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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 21, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 21, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Just Q migtu not be gppropriote to refer to the conflict just ended as the Mast' World War, for the word means, in addition to the latest one, that it was the final one. P.irllr iliiiiity tills altriiimiii mill Innicht iiiuvtly clotnly in rxtrrmc suutli; t-iililer smithi-ist THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, JANUARY 21, ID-IB FIVE CENTS THE COPY TRUMAN ADDS TO HIS EARLIER PROGRAM Steel Strike Begins Quietly Picket Lines Are Set Up Greatest Strike in U. S. History Has Steel- workers Away from Jobs By JA.MKS .MAItl.OW PITTSBURGH. Jan.. 21, The strike of CIO Steel- workers for higher pay the strike :n American his- nr.-j one of the most far- rtecl today in grim U. S. Budget for 1946-47 UNCLE SAv. TAKES IN: (UNCLE SAM PAYS OUT INCOME TAXES TOTAL INCOME OLD ACE TtUST fUNO The l'.: ike tl-.n. About :ng trie el to 4J into Useful rails i.r can-t :n DO In riures 1. and f.-.-e. Von aio'.jr.d :.e blanketed the na- l.IIMu pi.int.. lang- indls which make e shops .vhich turn thing-: like railroad pem-rs. shut down v.'hich pro- the nation's in --nowy tlai k- C''Id >-t in mo- i hut-down plant.; f12J74.000.OOQ MU.COO.OOO NATIONAL DEFENSf, PUBLIC SOCIAL SECURITY ruiLIC WORKS VET PENSIONS BENEFITS OTHEH CXfJUIlS J 16.000.000.000 I.OS4.000.000 I Ml 000nn NCT INCOMt J3UUJMO.OOO I.OS 1.000.000 17.000.000 Truman Adds To Program Wants Earlier Recommen- dations Carried Out, Five More Measures Put Into Law INfOMI DtflCIT U5.i60.000.000  ..-rp on! continue. It was a shre.vdo ir d gll. hr.w ;s or month., pickets mts anyone ike tiieir jobs These two chart; s give n summary of estimated Federal Budget for fiscal years 10-IS--17. (NEA fight be- tween 1.-.e stcelworkc: s and the rteelmaki-rc. Tins country's l.-'pes for a icronver- :on involved critically be- c.iusc so of American'man- ufacturing Uses steel and steel supplies are very small. A long- drawn out Mrike could break the back of reconversion. Tr.f s'.'-.-l ti a steel ir.rlu.'rv authority who through strike about S a day in Hiti-n ii-.-i-nue i' would have on sti el :ales if there J..v! i-n-n no .-ti il-.e. a-, erage daily v bci-ii inmniitetl Sfl.tifi. V.'IO.MI'I workeis v. ill l-.-e each day they re- _ I'ickrlinc Starts Quietly ___ Ti.e picketing .'Killed quietly. i have had plenty of Vrr.e I" g' for thi dav. with the had 140111- on for Military, Post-War Costs Are Three-Fourths of President's Budget Submitted to Congress Truman Assures That for First Time in 17 Ycori No Increase in National Debt Has to Be Provided For WASHINGTON, Jan. President Truman pre- sented a federal budget to congress today with his assurance that for the first time in 17 years no increase-in the national debt will take place. Military expenditures and the aftermath of war account for almost tluvr fourths of the budget total. The president estimated government will raise Truman Calls For Continuation Of Food Subsidies -1 a and finall Dc-pite ici( f umor.. v. hich 's request had v.-al orr. January must l> broke down intei cession Truman, who sug- e. Tile union T: mi..-in's pioposal "f II'. l.'i; S. St.-el Cm-- v. Inch i; the t of the lll- d tins fii-ure and t ,-m mi rease l.'i cent.-; an hour, at Mr. Tru- poslponetl its :out for one I-I. then r.aid the Hayes Fifth Grade First School Group To Fill Yardstick Joycecs Planning Addi- tional Fund-Raising Func- tions Before Drive Ends Do; .e filth made H.AC.. M-! no! i t j'nnip i-f -i. to fill a yaid- ,n the Mrnch (.f Dime.. c. Other group.-; :i gi.idually flll- .H have turned in filled ones yardstick turned in 'bv the IJjyes grovp v.as v.-orth S20.-10, an.ount tii.it any yard- he v.-hcn'it is C'r-.c ei a A Man njjl ti.t The J C" "'All t S'.ee I fill- is'ic'r, l-oth sides and ed Iv.ittnig dunes on top number of th.it one yai d- 1 n-.'. be known until it i i r.. C'liaisii.er of Cummer- ff Dimes I ooth has been and will kept open 1 c-ntis January 111. tr.e sponsoring of the drive in I'on- .n'y. other ill net ad- ney to i e a-id.-d to the ai-. I''-' i olections. :.e Ada .Ne-.'.s Want Ads. Uy A. MAItTIN WASHINGTON, Jan., 21, President Truman called on con- cress today to retain food sub- sidles as one means of combat- ting inflation and a possible eight per cent jump in the cost of liv- mi; index (or food. Tin; icqtie.t, made in (lie chief stale of the union and budget message, represents an about-Iace by the administration on subsidies. It had planned to end must of them by their June 'M expiration date. Started early in the war to keep food prices stable, the sub- sidies have been costing the gov- j eminent about a year. Mr. Truman said that unless the subsidies are continued "it would become extremely difficult for us to control the forces of in-1 lation." More specifically, he estimated that withdrawal of the subsidies1 would force increases of from three to live cents a pound in j average prices of meat: at least; 12 cents a pound for butter, in i addition to a five cent increase; allowed he t fall: one to two cents a quart for one cent for loaf of bri.-ad, more than a cent a pound for sugar, and eight j cent., a pound for cheese, in add- itioii to a scheduled inn of four rents on l-'ebinary 1. The pie..ident also asked th" lawinakets for v. Inch, together ready available, would permit th.. agriculture department to spend about for subsidies, farm programs, research and for foreign relief operations during the fiscal year beginning July The department's expenditures for similar activities during the current fi-cal year were estimat- ed at TWO OIL 1 IDI.I) WOKKLUS KII.I.KI) FOKT MYKfiS, Kla., Jan.. 21. Tv.-o Oklahoma oil field wor- that tin toward meeting" the bill for the fiscal year beginning i July 1. thus leaving a defecit of s-i.M7.ooo.oon. The tlefeeit. however, will be taken care of, he .said, "by a reduction in the very substantial b; lance which will be in tile treasury during the next fiscal year." In fact the debt itself will be pared from its present S278.000.000.000 to 18 months hence. Mr. Truman, however, called for taxes to be held at present levels. Comparing the new bud- get with the current one, the chief executive said that with war sprniling cutbacks the total for the fiscal year now is estimated at Re- ceipts are placed at 000. leaving a defecit of Salient features of the 1D47 budget: Slajor 1. National defense, occupation and war liquidation will cost including 000.000 for UNRRA. 2. Veterans' pensions and ben- efits art; set down for 000. :i. Sn.OOO.OOO.OOn is earmarked for servicing the war-swollen na- tional debt. 4. Provision is made for con- tinued work in the field of atom- ic en'rgy, but this is a secret item and the funds involved were not disclosed. International Financing 5. International financial pro- grains will require These include the Biclton Woods agreements, export-import bank opi rations and aris- appropi inc from the proposed loan of with funds al- i to Britain. (i. Cieneral government running expenses arc estimated at exclusive of army and navy, agricultural aids, public works and social security pay- 7. More than is included for aids to agriculture and for the commodity credit corporation. largely for price- stabilisation and price support resulting from the war food and production program. Mr. Truman said his budget estimates "are based on the as- sumption of generally favorable business conditions btt not on Rooms Are Needed NOW Veterans Eager to Attend East Central If Living Quarters Can Be Found East Central State college was hit hard by the war with both instructors and students going to war and now that both instruc- tors and have returned to their respective places at the college they are finding it diffi- cult to obtain living quarters. The hulk of the students at the college are returning service- men and are going to school und- er the G. I. bill of rights. The veterans are enrolling and hop- ing that they can find a place to live while attending college. College authorities renort that every dormitory room has been reserved and still there are not enough rooms to go around. Before the war, students found it a task to find living quarters, but now that task has increased until it is a full time job. Many Here First Timr Many students are coming to Ada for the first, time to enter college and are having to spend almost every day looking for a place to live. Or. A. I.inschcid, president of the college, and Mayor Guy Thrash have appealed to Ada citizens to open their homes to Kast Central students. The room or apartment does not have to be anything fancy, just so it is clean. One veteran brought his fami- ly to Ada two weeks ago and started looking for an apartment while living in a local hotel. He spent an entire day looking for a place to live while attending school and after two weeks of searching found a two-room a- parlment ami moved into it. Needed NOW There are numerous other sit- uations that could be cited, but the main object now is finding places for the veterans and other students to live while attending college. W. A. (Gus) Delaney, Jr., ap- pealed to Chamber of Commerce members to rent vacant rooms to students now because the second semester is .starting and the en- rollment at the college is larger than it has been in several years. There might be a few rooms in local hotels, but veterans cannot afford to live in a hotel on per month income. WASHINGTON', Jan. 21. President Truman asked t leg In addition, he recommended these additional measures: of the price con- trol act for one year from next June .'ill. 2 of the second war powers act, priority and inventory controls, b: yond June presumably another six months. of fond sub- sidies beyond June :IO with the proviso that they stop if the cost of living declines below present levels. --I.egi lation cnating a per- mani nt housing agency. of the selective service act beyond the present expiration date of May Ifi. "in case the campaign fur voluiitet rs does not produce" the needed number. The p, o.ideut called for action on thi. befoie Apiil. I-'.ict-l-'iiiilinc Authority Hero are the 21 measures Mr. Truman listed by numbers: law to give fact-finding boards greater powers in labor disputes. so-called "full employ- ment' bill such as that passed by enate. u p plementing unemploy- ment insurance benefits. permanent fair employ- ment practice committee. the statutory min- imum wage from -40 to fi5 cent-: in hour now. to 70 cents after "IIP year, and to 7f> cents after two K--A M-ientifie research agency. health and prc-paid med- ical care program. military training. Increased federal salaries. 10 -Presidential succession leg- islation. By n. HAROLD OI.IVICR WASHINGTON, Jan. President Truman aski d congress today to net behind a sweeping program he said will promote greater output of lower cost today to act on a revised 21-topic j noods by higher tnid worker- legislative program, all of which Aml ,'1P that "voices of disunity" which "are ning to cry aloud again x x x must not prevail." i In a 25.000-word document combining for the first time hath lawmaking and hudgrt rceom- 1 mendalions. the chief executive mixed expressions of optimism over business and job Mil's with fresh warnings against inflation and concern over "ma- jor striki s." j In his budget, Mr. Truman pcg- i ccd government during the fiscal year beginning next July 1 al mlv above antici- ft Asks Entire Domestic Program To Boost Output of Low Cost Goods by Higher Paid Workers I Ono.non.OOO next July to SSTl.OOO.- which, with the b.ickine of pub- (HHMIOI) a year later. ljc will assist labor and lie addeii. however, that he can manacement to resolve their dis- ncrmimend no further tax cuts agreements in a peaceful manner at this time. reduce the number and dur- pated incom. Can Trim National Delit And. by drawing on the treas- ury's cash balance, be said the national debt actually can be re- duced for the first time in 17 years from an expected In the "state of the union' portion of bis message, Mr. Tru- man termed establishment of a "fair wane structure" the "most serious difficulty" in the path of reconversion and expansion, add- "The ability of labor and man- agement to work together, and the wage and price policies which they develop, are social and eco- nomic i-siies of first (liivcrnment Alonp Nnl Ijiomjh lie said labor and management must establish "hitter human re- and apparently mindful of bis leernt fruitless cf- forts to the nationwide steel "No governmc'iit can i men understand aeli other. I agree, and get along unless they 'conduct themselves in a way to foster mutual respect and good will. ation of strikes." Mr. Truman said most indus- tries and most companies "have adequate leeway within which to grant substantial wage increas- es." Good Wages General Benefit Elaborating on his higher wags theory, he said: "Good wanes means good mar- licts. Good husints.s means mont iobs and better wages, x X x Substantial wage increases good business for business be- cause they assure a large market for their products: substantial wage increasrs are good business for labor because they increase labor's standard of livinc: sub- stantial increases are good business for the country as a whole because capacity produc- tion means an active, healthy-, friendly enjoying tile benefits of democracy under our "The government can, how-_____________________________ ever, In to develop machinery I (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) Oklahoma Livestock Germans Are Producers Shipping About as Usual Arnied Services Mcrser of the armed dom j services. 12- A law to cover domestii use and c'-ntml of energy. l.'t- Hetentioti of fedi ral co'n- trol over the U. S. employment service at least until June 30 II I n created unemployment allowances for veterans. l.r> -Social security covcrap for veterans for their term of militat v vice. Iti -KxteiiMoii of crop insur- ance. 17 Authority to sell surplus merchant ships, and to charter vessels both here and abroad. Stock-piling of .strategic III l-'edi ral airport legislation. JO of the Johnson act barrini; private loans to natimm in default on their World I debts to U. S. 21 Development of the Great I.akes-St. Lawrence seaway. -k Lease Triers Ki.se .OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan. pricis in northwest- ern Stephens county were step- ped tip to a new high today by V. H. Stephens. Oklahoma 'City landman. who paid Sli.HI to- day for two tracts West of the west Marlow lield at a slate school land sale. Head the Ada News Want Ads. OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. producers of I Oklahoma are shipping about as usual, at higher prices despite a packinghouse strike here and i a shortage of feed, leaders said today. W. H. Martineau, editor of the Livestock News, estimated that "about three-fourths" of the I buyers here are active, with a more insistent demand than nor- mat to fill. Only Armour ami Co.. here is i closed by the strike. Wilson and Co.. and a number of local inde- pendents are all in need of live- stock, said W. W. Lucas, of the Oklahoma Livestock Marketing association. The independent market, he explained, includes literally hun- dreds of small packing houses which sell usually in retail mar- kets, and thus do not come un- I der wholesale ceiling regulations and some pay no attention to regulations. Martineau said prices paid here last week were so high that Wilson had been practically forced out of the .market "because they were above compliance.'' An estimated II.500 cattle and calves came in here over tin? week-end for Monday's market, compared with 2.000 a year ago. Livestock observers 'said the i feed shortage here now is "about the worst in history as far as 1 Oklahoma is concerned, but it had been made bearable by one of the- mildest winters in years." Not only is there a shortage of protein, but the autumn drouth has held back wheat pastures, and farmers have used up their emergency hay. fodder, and oth- er roughage far earlier than usual. Approve Atom Commission LONDON', Jan. tion of a special commission to devise controls for atomic energy was approved by the political and security committee of the United Nations assembly todav, after only a no-mimitc discussion. Head the Ada Want Ads. vested Alia News C'lassified Ads Glad to Vote First Free Election in 13 Years Brings Out 83 Per cent of Qualified Voters Government Nearer Seizing of Meat Packing Industry CHICAGO. Jan.. 21. possibility of imminent is govern- the moderately 1< dem- ocrats set the pace. It had been l.'i years since the Germans last voted freely. The social democrats with a mildly socialistic platform gar- ni votes of a total of east in 1.200 communi- ties in greater Hesse, which elect- ed village councils. Similar lo- cal elections are scheduled in 000 other small communitie< in the Am', rican occupation zone next Sunday. '1 he Christian democratic par- ty, which ranks about center, ran second to the social democrats with votes. Communists on the extreme left and liberal democrats on the extreme right ran far behind in the tradilioallv agricultural area where the elections were held. The communists polled lli.liOH anil the libeial democrats Independent candidati s won votes, substantiating pre- dictions by German politicians and military government officials that these local elections would not be very significant of Ger- man political trend. The in i I i t a r y government, which supervised the tabulation, said many contests were decided on personalities rather than on political partisanship, iust as are local elections in the United Sta- tes._ The voting was under supervis- ion of German authorities and no instance of trouble was reported. Hondlcss Vet Weds WAC Corporal a used in drilling operations at the Clydc iWEATHERi I----------------------------------------; cloudy thii afternoon and tonight except cloudy in cMrcme south; sightly colder rntithtast and cx- :n middle 20's; somewhat nicipally varir.tr Tuesday. plant and lines. Sunniland oil field exploded last nijiht. J. S. MeKinstry. chief of lions, said the men were and IU d l-'ci ren. MeKinstry said he did know the home towns of tin men but that they were employ- ed by the I.offland Brothers Drill- ing company of Tulsa. holder of a drilling contract in the field. WAYNOKA VOTES ON BONDS WAYNOKA, OKLA., Jan., 21, LT) of Waynoka will vote tomorrow in a special election on an estimated bond issue for improvements to the nmn- owned electric power an income reflecting full employ- mdit and high productivity that we hope to achieve. In future years the present tax system, in conjunction with a full employ- ment level of national income, could be expected to yield more t h a n S.'iO.IIOO.000.000. which is substantially above the anticipa- tcd peacetime level of expendi- tures." In one reference to future budgets, he observed "They can hardly be expected to be reduced to less than Includes Proposed Legislation The budget message was uni- que in one respect. For the first time it included not only the customary estimates based on ex- Stillwater Scouts Still Ship Paper ST'ILLWATKR, okia.. Jan., 21, boy loaded out their 21st ear of scrap paper over the week end. As the scouts entered their fifth year of conducting scrap paper drives they looked at a new total of pounds collected in Stillwater. S. H. Westbrook. boy scout exe- cutive, said the Cimarron valley district, of which Stillwater is a part, holds the record for collect- ing scrap paper in the ninth reg- ion, which includes Oklahoma. Texas and New Mexico. With shipment of the 2Ist car from Stillwater, the district's to- tal stood at 50 cars. There are 47 towns in the district. Scout officials said they were planning another drive within a few months. DeGaulle Resigns Presidency After Crisis in Cabinet (Continued on Page 2 Column 6) Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. I'fe. Robert Langstall. 32 of Anderson, slips wedding ring on finger of Corp. Ruth Spaulding, Colombus. Iowa with the aid of mechanical hooks which replace the hands he lost by machine Kun bullets in Krance. The wedding was performed in Pasadena, lly JAMICS SI. LONG PARIS. Jan. The Communist party launched a drive today to name a Commu- I nist as the successor to Gen. I Charles De Gaulle, who resigned the provisional presidency of I Krance last night following a cab- inet crisis. De Gaulle stepped tlown from the presidency with an an- nouneemcnt that he considered i he had completed the task of i "leading the country toward -lib- eration, victory and sovereign- i ty." i In a letter of resignation ad- dressed to Felix Gouin. president of the constituent assembly, he said: "If I agreed to remain at this government post after Nov. 13, it was to respond to the unanimity with which the na- tional constituent assembly ad- dressed itself to me to take care of a necessary transition. Today that transition has been effect- ed. Besides, Krance. after great trials, no longer is in an alarm- ing situation Party leaders met in a special conference and were expected to call the as "inbly into session either later today or tomorrow. De Gaulle cancelled a radio talk to the nation that he had scheduled for tonight, and re- portedly left Paris-, presumably for seclusion in the country while he waited for the constituent as- sembly to act on ha resignation.' quarters in Washington said that major packing plants might be j in a day or two. i One influential government of- ficial, who declined use of his name, said the question of seizure would be discussed in WashinR- ton today by high administrative Ho saw little Hope of avoiding such action, he told n reporter. Mr. Truman would have final word in any decision to use the weapon, this source adding that the president opposed seizures in labor difputei except as a last resort. emergency presented by the nation's fast dwindling meat siipplie-i rci'iiiies immediate dras- tic action, said this official. Counciliation attempts here to end the walkout of CIO and AKI, workers in the industry were deadlocked on the wage is- sue. A member of the fact-finding board. K. K. Witte. expressed hope of a settlement within two weeks. The already serious shortage of meat in the country's markets might become even worse if 50- members of the unaffiliated national brotherhood of packing- house workers, not now on strike, join the walkout. Car Tag Penalty Goes on Feb. 1 A penalty of 10 cents per dajr will be added to the price of all automobile and truck license plates not purchased before Jan- uary :il, according to A. K. Thornton, tag agent. Licenses not purchased the deadline will increase in price at a rate of ID cents per day for 'M days, after which time the price doubles. The local tag agent is urging everyone who has not already- purchased his license to go to the office before the penalty starts. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads TH' PESSIMIST Too many folks have idea that th' only thing t' do. when the'r spirits 're low, is f call th' bootlegger. Why hesitate f tell your jjt-ncraUy it.   

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