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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 20, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Few words today mean as much to so many people as -housing- and unfortunately about 'little seems to be doing about it as ab out any of the other major problems facing tK. nation. C'louclv and rnldcr Sunday. light rain extreme east Sunday inoriunc. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 235 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 1916 FIVE CENTS THE SHEL INDUSTRY OF U. S. SHUTTING DOWN Trucker Is Fatally Hurl C. M. Dcaton Pinned Be- tween Two Trucks Friday Nighr, Din Soon Afterward M. Dt-atr-n. 42. of 715 East fatally injur- ed carlv Friday night when he was between two a1, an o 1 lease west of Allen. Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Sunday) at from the Funeral Home. Or.e of the- trucks was owned bv Dcr.V.n ar.d driven by Clyde East Seventh. v.a- a driver for Dca- 1nn before entering military ser- vice and had rcfumed liis'work in September. Truck Heing Tiiwed Beaton .-iccompani' d the truck to a location five miles west of Allen, v. here the truck- broke down. It was being backward bv a truri: owned by the W. A. Delar.ev Oil company and driven by Jack Aday. :U.1 East Ninth. A report of authorities said that Beaton's truck into a ditch ar.d was r.tucl: Aday told officer? lie slacked the -A i.-.c'i line anci D'-aton and Jam's Spence. amner for Aday. stepped into tin- three-foot space t.-i untie the line and tie :1_ for a pull fn m a different an- Vehiclp Slinpcd Back Aday's truck slipped back, pin- r.ire Deaton. He died a short afterward. This happened about o'clock Friday night. No charge ban been filed. Scfre nf the accident was ;i half mile south of Mi-Calls Chap- el, tv. o niilei v.e-t of S. H. 12 on Fiar.cis inatl. Dcaton it survive-! by the wid- ow; three Mr--. Ola An- ar.d Mis. Dolhe Laughhii of Ada ar.il Mrs. D.illie Carney of Oklahoma City; two brotiiers Clifton ar 1 Olen Deaton of Ada. Iran Asks UNO For Check on Red Acts Appeals to Security Council to Investigate Interference Iri Internal Affairs; Syria, Lebanon Also Make Demands Wooden Leg Cost Him Only By JOHN A. PARRIS LONDON. Jan. appealed directly to- nii-ht to the UNO security council to investigate "interference of the Soviet Union, through the medium of heir officials and armed forces, in the internal affairs of and announced that direct negotiations with Russia had failed. r The announcement presented the first thorny test to the 11- member council on which five i major nations, including Russia, have veto power. The council, to which armed forces eventually will be assigned to maintain peace, was organized formally only last Thursday. Present Formal Letter One Hurt In Sandy Wreck Oil Center Man Injured In Two Car-Two Truck Pileup At Bridge Delaney Assails Demo Policies Af Home, Abroad i Ado Oil Man Tclli GOP There Must Be Forthright Leadership in Government BT JOHN H. IIOOKKR TV1.SA. rii-.ia, in.- .T> l.nvr.-ic at what h" :i< 'running, and domestic and v.orld W. A. fCJu.-) De- Janev tr.nigr-.! told Oklahoma Kc- that there must b.- "fortnright in gov- Spcakir-.c bcf'ce than 300 party nienitjcrs a-.-emblnl for the ar.r.'jal Alexander Hamilton day Delaney, Ada ml man. availed what he called lack of truth from to day." be- tween 'xecutivr blanches "of the KOV: nrnent arid people. "If representative republican continues in Amer- t.-.ere must be Jo: thrinht lea- d- rvhiD in t-overnn-ei-.t and him- integrity in its admin- un'ier law and v.ith- :n 'onj of tl.e ciir..sti- t--Von." he HiRh on the speaker's li--t of tarcets for ba.-i'eri criticism came ration-wide s'rikes. the labor foreign and domestic ror.ferer.ccs on v.orld affairs and fnr'-fiririing The latter he as lack- ire ir. i-u.-c-g.-d ir.at cos's of go higher daily and t.-.at oiack niarki ts ilourivh. "If v. e   lahnr controversies r.e c.-.arged that "never has there r-cn ir.nu.-t; strife and I1 J. D. Smith of Oil Center is in Valley View hospital suffering from concussion and a four inch laceration.over his left eye fol- lowing an accident involving two automobiles and two trucks at Sandy bridge west of Ada. Smith was the only person taken to the hospital. Smith, driving a Chevro- let coach, was attempting to pass an oilfield truck driven by Will Klesso of St. Louis, Okla., on the bridge and could not stop when he saw that he did not have time or room to the truck be- cause of an oncoming truck, in- vestigating officers said. Fore and Aft Hi- got far enough around the truck he was attempting to pass that when he hit the oncoming truck, a Wilson and Company vehicle driven by Klvert Pittr, (if Oklahoma City, hcadon the oil- field truck hit his car from be- hind. A four.ii car driven by W. Tilley of Ada was following be- hind the Wilson truck and was involved in the accident but was uninjured as weic the drivers of the two trucks. i Smitti was thrown through the door of his car. went, over the j top of the oilfield truck and I landed between the banister of the bridge and the right rear wheel of the truck. Vantage to Vehicle Heavy Considerable property dam- age was done to both the trucks i and cars. The car drive by Smith I was almost totally demolished. Traffic was blocked at the budge for about -If) minutes or until two wreckers could be MiniMuined to clear the wreckage i and get the vehicles off the high- way. Several hundred persons saw the wrecked automobiles before they were moved. The Saturday afternoon traffic both to anil Jroin Ada was heavy and the number of persons looking over the accident was increased as i traffic piled up. Members of the highway pa- trol who are stationed in" Ada, were quick to arrive at the scene of the accident and soon had the situation under control. After the wreckage was cleared, they took charge of traffic and direct- j ed it until the long lines of wait- mg motorists had ruMimcd their journeys. i The Iranian delegation present- ed a letter to acting Secretary General Gladwyn Jebb stating that a "situation has arisen which may lead to international fric- and adding that repeated attempts of the Iranian govern- ment to negotiate with the Sov- iet Union had "met with no suc- the letter said, "the Iranian delegation to the gen- eral assembly of the United Na- tions, on behalf of the Iranian, government, have the honor to request to you, in accordance with the terms of article 35 (1) of the charter, to bring the matter to the attention of the security council so that the council may investigate the situation and rec- ommend appropriate terms of .settlement Will Supply The letter said the delegation would assist the c'nirp-l by sup- plying a full statement o." facts. It was signed by Scyed Hassan r.-iqir.adeth. Iran's ambassador to Britain and chief of the delega- tion. Iran's broadside came in the wake of a demand Syria and Lebanon that British and Fro.ich troops cvacua'.o soil im- mediately as an to the restoration of tin independence of the Levantine st.il A rusty steel folding chair, purchased for S1.75 from an amazed Dutch army captain, and a leather seat with a pocket knife to carve the wood xvere all that Frank Campbell of Dyer Tcnn survivor of the Cruiser Houston and Hill Miles, Australian in- fantryman needed to build an artificial leg for Bert Joins, (I.) of Bridgeport. Tex., one of the survivors of the "Lost Bat- talion of Java." Sgt. Jones shows the leg to I.t. Paul T. I.ahti at the McClo.skey General Hospital in Temple. Ti xas. The leg was secretly constructed while Jones was in a Jap prison on Thailand and he wore it for two years. I.t. Lahti says the leg is perfect mechanically except for its Corp Photo from IS McKeown Is Demo Leader Former Congressman Named County Chairman As Committee Plans Ag- gressive Year Several Teaching Changes in Schools Supt. Rex Morrison An- nounces Two for Ada High, One for Glcnwood Ten Russians Kill Selves in Germany Several changes in the teach- ing force of the Ada public schools are announced by Supt. Hex Morrison, effective Monday when the second half-year term of work begins. 1 Miss Emma Dell Weatherly has married and has resigned ns'com- mcrcial teacher at Ada high school. Her place will be taken by Mrs. Mattie Bulman Jor.es, former registrar for Ada Junior High who was married to an air- man who was a war casualty being killed in action. Also at Ada high, Mrs. Mary Simpson, who has been teaching math and drivers education, has resigned. Lewis Colbert, who bus taught at Kittstown Bvng and was a principal in the Bync schools when he entered iniliUrry, service in 1942, will tttfce her courses. At Glen wood. Paul Landn'th'f hast Central basketball player back from service, becomes a member of the faculty Monday, i lie .succeeds Wayne Vickers. who this fall has taught and has bad charge of physical education for bovs and who goes to the Ada I r ire Department as a regular i fireman. The County Democratic com- mittee will be headed this year by Hon. Tom D. McKeown, 'for- mer district judge and for If! years congressman from this dis- trict. He will be assisted by Mrs. A. M. Kerr, vice chairman, and E. N. Jones, secretary-treasurer. These officials were chosen j Saturday at a meeting of the precinct officials in their county convention. i At the convention, which was well attended, enthusiastic talks wen- made by many men and women, stressing the importance of thorough organisation and a dynamic campaign. The new county chairman has been fighting in the ranks of the party ever since statehood. When he retired from congress, he did not slow up in his support of the ticket, either local, state or national. Enthusiastic endorsement all the democratic officials shown by all the speakers. for was .01) janitors and charwomen clean ashmgton's Pentagon Building daily, and Ada's best mechanics daily repair Adans' cars at Sinnett-Mcaders. 1-20-lt -Tl.e vi< leading a-.'i of In ,j I.-.e alli-gi-i oigall- :.-ed labor with tlie past 12 T- Pauhuskan Dies _PAWHUSKA. Okla., Jan. K. Xelson. 52. Pawhuska :ca! estate dealer, died in a hos- pital today as a result of injuries v.hen he was struck by an while crossing a. u-jwn'.own t last night. 4- to t.-.e ..ar Japan rar.Ke'i stcclii-.akin" of t.-.e woi five largest crorijcing c. entries, in re- spective o: were the United G( r.-r.any. Ku.-sia. Great ar.d I-ranee. IWEATHERJ ar.d colder S-r-.dav. extreme cast By DON DOANE BAD Germany. Jan. Ten n u s s i a h s who fought for the Germans on the ra-tein front committed suicide and 21 others slashed themselves in a flaming prisoners' barracks at Dachau when American soldiers to force tium to return to Russia. U. S. Third Army headquarters announced. The at fir.-t had bar- i leaded themselves in the bar- racks, set it afire, stripped off t.'icir clothes, linked arms anil invited Ann rican roldiers and Polish guards to shoot them. Not a shot W.-K fired by the Amer- i leans, who tossed tear gas into the barracks and rushed in arm- ;cd only with billy clubs, hcad- j quarters said. I Gen. Joseph T. McNarncy, May is the month for Rradua- eommander-in-clnef of the U. S. I lions here and East Central State i forces m Kurope. said the only college will, as usual, have a Russians forced to return home ceremony appropriate to the oc- under the agreement on re- casion. palliation were those proved to' But there Ada to Use FWA Funds in Planning WASHINGTON', Jan., in. Oklahoma communities prepare plans for public im- 'prnvcments with federal advances approved by.Maj. Gen. Philip'B. Fleming, federal works adminis- trator. The.Jfilnds. approved yesterday, will pp made available through the bureau of community facili- ties, federal works agency, and are to be repaid without interest when construction is begun. The projects include: Novice Gets Wildcat Oil Skiatook Man Made Own Tools, War Interfered, He Returned, Found Oil Sand By JOHN H. HOOKER SKFATOOK. Okla.. Jan. novice operator's first wildcat oil well, drilled with home-made tools and halted two years by military service today- was flowing Km barrels a day with indications that it mk'ht be a new Osage county pool discov- ery. I It was Virgil Greenwood's Xo. 1 well, in SW NK NE of 12-22- I1E. west of the Skiatook pool in i southeastern Osage county and j several miles from the nearest producer in the urea. Tin- 27-year-old former nrmv sergeant decided to drill in i He had a lease, purchased at an Osage lease sale for the mini- mum price of S200, and an uncle, T. P. Greenwoo.-l who had work- ed in the oil fields. Together they shaped nn ade- quate drilling outfit fr'm second hand equipment and powered it with an automobile engine. It had taken more than a year to get the tools ready and spud in. Then Grrenwoo.-l got his army the well down SO feet. Since that time lie received his training and spent two years in Indja. A lease extension saved his" test and Greenwood, dis- charged, returned to resume work and hit pay at feet in the Hurgess sand. Drilling started again late In and in December the well went two fed into the sand with first estimated flow of 300 bar- rels in 24 hours. Total depth was l.fiSU 3 fert. Pinched in and reported await- ing pipeline connections, the well now has a 100-barrel daily out- put. Krni-st Arnold, oil and gas division of the Osage Indian Agency at Pawlmska. said. Meanwhile it was up to the nomenclature committee of tile 36lh Asking Investigation Division in Reunion Calls For Congress Probe Of Tragic Rapido River Battle By Iirr.H WILLIAMSON BROWN'WOOD. Tox.. Jan. 19. With yells of approval members of the division, in reunion here, adopted a resolu- tion today calling for a congres- sional investigation of the divi- sion's tragic Rapido river engage- ment Jan. 20 and 21. 1344. The resolution declared almost 2.900 casualties were suffered by the unit in two crossings of the treacherous Italian stream in the vicinity of San Angelo. Only two "noes" were heard when a voice vole was called for. The resolution was read by Carl Phinney. Dallas attorney and former transportation offi- cer of the division, and seconded by Maj. Gen. Claude C. Birkhead of San Antonio, former com- mander of the group. Hit at System ''It it the resolution concluded, "that the men of the division association x x x petition the congress of the linited States to investigate the Hapido river fiasco and take the necessary steps to correct a mil- itary system that will permit an inefficient and inexperienced of- ficer, such as General Mark W. Clark, in a high command to de- stroy the young manhood of this county and to prevent future sol- Many Workers Leave Jobs, Mills Closing Strike Officially Begins at Monday For Workers; Closing Down of Mills Is Orderly PITTSBURG. Jan. greatest shutdown in the history of the steel industry was under way tonight with thousands of workers already off the job, some'quitting work ahead of the time set for a a. m.. others being sent home by companies curtailing operations in preparation for the stoppage. Approximately 29.000 went on, strike at a few scattered plants after the cotlaspc of eleventh hour negotiations for higher wages, swelling to the num- ber idled by strikes in various parts of the country, some of them over local grievances. Plants In Thirty States Workers generally, however, were waiting the official strike deadline which the ClO-United Steel Workers estimated will take workers from their jobs at 1292 companies in 30 states. An official close to the presi- dentally sponsored negotiations which collapsed yesterday said there was no indication that the White House would initiate any new steel move before the walk- out. Large steel companies went head with the mill closing pro- Kaiser Signs With Murray Accepts Truman's Com- promise Wage Plan, Will Keep California Steel Plant Going By HAROLD W. WARD WASHINGTON'. Jan. Henry J. Kaiser signed up to- day under President Truman's compromise wage plan to keep his California ste< 1 nlant in oper- ation while the hulk of the in- dustry got set for an economy- shaking shutdown Monday. The ClO-Steelworkcrs. mean- while, reported that they were ahsurb think I ever heard" He added that General Clark must have had his reasons for order- ing the Rapido crossings Critical of Clark Btrkhead, in seconding the mo- tion for adoption, said: "With the information General Clark had we feel h-j was derelict in hi- doty when ne deliberately forced the crossings of the Rnpic'lo river Birkhead declared the only objection he had to the resolu- tion was that it was not strong enough. gram. Spokesmen for S. Steel Corporation in the-Chicago and Pittsburgh areas declared the "curtailment program was going ahead as planned and in quiet fashion." Closing Mills Graduallr Steel producers were closing the mills gradually, banking furnaces and open hearths, m preparation for the suspension. i iwj uic suspension. tinned operation for his plant at The shutdown machinery was set rontana. C.alii _ Order Defended WASHINGTON, Jan. --A war department spokesman said today that the Allied sol- diers who fell in the battle of the Rapido river helped make successful the landing of Italy's bcilchllcad in January, The spokesman, designated to answer reporters' about :i demand for 
                            

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