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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 17, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 17, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             lf loco1 tclcPhonc up, bet it would take at least fifteen minutes for word to get around to all parts of the city that a store has a new supply of nylons ready for sale. Fair tonight ami Friday, uarmrr except in Panhandle; loucst to- night 30-35 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, FIVE CENTS THE COPY City Lets Contract For Paving in Ada H. S. Moore Low Bidder on Six Projects; Work on First One or Two Expected to Begin on or Before Feb. 15 At 2 o'clock Thursday Afternoon, city commissioners let a contract for for the paving of blocks in Ada, Mayor Guv Thrash announced. City, County Included In Road Plan State Announces Program For Vast Road, Urban Work For Coming Two Years OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan.. 17. Construction and improvement of 1.152 miles of roads and urban project? at a cost of S27.4I12.lflO announced fur by the i highway commission. Tr.e commission ye.Lterday an- nounced fix programs which will virtually complete highway con- struction under Gov. Robert S. Kcrr's administration which goes out of office next January. The programs include and 1947 postwar projects on the pri- mary federal aid svftcm, the state sid program to be financed with state fur.ds. the first part of the farm tr> market programs and. i4.0ufl.O'H) for urban construction en which specific projects are to be designated. With the exception of the farm- i tj-market program, the programs i The 3P46 postwar program, cal- hr.g for total expenditures of SO.- Astreet in the Southeast Sl'J.863. as it was submitted to trie public roads administration: Craig, US 60. P5 miles of gra- vel biise and double bituminous surfacing, junction of US fifi, five miles of Vinita, northwest, H. S. Moore, local contractor and the man who was low bidder on three blocks of paving on Broadway, placed the low bid, which was just S700 lower than the next lowest bidder. An Ardmore contractinc firm placed a bid of for the entire project. The Ardmore firm bid right along with Moore on almost every item until the cost of content was listed and the big difference showed up. Others Kid, Ton Other bidders on the project v.eie Ed Hunter Contracting company and Rex Bentley. One other firm was listed, but not make a bid. The highest bid was about S30.000 and the next high- est was around the S20.000 mark hirher than the low bid. The new paving may sewn snotted to some people, but when the amount of paving that is con- necterl by the various projects the entire nroiect crows in size nnd benefits to the city, says Thrash. On South Francis Included in the letting is two and a half blocks on South Fran- cis, connecting with existing pav- ing at both ends. The strip of paving will alleviate a traffic rough spot on the one paved through street in that section of town. Two blocks on F.ast Fifteenth from Mississippi to Center ave- nue will also connect with paving at both ends make another General Electric Workers Walk Out A picket line of about General Electric workers formed in front of the main gate to the y Gcncral Electric as a general walkout of United Electrical Workers began Electrical Workers are demanding a S2.00 per day wage (NEA Teh-photo) Truman Calls In His Steel Fact-Finders Pickets Watch Empty Pens Packinghouse Workers Look to Meeting At Wash- ington for Strike Settle- ment Fact Board Named In Meal Dispute WASHINGTON. Jan.. 17, Secretary of Labor Schwellen- bach today appointed a fact-find- ing board to investigate the wage dispute in the meat packing in- dustry. Schwellenbach said the panel would meet later today with re- presentatives of the CIO and the AFL unions and meal packing CHICAGO. Jan., 17, companies who are involved in inghouse Workers maintained j the dispute, picket lines around GM and CIO Leaders Meet President's Top Labor Ad- visers Also or Conference, Truman Urging Decision Jhe in On Highway 11 and Pontotoc. SH In 3 rr.iles of concrete paving aiid n bridges, beginning 11.5 miles of Ana and extending northwest to SH 18. S355.-JUO. Noble. SH 40. 05 miles of grad- ing and concrete paving. Kay county line south to concrete pav- :.-.c. S2r'0.000. Noble. SH -10. 6 miles of grad- ng drainage and concrete paving, junction of SH north Thc 1047 postwar prograrp calls total expenditure of and Wi.shingti.il, US 75. 21 miles of grading, drainage, ten bridges and c; ncrete paving. De-.vcy juuth to Hamona, i Tr.e program also includes1 for statewide highway planning. State Aid Program The be part of Ada. Near Washington School Two blocks near Washington school, one along south side of grounds on Seventeenth, the oth- er from Seventeenth to Kigh- teenth on Oak Avenue. These two blocks will connect Wash- ington school with the paving (Continued on Page 2 Column 5> France in Stern Demand For Death of Nazi Regime Heads piogram v. liirii entirely with i.-.eney will include '-JO pro- ;cc-.s en estimated cost of The projects include: SH 51. 18.3 miles of trade, drainage, bridges, right'of v Oil base, smgie bituminous surface. Canton to Okeer.e. m- K-dir.g North Canadian river bridge. Caddo. SH fi. 11.5 miles of oil single bituminous surface, from 2.5 miles south of Anaclark'i south to Cvril. 50.'. SH 17. !l miles, of .1 base, single bituminous sur- le.Miapmg. Elgin east to Sterling SU-in.f.'iii. On Highway in and McClain. SH 76. 1 6 of grading drainage and right of way from SH 10 west of Lindsay north on new location, traffic bound surface and from SH '.vest of Lindsay traiiic bound surface-, OFU Says Peace Time Military Training Is Waste OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. Oklahoma Farmers Un- ion opposed cominilsory military training in peacetime as "a waste of time" in n resolution passed 'yesterday, it was announced to- i day. H. Lawler. secretary, said discussion indicated the delegates felt "that a year in school would be worth more to the country, even in war time, than a year in military training." "We're moving so fast." Law- ter continued, "developing new weapons and new methods at I such a rale that men would have to unit arn everything they learned in a year a military I training if there is a new war." The resolution came as a part of a general educational demand for "an equal opportunity for schools" and was rtpeated in a specific announcement of policy. Directors of the union gather- ed today to analyze the whole list of resolutions with the idea of designating particular items on which to work during the coming year. Equalization of tax rates to Also Asks Punishment For Hundreds of Thousands In Terror Organizations GERMAN CRIMES LISTED Wounded Vet Heading French Prosecutors Brings Fear to Faces of Defend- ants Guidance (enter For Vets Okayed For East Central East Central State college lias received approved contract for I the establishment of a guidance j center to help returning veterans with their educational problems. The guidance center will open February I. The Veterans' Administration will send the college three full time counselors and some secre- tarial help. These representatives of the i Veterans' Administration will be war veteran who is the trench 1 prosecutor, denounced Hilterism and all it stands for a fervor that brought fear to the faces of Her- mann Gocring and other prison- ers before the international mili- tary tribunal. "Civilization requires from you MacArfhur Warns Against Cutting Forces Too Low By JAMUS F. KING NUEHNUEKO, Jan.. 17. France asked death today for the 22 ring leaders of the Nazi regime and for punishment of hundreds of thousands of members of Gar- man terror organizations. Francois DC Menthon, wounded assisted by three full time faculty members. Professors E. H. Nel- son. T. K. Treadwell and Luther G. Edge will devote all their time to the testing and counseling pro- gram. These faculty members were chosen to work on this project because of their considerable ex- perience in testing programs. Offices for the guidance center will be opened on the second floor of Science Hall. Baby Being Flown On Mile Flight Tiny Australian Rushed To U. S. for Treatment To Save Her Life r.'irl C 1'S dou! :c hap SH II 5 mil.-s of li- bituminous sur- mg, Vmita north. US ea Sill. Otta-.v a 7 n.ili-s of rr- k asphalt, Halt HRISBANE. Australia, Jan., 17, weeks old Cherylenc Helen liobinson, {laughter of a former Kansas sailor and an Australian mother, will begin an II.DOII-mile aerial dash In the United States tomorrow for tieat- ___ .merit physicians hope will save Riodtice revenue for school pur-j her life, poses, passage of a graduated j Kailure of the baby's fontanelle land tax bill to "break up large I opening at the crown of her holdings of land and at the same bead to close normally would time to replace the revenue lost i lead to Cherylene's death within through homestead exemption" fiO days, doctors said, unless were stressed in the educational American specialists could be plank. The farmers approved ft doral rural electrification programs and urged development of river valleys where possible for cheap powi r similar to TVA." They also a ,kcd for expansion of ihi- new federal farm-to.mar- ket road program and expansion _ WASHINGTON. Jan.. 17, Congress received from lieneral Douglas MacArthur today n I warning that any attempt to cut Pacific forces below the .strength contemplated by July 1 would "weaken to a dangerous degree" military controls over Japan and Korea. A cable from the supreme alli- ed commander in the Pacific, contained this warning, was laid before a senate committee by General Dwight D. Eisenhower, army chief of staff. Eisenhower appeared before the special senate military stib- conunittee to explain further the j.... -'I niy's denidblixation policies, after this unleashing of barbar- which he had outlined to an in- ism a verdict which will be a I session of representatives sort of supreme De senators on Tuesday. Menthon said. I At that meeting, Eisenhower "Justice must strike those had said the army strength in guilty of the enterprise of bar- i "'e Pacific theater would be par- barism from which we have just 375.000 by July 1. The escaped. The rein of justice is -H'O.ODO figure used today appar- lently included nn 32- (Itll) who would Alaska and the that date. Eisenhower told the committee he Directed all theater command- ers to "get down to rock bottom" by releasing every possible sur- plus man and Ordered a halt to all mass de- j monstrations by soldiers against demobilisation delays. Directed army inspector gen- erals to visit all army installa- tions and listen to 'individual complaints of all "junior officers and men" who believe they an- not essential and being retained. empty pens in most of the country s stock- yards today as they looked to Washington for Settlement of a paralyzing strike in the meat industry. Leaders of the CIO and AFL unions involved in the huge some Unil.OUO representatives of the four major packers heeded appeals of government to meet in an attempt to rer.ch agre- ement en the wage dispute. One of the unions went to the p-ace talk ready to modify its wage de- mands. As the meeting by pack- ers and labor department officials got I'lKlrrway, the scarcity of mea' bec.ime nciite in many sect-oils as arrival1; of livestock .'.t principal markets dwindled. Currcn Supplies Dwindle Current supplies were snrink- ing rapidly and continuation of the strike, which started Tues- day, threatened to reduce the country's fresh meat supply to far below wartime rationing. Reports from throughout the na- tion indicated supplies probably would be exhausted from within two to days. Going into today's Washington conference, the AFL Amalgamat- ed Meat Cutters and Butchers Workmen, were prepared to set- tle for a wage increase of 15 cents an hour and had urged the CIO United Packinghouse Workers to submit a similar proposal. CIO Holds For Cents The CIO union, however, has held out for a 17 lz cents an hour wage hike immediately, with la- ter negotiations on an additional 7'3 cents, and did not comment on the AFL union's action in lowering its demand. Original demands were for 25 cents an hour pay hikes. Earl W. Jimerson. president of the AFL union, said the offer by packers of 10 cents an hour By IIAKOI.D W. WARD WASHINGTON, Jan., 17. President Truman conferred with The new panel is headed by his steel fact-finding board today Edwin E. Witte, former public ns President Philip Murray member of the national war S. Steel Corp.. President bor board. Other members are Benjamin F. resumed Clark Kerr. chairman of the now! their White House talks on a pos- defunct war labor board's meat sible settlement of the steel wago packing commission, and chief j dispute. justice Raymond W. Starr of the' Tl'e three man fact-finding board met the president a.. 2 p. m. shortly afterward, Murray and Fairless arrived the most exact expression of great human hope. Your decis- ion can mark a decisive state in its difficult pursuit." Organizations Involved be stationed in China area on farm to market lull uidth gravel tuminnus surfac- ate line west to rase, rio-jbl SH' ib. sBn.. _ t'rban Programs Tr.f do not in- any projects but of n-.r.ni'V to be in diflt-ifiit citiiT. on the feder- nty officials said morning that plans .-.re being drafted for Ada's participation in the 19-16 and allocation of urban con- struction funds but that the project plans have not yet been completed Tr.e !''4'5 allocation includes: ADA. Mtisknger. Duiant. McAlester Blaekwell. SIIKMHIO-' I'awi-.mka. SIiMi.ijdO; Woodward Stillwate.-. Bnrtlci-. illf. S.'id.'i.Oiid. a tr.tal on 2 Column 2) JWEATHER tonight and Friday, v.-arm-r except in Pan- handle; ti.night ex- tep: Z'j-ZH Punhanalc. of the soil con.tcrvatiun services activities. Transfer of s u r p 1 u s army equipment to consumers, parti- cularly heavy machinery to "oth- er agencies of government such as the soil conservation service without the use of middlemen taking also was asked. Frnka Says He Has Real Job on Hands TULSA. OKLA., Jan.. 17. Henry Frnka. who built five con- secutive 'bowl teams as Tulsa University's football coach, is convinced he "has a real job on my hands" in attempting to put together a similar machine at Tulane. Just back from a survey trip to New Krnka said he looked over prospects at Tulane. his new assignment, and realized ''ti-.e terrific schedule and the big re-building job there is to be done there." "There isn't much talent orf hand to open with next fall and I only hope we can get things straightened around and on a winning basis in the next couple of years." be added. Frnka will formally take tip his duties at Tulane February reached. The baby and her mother Hew here from their perth home and are due in San Francisco 4f) hours after leaving Brisbane. The child's father, Robert James Robinson of Virgil, Kas has never seen her. Passage for the mother and daughter was authorized by Washington when informed by Rear Adm. C. E. Van Hook, com- mander of United States naval forces in Australia, that the in- fant's best chance for survival was in America. The chief French prosecutor said that perhaps the punishment of hundreds of thousands of men who belonged to such terror or- ganizations as the SS, the SD. the SA and the Gestapo "awakens some objection" but warned: "Without the existence of these organizations, without the spirit which animated them, one would not siiccceed in understanding how so atrocities could have been perpetrated. The sys- tematic war of criminality could not have been carried out by N.izi Germany without th-se organisa- tions and without the men who composed them. "The major Nazi cu.prits line: their orders carried out in div- ers Nazi organization.: v.hicii we asit you to declare criminal in order that each of may be apprehended and punish- (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) was "very inadequate." He said the union was ready to accept an offer of 15 cents and promised normal operations by next Mon- day in all plants where its mem- bers are on strike. The AFL estimated about 70.- 000 of its members had walked out while the CIO claimed its IICI.OOO members strike. Michigan supreme court. Schellenbach will take part in this afternoon's meeting. Kerr is an impartial umpire in the meat packing field and now is on the University of California faculty. Judge Starr is from Grand Rapids, Mich. Witte, who has served at var-, ious times as a member of federal I boards dealing with industrial re-j lations. is a professor of econom- ics at the University of Wiscon- sin. Fail, Will Meet Again on Friday DETROIT, Jan. The Ford Motor Company and the CIO United Auto Workers, two cents apart in their wage dispute, failed to break their deadlock in another session today but will meet acnln tomorrow. Today's session, second of the three previously scheduled for this w e e k. was described as "friendly'1 by participants. After about an hour's discus- sions with Ford representatives, the union group held a caucus over what a spokesman called a "top drawer secret pertaining to wages." He declined to give any details. Abandon were on Korean Issue I'nscttlrd SEOUL, Korr.a. Jan. The American-Russian joint com- mission on restoration of inde- pendence for Korea held its sec- ond meeting behind closed doors in the governor geenral's build- ing today but ;i hoped-for com- ciiniqiie on re-tilts failed to ma- terialize. TI'LSA TO LET HUTMENTS BE SET UP IN CITY TULSA. Okla., Jan. The city commission has agreed to revise zoning regulations suf- ficiently to permit location of some lino army hutments in resi- dential sections for not more than six years. Roy Morgan. Tulsa builder, ac- quired tile surplus army struc- tures for sale to returning sol- diers but soon found that under pifsent ordinances there was no place to put them. Mayor Olney F. Flynn inter- vened nnd the commission will act tomorrow. Shortly thereafter the bargain- ing session was adjourned. The company, whoso offer of a 17': cent per hour boost was rejected by the UAW, was be- lieved to have no intention of in- creasing the amount to meet the cent raise suggested by President Truman's fact-finding board in the General Motors Corp.. wage dispute, n ,A amount was demand- y "C80lia- Instead, informed sources agreed the company would try to gut some definite agreements from the UAW on the matter of com- pany security. Its latest wage offer made last Friday tied the proposed increase in with "work- able agreements with the union" on company security and worker productivity. Meanwhile at Washington nat- ional labor relations board of- ficials termed "unfounded" UAW- CIO objections to the appoint- ment of Gerald D. Reilly us trial examiner in the union's charges against GM of failure to bargain in good faith under the national labor relations act. arrived to reopen their discussions in the White Housu cabinet room. The president's three top labor advisers met with them. These are reconversion direc- tor John W. Snyder, Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach and John R. Steelman, special presidential assistant. None of the principals had any- thing to say about the status of the negotiations. Fairless told re- porters, however, that he had not seen Murray overnight. Mr. Truman's sudden summons of the fact-finding board led to the belief that Mr. Truman might ask an agreement from both par- tics to abide by the board's even- tual recommendation, due Febru- ary 10. President Truman gave the two principals in the threatened steel strike their last chance today to work out .in agreement together before he proposes a way to end, the deadlock. The president gave CIO Presi- dent Philip Murray and Benja- min Fairless. U. S. steel head, until this afternoon to settle their wage dispute. Should they fail, he said, he will step in with "a proposal in the public interest." "Sleep, Pray" Over It Mr. Truman urged the two men, .lust before they left the White House last night after a day of fruitless talks, to "sleep over it and pray over it and do their ut- lo get together and coma again at two o'clock to- Read the Ada News Want Ads. mcr. CHUNGKING. Jan. Chinese authorities in Nanking announcrd today that 2! war- ships were being turned over to China by the United States ami Great by the for- most back morrow afternoon." Both said they would Presidential Press Secretary Charles G. Ross described thi leave-taking. Even Had to Salute Jeeps of Generals On Some Pacific Islands Soldiers Ordered to Salute Even If General Not in It McAlester Man Is Drowned in Slough CLAYTON, Okla.. Jan. highway patrol announced a man identified as Carl Hoffman of McAlester, Okla.. drowned when a car he was driving plunged into a slough one mile south of here. Two high school girls yester- day noticed r. radio aerial pro- truding from the slough and in- formerl police who pulled the ear out. Troopers Jack Larmour and Cecil Snapp said it appeared Hoffman missed the road, went off the shoulder, down a 15-foot embankment and sank under a culvert. Hoffman was last hoard from Monday night. Cop Shoots Srlf T1JI.SA. Okla., Jan. Police C'apt. Harry L. of the department's 'technical divis- ion, accidentally shot himsilf through the hand today. Discharge Speed Up Back Of Some Ry JAMKS MARI.OW WASHINGTON. Jan. Here is a quick look at General Kiscnhower's explanation, given In eiingi ess. for the ai my'.s slow- down in releasing men. 1. The army has released far the war with Japan and Germany it haci planned. 2. If it kept up that rate, it would run out of men necessary to carry out the army's job in Jaoan and Germany. .1. Replacements for those over- seas tiie draft or not been fast enough. The general said: "If we were to continue ship- ping men home at the we reached during the past few months, about April we would have nothing left but a woefully inadequate number of volunteers would literally have 'run out of army.' What Arrr.y Has Done Yet, in order to keep dis- charges to a high rate, tin- gen- eral said the army has done these things: 1. It has made every effort to get Volunteers to erans It has told General MacAr- Ihur in Japan and General Me- Narv in (ieiinimy lo cut their soldier requirements to the hone. It has cut tin- training of new men in this country from 17 to 13 weeks. Why The Excitement He gave this explanation for the excitement over demobiliza- tion: 1. The end of the war started an emotional wave to get men out of the army. 2. The "almost incredible speed" of the war department in releasing men between the defeat of Japan and Christmas. General these figures to show the army's speed in demobilisation and bow it had exceeded its own promises to re- lease men: It had planned to let 000 men Kit between Si-pf. 1 and Dec. :il. Actually, in that time it released -1.KiS.OOO or more (ban its plans called for. Altogether, since Germany fell last May, the army has released of the B..'100.000 men it vet- had at that time. By next July 1 the army will have released .-mother men who were in the army when Germany quit. Thus by next July1 1 the army will have left only 500.000 of the it had in service last May. All the rest will be new draftees or recruits. The general said the speed up of discharges between September and the end of December "un- doubtedly helped create confu- sion by stimulating optimism among srvicemen and their fam- ilies." He added that recruiting 5.000 men today doesn't mean 5.000 veterans can be released low. or next month and for this reason: It takes three to six months to make a soldier of a recruit, ready to step into a veteran's place. He said the shortage of 10- nlaeements now facing the armv is due to the shortage of drafted men and volunteers in the last six months of llt-lS. "Ilecause they did not come in fast enough." the general said, "we must slow down our dis- charge rate." Kerr Stays on To Seek Equipment WASHINGTON. Jan. Gov. Knbert S, Kerr of Oklahoma remained in Washington today to continue his efforts to have con- gress pass pending bills making surplus machinery available to soil_ conservation districts. Kerr yesterday beared approx- imately 100 delegates from 31 states to the White House where he asked President Truman's help in getting the necessary legislation. The- "march on Wash- ington" was promoted by Kerr. No better opportunity ever existed in the history of n gov- ernment to turn swords into Kerr asserted. The governor told a reporter he had not attended to any busi- ness solely for Oklahoma since he arrived here Monday. HO.MMA IS CIIARGKI) WITH DKATII OF JUSTICE MANILA. Jan.. 17, Lt. Gen. Masaharu Homma today was charged with direct respon- ibility for the death of Jose A- bad Santos, former Philippines supreme court chief justice. Salvador Abad Santos, the dead man's brother, told the military commission hearing was crimes charges against Homma that he had been informed by Jose P. Laurel, puppet Philippines presi- dent, that the Japanese eommand- signed the judge's death war- rant and later refused to grant clemency. The largest living animal, the sulphur-bottom whale, attains a "cngth of about 110 feet. Jan. Rees (R-Kas) told house today that Gl's on a small. South Pacific island have been ordered to salute empty jeeps bearing the white stars of gcner- a Is. "I thought the house should Rees said, "that it has gotten to the place where out boys must not only salute officers but their empty jeeps as well Rers declined to say where the order was issued, but read it into the congressional record as fol- lows: "All army vehicles bearing the white star of a general officer will be saluted whether it is oc- cupied by a general or not. The vehicle will be saluted if it pass- i's a soldier on tin- street or if the vehicle is stationary and tin- soldier passes it. Tin- soldier will also salute all officers riding in a vehicle. When saluting, the soldier should turn his head in the direction of the vehicle or officer and look directly at the object of his salute. All salutes should be rendered wholeheart- edly with snap and precision and in a military manner." L TH' PESSIMIST Dob jr. Don't try t' fool folks hv pretendin' t' be something you're can't be done unless your associates 're all morons er idiots. We'd rather remain cold than t' have somebody drop in an' turn on th1 hot air.   

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