for public hearings yet. Ross replied the letter would have to speak for itself. It was sent in reply to a re- quest for instructions addressed to the president by the board P. Fcinsinger. Roger I. McDonough and Jamn M. Douglas, and read: to Board "I have received your letter dated January 19. 1948 in which you review the activities of the agriculture j to moot" Some" Americans privately that the United i States apparently was moving into a middle man position be- tween Russia and Britain. The- complaints, filed with the security council late last night, accused Britain of endangering I'world peace and interfering with j the internal affairs of Greece j and Java. They came as a com- I plete surprise to British. Greek and Dutch delegates, as well as others. i Observers said the twin moves bv the Soviet union and Soviet Ukraine undoubtedly posed the test yet faced by the Nations organisation. which already had been handed the explosive Russian-Iranian dispute. Involves Council Members They also constitute the first ijiav of action by one member .K> "-nation security council against another member. In Tlie most important part of a I weighing the moves, some offi- political machine the clutch. seems to be Empty Spaces in the Old Corral empty pen, were Jammed to "cming cials emphasized that the new- peace agency's success depend- ed largely upon unity among the major powers. Then- was no immediate offi- cial comment from the British. One British spokesman said, however, that his first reaction was that the Russians were play- ing "tit for complaints against the British to balance the Iranian protests against alleged Russian interfer- ence in northern Iran. The spokesman said emphati- cally that the British had noth- ing to do with the filing of the complaint. What It's For Some United States sources said they were not alarmed by the developments, although offi- cials had hoped to avoid major issues while the UNO remained m its formative stage. "After all." one American of- ficial said, "this is the kind of thing the council was created to cope with." Russia asked for discussion of her complaints in the security council, which was expected to meet late today or tomorrow. I here was no immediate indi- cation as to when the subject would be placed on the council's agenda. AV Conference Set TAHLEQUAH. Okla.. Jan. 22. -I series of conferences on iso and conservation of resources n the Arkansas valley will open at Northeastern Slate col- it was announced today. B. Wertz. dean of Muskogee Junior college, will act as chair- nan of a meeting to be addrcss- 'd by many agricultural and conservation authorities. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads LITTLE CUPED MEAT BUT FRESH MEAT AMPLE HERE The meat situation In Ada is not critical at the present time. Butchers do not expect the situation to change much here and explalg their state- ment by sayinc that plenty of fresh meat is available. There are a few butchers who report they do not have any cured meats and the future is not brluht nor the prospectt Rood for cured meat to be put in the meat cases. Cases In Ada are about as full now as they have been during the past several weeks and have more meat than was available during strictest meat rationing. board to date and request In- structions ss for future proce- dure. "For the present. I suggest that you continue your study of gov- ernmental data and that you re- main for further consultation. "Your sincere desire to assist in every way possible in secur- ing an early termination of this- dispute is highly Falrless I'nheard From Ross replied in the negative when he was asked if anything had been heard from Benjamin F. Fairless, president of U. S. Steel, in reply to a presidential suggestion that the industry re- consider its rejection of his pro- posal of an 18'a cents an hour increase. Ross declined to be drawn into a discussion of charges by some CIO offiicals that, as expressed bv one reporter, there is "a Big Steel conspiracy or union bust- ing." Preuarations for federal seiz- ure of the meat-packing industry were known to be well advanced. New Price Offer Rumored There were reports, however, that the administration might of- fer a new set of price increases to the packers, whose plants have been closed six days by a walk- out of 263.000 workers, prior to seizure action. TH' PESSIMIST Bud Tharp. whose doctor told 'ini never t' cat if he wuz mad or in 'n argument, died yisterday at th' family home o' malnutrition. Th' folks who pay fer a S3.500 home these days 'er in fer a long sick spell in th' not too distant future.   

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