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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 16, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 16, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             'Your child would quickly learn to obey if you would reason with asserts a psychologist. You're mistaken, Doctor. What he would quickly learn would be how to Fair tonicht and Thursday; warmer Thursday and west tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 232 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1946 FIVE CENTS THE COPY Would Hold Island Bases Sen. Mognuson Follows Truman Statement With Strong Plea for Keeping Them Torch Deaths Big Mystery May Involve Intro-Army Scandal in Berlin By RICHARD A. O'KEGAN KHANKFURT. Germany, 16, 10-day-old investiga- tion into the mysterious torch murder of throe U. S. military government officers at Passau has been classified as "top sec- ret." A high officer closely associat- ed with the case said- he was un- able to explain why reports on the slaying flowing into theater Believer in Signs By ALEX It. SINGLETON WASHINGTON. Jan. Senator Magnuson (D-Wash ca'.lcci acquisition of scn-.e British-owned island bases :n connection with any loan to Er.ek.nd. headquarters had been given the Macnu'or.'s comment to a re-i u. s. army's highest security classification. Rumors circulated tiiat an ar- rest had been made, but high officers refused to comment. In- stead, the secrecy surrounding the was intensified. One ofliccr unofficially volun- teered the statement that be be- lieved the e-ase might hi; an "in- tra-army scandal." A report said an American officer was under suspicion. Army investigators who have wrapped the entire case I such secrecy that so far not even the names and hometowns of the vic- tims have been announced of- ficially. However, they have porter? came in the wake of President Truman's declaration this country intends to rr- t.itn exclusive control ovi r any .rrn J.-'pane-c inlands it needs for in the Pacific. Tre chief executive told bis conference ycstenlav that rti'.er Japanese ov. ned or man- dated islands will be placed un- der United Nations trusteeship. He added that no decision has Veen reached on what bases '.hi? countrv wants to keep by :t e'.f under exclusive trustec- Navy's Wanted Chain "r. Ti irmaii'? v.oirls biic'Kcd up are-mcnts of Atnerican military ,-ir.d r.aval officials long have urerd prrnancnt development of a r.f island bases from the Aleutians in the north to Manus :n south. The president's assertion also amounted to a virtual directive to the American delegation to the United Nations assembly in Lon- dr-r.. Mr.gnusorj. however, said this cnuntrv fhfiuld co even further r.nw toward getting the bases it needs both in the Atlantic and Pacific and whether they belong to enemv or ally. Maenu.son On "Inside" A lieutenant commander in the r.avEl reserve. Magnuson before rxceirr.ine a senator was chairman of the house naval subcommittee which conducted a secret inquiry with war. navy and state depart- ment officials on this country's New a member of the senate r.aval committee, he said the cucftion of acquiring British bases "essential to our defenses" on a permanent or long- lease- be rais- VISITORS WELCO Photo above suggests that motorist Arnold Anderson, 27, took literally the "visitors welcome" roadside billboard near S-inta Rosa, Calif. This is how his car came to rest at the end of a 259- foot skid. Anderson was cut and bruised, a passenger in the car was unhurt. been unofficially identified as Maj. Everett S. "Cofran of Wash- ington. D. C.. Capt. Adrain 1. Wcsseler of Xew Hochelle. X. Y.. and Lt. Stanley Roscwater of Omaha, Neb. Thermometer Dips To 17, Sunshine To Ease Weather After the thermometer dipped 1 to 17 degrees here during Tues- day night, citizens are ready for some of the warmer weather prc- dieted by the federal forecaster i for Thursday. I Tuesday wasn't warm, either, 1 for the high was only 33 degrees, I permitting much of thu snow to stay Clear sunshine was hav- I ing some effect on the snow dur- I ing Wednesday. The moisture j recorded by the snowfall of Tues- I day morning was .07 of an inch. i The Associated Press reports the forecaster's predictions as clear, crisp weather, perhaps a rd before the i-littlp warmer, today. lean to Britain is approv- ed. "I drm't know why, under the ;nar.. these" bases can't be thrown :r. as r-art of the No Economic Loss To Britain "I wouldn't sucge.-t it if it in- volved an economic loss for Brit- Bjt most e.f them are lo- cst'-d on otherwise barren islands pr.d are of nr> commercial or mil- irarv value to Britain or the em- pire." Magnuson may have an oppor- tunity to present his argument formally on capitol hill within a weeks. Mr. Truman told the newsmen he plans to send con- i nrcs> a special message on the loan shortly after his next Monday combining requirements with his views on the f tatc of the union. Meanwhile, it appeared poss- !e the Am'rican plan fnr ex- rlusive retention of the islands i j: r.eedr. might s'.ir a e'. London over whether it con- Mitu'.es big-power cut- back cjf UNO's ultimate author- v. .________ii _ ___, Patlon Speaks At Stratford Friday Public Invited to Hear President of National Farmers Union will be a big night Stratfoid for G. Patton, Denver. Colo. president of the National Farmers' Union, will there. He is to speak at p. m. ;n tr.e high school auditorium. Paton :s a real personage in farm organization circles. He was invited to the international (inference? at Mexico City. San Krar.cisco; be has conferred with Lie Lite Picsicient Roosevelt sev- rr.-il times and also with Presi- T: uriian Under In.-, leadership, the NFf Las taken the broad view that welfare is paramoun'. that JiCricultural Jiolicv must be keyed lo tr.e welfare of the people as a hole, ar.d that excessive farmer demands are not only "punk re- lations" but ultimate'folly. A native of Kanr.aj, he fcicw up The public is invited to hear CHICAGO. Jan. l6.--'.r -Th.' r-.ecutr.-p council of Sigma Delta I'M. national fraterni- !v. d ye teiday that j F.iris. Ne-A- York', chief Inter national News been elected Elk City was the state's cold- est spot overnight with a mini- mum of S degrees. Altus had Waynoka 11, Guymon and Ok- lahoma City 15. Ponca City IB, Tulsa and Ardmore 21. Snow and drizzling rain ended in the state yesterday. Warmer weather is expected to arrive in the Panhandle tonight, reaching into the south and cast by Thurs- day. Shippers were advised to pre- pare for temperatures of 18 to 22 in the northwest. 20 to 24 in the northeast, and 24 to 21) in the south during the next 24 hours. Seeks (losing 01 Broadway Club County Attorney Petitions For Padlocking of Spot As Public Nuisance White House Slaying Out No Plans Yet for President To Intervene in Packing- house Worker Strike lly Tlir AMnm-lntnl WASHINGTON. Jan. Iti i.Ti-As packinghouse workers through- out the nation went on strike to- day a presidential aide said there were no plans for direct White ouse action. But Eclgar L. Warren, chief of the Federal Conciliation service, told reporters appointment of a fact-finding board in the meat strike was under consideration. Such boards have been appointed in other wage cases either by the president or the secretary of la- bor. Charles G. Ross, presidential press secretary, was questioned at his news conference about the meat strike and the scheduled re- wage talks in the stool dispUfFHl tho'White House his afternoon. Ross said he had no comment on a telegram sent by Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach to the companies anci the heads of the AFL and CIO unions involved in the meat strike, in which a post- ponement of the strike and a re- sumption of collective bargaining hero tomorrow were requested. "Are there any plans for White House action in the meat Ross was then asked. he replied. Schwellenbach's telegram said in part "after consultation with the president of the United States, I invite you to come here Thursday to continue your nego- tiations and to confer with me. and I urge you meanwhile to postpone the work stoppage in the conviction that a settlement can be reached." Hitler Dream Is Revealed Planned for German Speaking People Within 100 Years By N'OLAND NORCJAARI1 NUERNBERG, Germany, Jan., 10, international mili- tary tribunal heard today that Hitler dreamed of creating a na- tion of German-speak- ing people within 100 years and ordered young female domestics brought from the Uk- raine as a step toward that goal. The court, trying 22 top Nazi as war criminals, received this evidence in the record of a secret meeting of Fritz Sauckel with officials of the ministry for oc- cupied eastern territories and the Nazi labor front September 4, 1942. Sauckel. who was in charge of foreign labor, was in the prison- ers' box as-the report was read in prosecution of Martin Bormann, Hitler's aide who is being tried in absentia although many be- lieved he died in the battle of Berlin. The record showed that Hitler wanted the imported women to be from 15 to 35 years old and of appearance suitable for their assimilation by the Germans. To further the scheme. Hitler ordered the suspension of a de- cree forbidding the "illegal bring- ing of female housekeepers into the Reich by members of the armed forces." Truman Gets Steel Leaders Together President1 .Hopeful Solution To Be Reached, Head Off Strike of lljr AMMiM'ltitrtl WASHINGTON. Jan.. 16. President Truman called the threatened steel strike antagon- ists back to the White House to- day for a fresh try to keep the workers involved at their jobs. Wage talks between Benjamin Kairless. head of U. S. Steel Corporation, CIO President Phil-! ip Murray and top administration! advisers were slated to pick up j where they Uift off last Saturday Meat Packers on Strike, With Leaders Agreeing to Confer With Schwellenbach Thursday Oklahoma's Meal Supply lo Become Short in Few Days Packers Over State Not Affected by Strike to Help Keep Meat on Sooner Tables By Prut Oklahoma's meat supply will become short almost immediately as a result of the strike of Truman Hopeful in Steel Disputes j Packinghouse workers at the big Truman Hnfinit.. i Armour and Co. plant at Okla- ference yesterday that he is hope- ful for an end of the General Motors strike on the basis of the fact-finding hoard recommenda- tions which the corporation thus Don Lyon. Oklahoma City, secretary-manager of the Okla- homa retail grocers association, said that most association stores have a sufficient supply on hand Sees Another War far has refused to accept. J" withstand a meat shortage i The president also sought to though this week. The associa- I persuade principals in the meat I packing industry wage dispute to resume bargaining here tomor- row, AFL and CIO union leaders said at Chicago. His lequest through Secretary of Labor Sch- wellenbach, was received too late to head off the- walkout which be- gan at midnight, they said. An AFL official indicated wil- lingness to call a halt and con- tinue negotiations, however. A statement from the CIO was pro- mised later. "Fact" BUI Faces Hard Row Meanwhile, the author of the administration's fact finding bill conccelcd that it was not likely to pass the senate in its present form. Senator Ellender   see drunken persons FO drunk as to be unable to stand up. the petition continues bv stating that some drunks fell around in the Broadway club: arr.ong those attempting to dance' t'-ere. that tlie owner makes no effort to control the drinks there and that it bar, become common i for drunken persons 1o get drunk there and then eel in their cars and attempt to drive awav from the place on State Highwav No. while intoxicated, "all of which is to the great danger of the general traveling public." Crawford slated in his petition that happenings at the Broadway club as such "as to offend and do offend common decency, annoy and endanger the comfort, re- pose, health and safety of a large number of persons who reside near the Bv reason of the happenings at the place, the club is allegedly to him to be a public nuisance. Britain and the United States! wound up their cases against the j 22 defendants in the Nuernberg trials today in the liflth session of! Hie international military tribun- al. The French and Russians now take over the case. The Automobile Manufacturers i Association estimates that at i least 1.1100.000 motor trucks will b- produced during 111 Iti. This i. a per cent increase over the five-year period from 1945 to Boss of Emperor's Purse Forced Out Household Minister Has To Go Under MacArthur's Political Purge Order TOKYO. Jan. al MacArthur's political purpe di- rective todav forced the resigna- tion of Sotaro Ishiwata, imperial household mini-ter who cd the emperor's purse. I Ishiwala. 53, formerly was fi- nance minister under ex-premier Hideki To jo and was reported to have been active in the imperial rule assistance association. He was appointed household minis- ter in i He was the first member of the j emperor's staff forced to resign bv MacArthur's Jan. 4 order for j the ouster of all ultranationalists j from the government. j Viscount Yoshitami Matsuda-: ha. formerly grand master of j ceremonies at the palace, suc- ceeded Ishiwata. Another member of the imper- ial household. Kiehi Kido. re- signed as lord keeper of the j privv si'al some time ago and the office was abolished. He subse- quently was arrested as a war i crimes suspect. Those events occurred, however, before Jan. 4 housccleaning order. Meantime. Nosci Abe, new ed- ucation minister, said tbem Jap- aniM- government should make clear to the nation its attitude on the controversial emperor sys- tem. J. W. Siner Dies, Funeral Thursday Succumbs at Valley View Hospital Tuesday Night J. W. Siner, who died at the Valley View hospital Tuesday night at was born March 25, 1873, at Sweetwater, Tennessee. Later he moved to Texas. At the age of twenty-three he married Mrs. Callie Wall. To this union one child was born, Mrs. M. K. Can- of Fort Worth. After the death of Mrs. Siner he married Mrs. Wright in 102-1. To this union a daughter was born, Wil- da Mae Siner of Ada. Of his first marriage there wore two stepsons, Clifford and Char- ley Wall of Fort Worth. Also an orphan child was raised, Miss Bessie Oliver of Jacksonville, Fla. Of the second marriage there were two step-sons, Fred and John Wright and fou.- step-dau- ghters, Mrs. Braden Rhoades, Mrs. N. P. Jones, Mrs. Charles Rush- ing and Mrs. Pete Flatt, all of Ada. He had grandchildren, Miss Callie Carr of Acomita, New Mexico, and Pvt. ivl. E. Carr, Jr., and eight step-grandchildren, all of Ada. Funeral services will be held at Criswell's at a. m. Thurs- day, burial at Ruff cemetery. Officiating will be Rev. Chester Mason, and Rev. V. A. I'endleton, Ada, and Rev. C. B. Clemens. Ft. Worth. Pall Bearers will he T. B. Weatherford, Albe t Canady, Don Westmorland. Homer Kuykendall. Leo Scarhrough and Tom Grant; honorary pall bearers: Jess Tea- gue, Clyde. Kaiser, Al Nichols J. O. Abney, J. C. Walker and Joo Beck. but said their own packing plant in Duncan will help to tide the stores over. He adeled, however, that if the strike was not settled soon, a meat shortage is imminent throughout the state. Chickasha Feels Safe Reports from Chickasha, said that city's fresh meat supply would not be greatly affected, although the cured meat supply is expected to dwindle. One Chickasha packing house said it could handle local fresh meat demands, while Approaching End Oi Draft Law Muddles Army Replacement WASHINGTON, Jan., 16. The uncertain life of the present draft law posed a new complica- tion today in the already diffi- cult task of finding demobiliza- tion replacements for the army. Influential members of the house military committee disclos- ed that they are ready to let selective service die on May 15 day the existing law is to expire unle-ss congress again ex- tends it. Meatless Diet For Much of Nation Is In Prospect Soon Plants of Major Meat Firms Being Picketed; Some Violence at Kansas City CHICAGO. Jan. nationwide packinghouse work- ers strike involvini; work- ers, threatening a meatless diet lor the nation, began today but union leaders agreed to confer tomorrow in Washington with Secretary of Labor Schwcllcn- bach in government efforts to halt the walkout. Lewis J. Clark, president of the CIO United Packinghouse Workers Union, said he and the union's general counsel. Ralph Helstein. would go to Washing- ton. Clark's spokesman, how- ever, said the strike was in full force with all its mem- ber.'; out in 140 plants across the nation. Previously Earl W. Jimerson, president, and Patrick E. Gor- man, secretary of the AFL amal- gamated meat cutters and butch- er workmen, proposed to the CIO that both unions hetd the last minute plea by Schwellenbach and "postpone continuation" of the strike. Appeal Came Too Late The AFL pointed out, however, that Schwcllenbach's appeal last night caino too late to avert the strike which had been called for midnight and began promptly, in some instances even before the deadline. There was no Immediate: esti- mate from the AFL as to how many of its members actually were out but were involv- ed. today, and 30.000 more later. Another (iO.OOO AFL mem- bers in the retail trade ivcre not dircctlv involved. Spokesman for major packing companies made these estimates today of the number out on strike nationally: Armour and Company, 35.000: Cudahy. 10.000 Wilson and Company" Swift and Company, to 16.- 800. The CIO spokesman said struck in re- plants included (hose of Armour, falling Cudahy, Swift, Wilson, and fiva The army has been relying j Swift and to' largely upon the draft for recruits (iOO. to replace the ciamormg long- The CIO spokesman said struck service GI's overseas, but cent months, it has been short of meeting the said it could take care of its reg- ular customers but could not ex- pand its service. Many stores to any concessions by either of there do their own butchering. the disputes. At Ponca City, four killers in The renewed talks still center-1 addition to independent packers ed em the CIO's demand for a 20 cents an hour wage increase and U. S. steel's counter publicly announced as 15 cents. Murray, at Mr. Truman's re quest, postponed the strike last Saturday, but the White House reported then that "concessions" had been made bv both sides. average smaller concerns, Morrell. Kine- anothcr monthly induction requirements 1 an and Company. Cudahv Broth- of men. i ers. Rath Packing and Tobin Could Be Abrupt Change Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower told demobilisation conscious p-irtment Iris ordered th-ii bv Government conciliators who ii June 30 all'men with two years etforls here this "lot service or -10 points must be stnke Pro' out of the army o'r on Iheir way j >f 11 Oil 1.) Oil 111 (Ml II ill lit TO I _____. Contracts Awarded For Highway Work Highway Commission An- nounces Awards on Three State Jobs I'ON'O CHF.KK, Jan.. Hi, '.v Mrs. Helen Mc.Mahan, (ill, widely! known Oklahoma poetess, died in an Knid hospital yesterday. Mrs. McMahan had been a Grant county resident since and had lived in Mcdford and Lamount before moving to Pond ('reck. She was a member of the Oklahoma federation of women's rlubs and chairman of its litera- ture department for many years. .She is survived by her hus'haml, M., and two sons, Lee, of Man- gum. Okla.. and Henry, of Niles, Calif. Funeral services will be held here at p. m. tomor-l row. j KANSAS CITY. .Ian, Ifi. Mr. and Mrs. George Cortcz, who moved here recently from Sedalia, Mo., are wondering to- day about Susie, their so-called watchdog. When they returned from din- ner last night they found the doorlock had been broken. A careful check showed rob- bers had taken: 30 pillow slips, 15 sheets, 12 Susie. Military air fleets totaling planes will be required for national security in the United States, according to George H. Woodward of Westinghouse Elec- tric. Report on State of Nation, Budget Message to Con- gress at Same Time OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan, Ifi. on construction of WASHINGTON. Jan., Ifi, three projects were awarded yes- r President Truman is going to let terday by the state highway com- mission. The projects, on which bids were received last month, and successful bidders were: Pittsburg county. US 0.5 miles grading, drainage, beginn- ing in Savanna and extending southwest, W. E. Logan and sons. Muskogee, for Pittsburg county, US 00, 5.6 miles of grading and drainage, beginning two miles southwest of McAlcstcr and extending southwest lo Savanna. W. E. Lo- gan and sons. S 124.06H. Jackson county. SII 44, 5.6 miles of grade, drainage, gravel base and one bridge, one half south- west of Crela southwest into El- dorado. Mullimx Contraction Co., Order Goes Out To Charge Nickel OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan., Ifi. you're one of the thous- ands who hates lo pay 10 cents every time you phone from a hotel room, you'll be pleased at the following: The corporation commission ers. Rath Packing Packing Companies. Conciliators Made Bid George A. Eastwood, president j of Armour and Company, said atBlackwell. Enid and Perry, oxl >-v conciliators pect to supply ample meat to fill demands in that area, with no shortage seen for two or three "i i ;to to 35 cents a hundredweiRht W Normally, three fourths of Abrupt .termination, of the draft prices on civilian meats be rais- ed in to' 12'i cents a hundrcd- r.es. leaving them dependent'on "suih'nc the proposal the success of the regular army s n .ense recognition of enlistment program. The reason members of the! house military committee are' ready to let the draft law die is! that they hope thereby to sal- vage the bogged down universal training legislation requested by President Truman. j Trained Keservc Is (ioal Ponca City's meat comes from law on May 15 local packers who, with plenty the major source of replacements of livestock available, could step for those in later release catcgo up slaughtering if necessary. Truman to Combine Pair of Messages congress have both barrels at report on the state of the union and the annual budget message. lie intends lo combine them in a single document something believed unprecedented and send it to Capitol Hill Monday. Originally Mr. Truman had planned to send the state of the union report to congress on Thursday and follow up with the new budget next week. But he said he eamo to the conclusion after much study that one message would serve as well as two. was "in the fact that the industry cannot raise unless the added is n covered through the medium of higher ceiling prices on Eastwood said Armour's had found it necessary to reject the proposal. He sail! Armour's I indicated the plan would provide Although Mr. human s mill- ntilv enough money to enable a tary training proposals preclude wage increase of 4 cents an hour, use of trainees as overseas re- whereas tin- unions demanded 25 placements, the members .cents or 17' i cents immediately told a reporter they believe the' and negotiation on the other well trained reserve created by the program would reduce neces- sity for the large standing army now planned. Meanwhile three senators tackl- i I'd the task of finding some way to speed the return to civilian 0. C. Will Aggie Champions OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan.. 16. Oklahoma Aggies' Sugar Bowl champions will be feted at "Aggie Day" here Friday by the chamber of commerce. "Next lo the musical comedy Oklahoma A. M. performance in tin- Sugar Bowl created a more favorable nation- al impression of Oklahoma anel brought wider recogni'.lon lo the state than anything else in recent ordered Southwest Bell Tele- j Henry Browne, co-chair- phonc Co.. to show at a hearing j man of the chamber'.: sports and February 21 why Ibe 5-cent rale recreation committee, said, lor calls in hotels should not be The Cowboys and the'r coaches enforced. will arrive iii Oklahoma City ;n Complaints have been made to jibe morning, attend a luncneon. the commission because of the j a movie, a reception and a ilin- 10-cent outgoing charge when the; ner dance They will be present- ordered rate is cents. ed certificates expressing tip- preciation of the city and stale Automobile manufacturers their football feat's, out trucks for the army from lo the end of the war. Greater returns fijr amount in- News Classified Ads P. Eisenhower, army j the face of the approaching staff, the three-member' life of some fed up servicemen who have been chor- using "we want to go home." Apparently unconvinced by de- mobilization data from Gen. Dwight chief of senate inquiry group requested further information todav from acting secretary of war Kenneth C. Royall. "Our only purpose is lo try ami clarify this cnliic situation." Senator Edwin C. Johnson (D- Colo.) chairman of the special military affairs subcommittee, .said in an interview. "We are wide open for facts but we want to tall: cold turkey and put everything on top of the table. We are not Iryim; to fry anybody but we do have some questions." NO MOUK MASS MEETINGS IN KTO WITHOI'T PERMISSION KRANKKURT. Germany. Jan. ie._i.1i_Grll. Joseph T. McN'ar- nev announced that no more mass demonstrations by Ameri- can soldiers would be permitted in the European theater without the express authority of military commanders. "The mass meetings of soldiers permitted without interference because of confusion and appar- ent misumle: .standing in the minds "f many men regarding the problems of redeployment have servi d their purpose." the theater commander in chief said in instructions issued to nil ma- jor officers. i! 2 cents. HOR- Receipts nrop Fast An early indication of the ef- fects of tin- strike was the report from 12 leading midwest live- stock markets that hog receipts todav totalled onlv com- pared with in the same markets a week ago. Livestock producers for days have been sharply calculating their shipments to market in Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Adi TH' PESSIMIST 117 lloti Jr. f Next t' ownin" a home, nn- thin' gives a feller such a leelin' o' security an' satis- faction as be-in' able t' hand "mi to 'im. when th' doctor asks t' see 'is teeth. If your credit is good don't further questions will be asked.   

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