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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 15, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             K. ,0 ,o rousing fight, Mm( Tartly elmidv anil slightly teileli-r; lou tf-m- prrjturrs in middle 2U's E ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, JANUARY Eisenhower Presents Discharge Schedule as Army Now Has It FIVE CENTS THE COPY Congressmen In Show-me Mood On Demobilization Frankly Skeptical Army-Navy Chiefs Can Quiet Uproar; Bill Setting Up Requirements for Discharge Involved By Ull.MAM II. AltHOGAST WASHINGTON. Jan. 15.- galheicd for a top c'imti-.aiiel e-xplanation eif army- ion pedii-v today, v.itn legi-lators tr.mkiy (k'.ptical uhet.'irr it would quiet at anei abreiael. Senators and rt-pres'.-ntative-s crossed street to the- congres- i linrarv to m'-et with Dw-il-.t D. Ei-e-nhow.-r Ael- Cne.-ter W. the airrv ar.d r.avv of staff. Manv eif the lawmaker.; ,'aiel frankly in ad-. ;.n  mcllify the- GIs civilian'. votviv. in t e ce.ngie-..-ieinal el. e-tiem j have- b--.-n cicliiging Capitol with cables and let- ters sir.ee- the re-cent dc-mobiliza- tion slowdown. Chairman PrssimUtic i Chairman Rankin of the hoii-e veteran? committee de- clared that he doubted whether "a suitable explanation of this cnn be rr.r.de." Hi.- pefsi- rnism was echoed by other legis- lates. A likely emte'ome- eif the- appearance-, Itank- m teilel reporte-rs. might be- aeleli- tional strength feir his drive te) fence congressional actiem on dej- legislation. The- Mississippian is author a bill to re-quire; the- armed serv- ices tei discharge any man with twei more years eif se-rviee-. with a wife- eir chilelren. with a de-pi-nelrnt parent, eir who le> e-ducatiein inte-i-rupte-cl liv war elutv. Itill Stue-k in Ceimmltle-e The- bill is stymie'd in the- heiuse military but if house members sign a peneling petition, n eiuick house vote would be in order. There- are an estimate-d ISO signatures now, After today's session with the i Tells Who'll Be Oul by April 30 And by July 1 Warns, Too, That Organi- zation Will Collapse If Demobilises Too Fast Snow and Rains Soak Almost All Parts of State Overnight Ada Shares Borh Rain ond Snow; Serious Drought In Southwestern Oklahoma Relieved by Heavy Fall of Snow By the Associated Press Heavy snowfall, ranging up to five inches, broke a ser- ious drought today in southwestern Oklahoma while in other sections of the state soaking rains were welcomed by farmers. The snov.-storm continued in the southwestern section ar.d early today i: was so heavy it had closed U. S. Highway Aldridge First To Turn in Yardstick Filled With Dimes Hv WII.MA.M K. ARBOfiAST WASHINGTON. Jan. n. Dwight D. Kisrnhower told congressmen today that by April every enlisted man with 45 points or TiO months service will be emt of the army or on the way to separation centers. By July 1 he said, every en- li--te'diman with 40 pemits or two vears' .service- will be out in the- preicess eif being discharged. At present, flo points anel three anil a half years' service are re- ejenre-el fen- discharge-. Furthermore. Eisenhower as- sured an informal meeting of senators anei representatives at the congressional library, "every surplus man will be out right away unless his points arc so arn-.v chief of staff and the 'chief that llL' can rcPlaco someone of naval operations, nankin pre- (Continueel on Page 2 Column 3) vet throughout the land are slndnr the "Wardrobe Blues" oa they run up the draatlc short- are of civilian clothlnr. Karl Zltron and Jack Warfel, two re- sourceful Cleve- land. O.. vets pictured at rltht, solved their problem br havlnr their G. I. transformed Into a flnrertlp lenrth awaner coat and a navy blue dress over- lest than apiece. Coats were shorn of brass buttons, shoulder straps and back belU and riven a rood dye job. Zltron's short coal was riven smart rows of stitch- In t around the bottom. How tojpermlitarize' Your Gl Togs r ASdriclge ;n A'ia to tin .'ill'-ei v. ith dm r.ot be opened clear.--, n no queita set but cniintv that half lei. e.-i will remain while- th" either eirgan- useel for Infantile- Paralv- sbock Ireiops of polie) Tii-v stand readv at .1 give every possible :7-.cdical and health tei funels. ar.d and wherever needed. r the past year nccomplishe-rl nf- ,H- I! e.f county OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan 15 Marv Mor.tge.merv invalid, was burned tei dc.-pite efforts of her hus- The v.'i-.en their l-.usband. A. min- etu? .Ne amount in- C'.a.-sified Ads iWEATHERl m mmmmm____________ cloudv to- :iay; sliahtly es in inid- -'I in Pan- e d n e s d a y v, e.-t and Jan. 15-1R Ka n s a s. Oklahemia _ Neiira-ka in l rastin ar.d we-tern Kansas em nnel of district Thurs-lav: Friday eir Sat- urdav; warme-r Sunday; te-mne-r- aliire-.: avi-rai-ing ne-ar eir slightly .e or n" pre-c-i- except light rain or snow Jr. Oiil-hcn-.a Saturday. between Klk City and Sham- ruck, Tex., the state highway patrol reported. AUA I liamfall hen.' during the early part of the night chang- ed to snow; exeept for streets and walks, the landscape was covered with moist snow by dawn. After a pause, snow fell again for a time. Slush underfoot constituted the mn.-t unattractive result of the but without iee the elnving was only mi Idly Tempeiatuics ranged fiom Monday's 11 high to a low eit degrees. Meire snow was forecast for the area by the federal weather buieau, with storms ending in other sections during the.' day 1e> make way for winds 'and lower temperature's'. Shippers were warneel to pre- pare- for temperatures from Ifi to in the northwest. 111 to 22 in the northeast and 22 to in the semthwest southeast elur- ing the next 2-1 heiurs. Heaviest At Elk City _ Heavie. t snowfall was at Klk City, when- live inches blanket- ed the ground and meiie was fall- inu'. Heibart ii'pented a four inch blanket and similar reports rame1 from the of the parched southwestern area. Twe> inches of sneiw fell at Altus.. _ Heavic'st rainfall centered in: the area where it was meist need- cd. Greatest rainfall reported otficially was inches at Hol- i lis. in the southwest, i The moisture- diel not extend into the northwestern wheat and range area where- would be welcome, but there were light' i rains in that a fe-w days' to revive small grains and i Area eif he-aviest rain and snow fall was almost confined to the .-outlnvestern fourth, but it was in the' southeast, and the storm was moving in that direc- tion, southwestern points reported the sne.w I At Ardmoi'e. in the- south, the're- was a rain and the mer- cury stood at !I2. i StreiiiK U'inds Due I In the- central section, the mer- cury was expccte-d te. Kf, ,U) higher than abemt during the (lay. dipping 22 early teunor- rei'.v. Oe-casiemal light snow u-as expee-te-d, then the' oleiuds were- te. break away under fresh te> stiemg niMtherly A total of aii inch of m, fell at Oklahoma City. Oftie-ial measurements shenvcd an me'i of snenv there. In disclosing the April 30 and July 1 coals, the army chief of staff excluded volunteers from the- discharge provisions and made plain that the points are tei he cr.mnuteel on the basis of last Sept. 2. Eisenhower went before the me-rtmg to offer the army's ex- planation of its demobilization system, the target of criticism by ceingressine-n anel GI's alike Warns of "Collapse" Eisenhower warned that the army s organization "will col- lapse" if it demobilizes too fast but pledged that every man eli- gible for discharge by July 1 will be out of service by that time-. I Eisenhower said it was not' P-'.ssible to discharge all men with two years' service by March -0 as originally contemplated I "It would mean that another men would be out on thai beyond our cxpecta- l Eisenhower said. "It would mean such' a com- I Plete re-scramble of our occupa- tional forces as to jeopardize the 'requite of months of work in I bnngimr order out of chaos I Make-. Flat Promise I Explaining the army's elcmo- 1 bihzation policy at an informal senate-house meeting at the con- gM'-siemal library, the chief of I staff declared that the recently announced sleiweleiwn in elf mo- was necessary to pre- i ve-nt the- army frenn being ele- pie te-d by March 1. Hul. even with the sleiwdeiwn he saiel: "Tlie-re is who is tei In Area Youths Fear for 192 Win at Denver Men in Mine Delegates Of U. S. Divide Over Policy Split Over Putting Ameri- can-Conquered Jap Islands Under UNO Sovereignty Paoli, Lindsay, Maysvillc, Scminole Club Youths Take Many Sfoekshow Honors Tremendous Blast Leaves Fate Unknown; 75 Some- how Escaped Alive neit a single man discharged by July he> won't be; discharged by July 1." He- pre-faceel his remarks with a flat statement that demobili-1 is tie-el in with the war department's sponsorship of uni- ve-rsal military training or with any de-sire of high ranking offi- ce-is Id re-tail their positieins Seune cemgrcssmen and Eome 01 s have suggested such might be- the- case. Siie'h conclusions. Eisenhower asse-rted. are "utterly false." Kisenhower saiel that of gene-ral officers on duty on already have he-en are- he-ing re-due-eel in rank or separated frenn the service. .Many Seilems Mstsn The- meeting, in the Ceiolielge auditorium of the library drew i appi eiximately 200 senate and house me-mbers whose complaints about demobilization led to the extiaorelinarv session. j There were fewer than 50 con- gressmen seated when Gen. Ei- srnhenver. Admiral Chester Nim- chief of naval operations, and score army anel navy arrived at 10 o'cleicki but ttie-v began pouring in a little late'r. Eisenhower, wearing a field iaeket, greeted the congressmen with a big smile, and then walk- eel te> the center of tho stage, awav fremi the microphone. He re-turne-d to the instrument after several persons lauchincly shout- eel "back to the mike, Ike." The loudspeakers also were connected te> a large adjoining reiom whe-re- a group of army anel navy enlisted men sat. 'Only members eif congress, ncwspaper- me-n, anel members of Gen. Ei- senheiwe r's and Adm. nartv were admitted to the aud- itorium. DENVER, Jan.. 15. homa produced two gran d champions last night in compe- tition with lamb and swine ex- hibitors from the Rocky Moun- tain area, continuing a three-year sweep of top places in the nation- al western livestock show. Bill Strom, Oklahoma A. M. freshman and Noble county 4-H club member, exhibited the grand champion lamb of the show with a southdown, champion of the junior division. Harry Bivers, Freelcriek FFA youth, won the grand champion barrow title with a Chester White. Billy and Richard Mochlc, Gar- field 4-H club members, won sec- ond place in the open class Lambs and had the third place heavy wether. Other winners from Oklahoma: Duroc Jersey lightweight, Bcty Jo Kissier, Paeili, first and secejnd; medium. Joe Baker Lindsay, first: Harry Bivers third; heavy. Forest Nail. Se-m- meile 4-H, second. Pen Durocs Joe- Baker, Lindsay, first. Har- ry Bivers. first; Bill Parker, Se-m- ineile FFA, second. Medium Bill Harrick, Eniel 4-H, first; Tom Dil- lingham, Wnukomis, 4-H fifth Heavyweight. Bill Bnrriek. third; Gene Cook. Scminole FFA. fifth. Champion Hampshire, Bill Bar- rick. Berkshircs lightweight, Tom Oillingham. Poland Chinas light weight, Orr, Maysville-, first anel sec- i miners ond. Heavyweight, Bellow, Seminole FFA, second. Pen of' Peilands, Roy Orr, second. Chester Whites lightweight, Harold McGregor, Maysville 4-H, first and second. Harry Bivers, first; Harold Me- Gregeir, second. Pen Chester Whites. Harold McGregor, first.' Champion Chester White, Harry Bivers. Reserve champion, liar- old McGregor. I In the Angus open class, Angus' Valley farms, Tulsa, won fifth in two-year-old bulls. Third in summer bull, ninth and eleventh senior bull, and fifteenth junior bull calf. WELCH. W. V.V. Jan. 15.   ceial miners mir- aculously escape-el alive today after a tremendous blast in the No. fl Havaeo mine on the out- skirts of Welch, but the fate of others: was in doubt as res- curers inte) the smoke and dust-filled shaft workings. E. L. Chatfield, an inspcctor-at- large of the state mines depart- ment, saiel he- was informed that men were in the workings when the exposition occured a- ruunrt a. m. I The force- was so terrific that negre) pupils in a school house By JACK SMITH LONDON, Jan., 15, cial seiurces disclosed today that American civilian anet military official.) at the Uniteel Nations general assembly were split over whether American conquered Japane-se- Islands should be plac- ed under UNO sovereignty. The delegates themselves were said to favor a trusteeship plan feir the Pacific Islands, while their special military Gen. George C. Kenny, argued that the United should re- lain any islands of military value. Delegates saiel that if Kenne-y lielel eiut the disagreement could considered as tantamount to an issue between -the state and ivar departments and would have tej be referred to President Tru- man for settlement. Won With American Blood Kenney, chief of the Pacific air staff, could not be reached immediately for comment. Pre- viously expressed American mhtary opinion, however, was that the United States should not run the risk of having to recon- quer Islands won with American bleieid. On the other hand, officials said that the state department argued that the United Staos hael agreed t'> preliminary trusteeship plans during the San Francisco con- ferene-c and should not set a n.'c- cedcnt for others by withholdin" the Inlands. Formation of trusteeship poli- cies was one of the ma'o.- tasks awaiting the assembly, which re- mained adjourned today until 4 P ni. (10 a. m. Central time) to allow time for commit- tee-meetings. Under the truste- eship plan, one nation or a Rioup of nations would administer ter- rito.ies placed under UNO trol. Quick Action Sought call for quick action on Electrical Workers In 16 States Go On Strike Over Wages Walkour Hits Planti Producing Most of Nation's And Industrial Electrical Appliances; President Of Union Says Strike Fully Effective at All Plants NKW YORK. Jan. in. i Two hundred thousand electrical workers in ]f! states from Massa- chusetts to California struck to- day auainst three c n in p a n i e s which produce the major part of the. nation's home and industrial electrical appliances. Albert J. Fitzgerald, interna- tional president of the CIO United Electrical Workers, an- I nounccd at 1) a.m. (est) that the walkout in plants of General El- ectric, Westinchemse and General Motors was "100 per cent effect- ive, according to all bulletins re- ceived at UK national headquar- ters up to that time." U'unirn Takin? Tart Fitzgerald said women and salaried and white collar workers were among who left their jobs. He said this was the largest number of wom- en to strike in recent years. Women and white collar work- ers will be represented in picket lines, he said. The union president declared the walkout was 100 per cent ef- fective at H n in. In planti at Philadelphia and Pittsburgh Pa Lynn ami Springfield. Mass.. Scheneclady, N. Y.; Hloonifield. Newark and Jersey City. N. J. and Dayton, O. A total of '.'8.000 workers are employed in these plants. Blame Put On Corporations International headquarters of the union announced shortly af- ter 0 a.m. that "the walkout be- gan on schedule.'1 (Fitzgerald said: I "because of the refusal of tho General Klcclne, Wr.stinghciuvt and General Motors corporations te> grant tin- union's S2 n day wage demand. employes have been compelled to go on strike." The strike involved a major Dart of the nation's production of home and industrial electrical appliances. At Schenectadv. K. Y.. more than 16.000 production workers (Continued on Page 2 Column 3) AFL Strike Ordered Against Six ol Large Meal Packers Begins at Wednesday; Federal Conciliators Still Trying to Halt Strike Called by CIO Packing Workers CHICAGO, Jan. A.F.L. Meat Cutters union notified its 500 local units today to strike at A. M. Wednesday against six large meat packing companies. con- the and workers in the store anel of-I question was expect- fice of the ne-w river and to made by British Foreign hontas Ccmseilidated Ceial com-1 Secretary Ernest Bcvin on the pany, from 500 to 1.000 feet away, I of tnp assembly this week were injured by shattered glass i l'urinR the Renernl policy debate, and debris. The mine is opcra't-' >I'llt'rc was some disagreement ed by New River and Pueahontas amonK tnp American delegation i 400 Tect Deep 11S ln exactly how much control Unofficial estimates saiel fromltllc United State.; would lose if a third to one-half eif those com-1 to United Nations sov- fremi the- mine alive walked rrc'RrUy over the Pacific Islands. Some sources saiel it was unlikely that the delegation would propose a trusteeship semi- Protest Leads To Scrap in Office Two Face Police Court Charges After Trouble noistuie State Attorney Claims to Be Author As the storm meiveel eastward the- e forecast for Okla- calle-el fm- meiic meiisture hy Saturelay. It e'all-d for wann- e-r by I hur.-day, anel eoeiler Kri- day anel Saturday, v.illi rain en- snow Satin day. ln Ketieral tempi-ratures will be ne-ar eir slightly above normal, the eost saiel. Official rainfall reports ine-luel- e-d Aielme.re- .71, Klk City 1 Kind McAle-ste-r Tulsa a trace. There was no moisture at, (Continued on Page 2 ColumnT) OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan., 15, in a suit filed by Howarel K. Berry, Oklahoma City attorne'.v who claims to he the ghost-author the life story of Moman Pruie-t, famed criniinal lawyer who died decently, today- was se-t for Friday in the court eif District Judge Clarence Mills. Berry's pe-tition asked appoint- ment ejf a receiver te> prevent eiis- ruption of the publication and sale- eif the book during pendency eif the suit. Montreal is situated on the St. Lawrence river. Lewis and Herman Goodpns- tuie. brothers who live west of Roff, were arrested Monday and phiccei in city jail disturbance. They were released and will ap- pear back feir a hearing in police court Wednesday morning. The men. who were recently discharged from the service, went to the U. S. Employment office and were questioneel the way the USES respemdee! to their inquires. They first talked with erne- the girl employees of the office anel the manager anel another man in the office heard the dis- turbance went over te> find out what the trouble was all about. A fight resulted from the quarrel, according to city who in- vestigated the case. One policeman said thnt one of the brothers was able te> appear in police court Tuesday. The manager of the local USES office was not available Tuesday for a statement. He was attend- ing to office business in Pauls Valley. FORT GIBSON. Jan.. 15. Mi- Mrs. Vina L. Stanford, (17, die-el in a fire which destroyed lier farm home. returns for amount in- News Classified up the shaft steps, which some- how remaine-el intact the tipple- appe-aie-el te) be- a wreck. The; shaft is about feet deep. Ollu-is hael to be helped or elracce-el from the- mine1, anel seime eif tlicm appe-an-d te> eonscious frenn sheicU. Hospitals eif Welcli. a e-ity of 7.- 000 peipulalion anel the- "county seal of the- bituminous coal preidue-ini: eeiunty in 'the Unite-el States, were- qiiie-lcly fill- e-el tei overfleiwiin; with injured anel clulelie-n frenn the scheiol house- bv the blast Edward Mullins and liis son James, who apparently were not hurt, teilel newsmen they were the first te> reach the; surface from the inner-workings. Smeild-, llust Intrrfcrrd The father saiel tln-y were- at work one mile- frenn the- shaft in No. 3 entry when they heard the blast anei imme-eliately started running. They saiel the Weirkinfis im- mediately he-came so dark from smoke anel elust that they had to stoeip over and train their lights on the steel mine rails in order te> find their way to the open- ing. Two mine inspectors Kd Chaf- fm and Walte-r White-, anel volunteers were among the first to enter the mine after the dis- aste-r. Neither mini- officials nor res- cuers hurriedly aysembled would speculate; on the fate of others they called "the dip" entry, hut still unaccemnteel feir. The Mullinses saiel the1 arrangement with- out stipulating that the United State-s alone shotilei act as con- trolling agent feir the UNO. Unele-r an agreement such ns that, the Unite-el Nations would have- Seivereicnty over the Is- laneis and the United States would have immediate cemtrol them. De-legates saiel the state clepait- me-nt could he expecteel to adhere the- policy eif not asking feir the Unite-el States any special com- mercial privileges in trustee ter- ritories she controlled. Identify Plclure Of Holdup Suspect M P Employes Soy It'i Of Man Who Robbed Store in Daylight Raid "Every effort on the part of our international officials to avoid a nationwide meat packing strike has been unsuccess- the union officials said in telegrams to the locals. "The offers thus far made by the large packers cannot possibly be accepted. They are grossly inadequate." The telegrams went out as government conciliators prex-eed- I ed with last minute conferences with union and management of- ficials te> halt the strike, ally called by the CIO Packinghouse Workers. Tho CIO uniem claims the AKI, 135.000. Strike At Big Planti Tile AFI. officials said 75.009 members of their union would strike at plants eif Armour A: Company: Swift Company; I Wilson Company. Cuelahy I Packing company: Kingan Pack- ing company. Indianapeilis, anet John Men i ell company. Ottumwa, New Jap Minister To Ask MacArthur To Ease Directive origin- United By RUSSELL BRINES TOKYO. Jan. Mitsuchi. Japan's new home min- ister, saiei today he intended to ask for modificatiein of General Mae-Arthur's political purge di- rective-, then went te) the palace and to Kmpe-reir Hiro- hito the.- heiuse-cleatiing emler. Mitsuchi, newly appointed key minister in Premier Kijuro Shi'- dehara's reorganized cabinet, told the Associate-el Press he woulel suggest modification the direc- tive to "make it more applicable te> the situation.'' He asserted that it disqualified some members of tho diet "whe> actually were op- posed te> war" while "failing tei touch n lot groups responsible i sanitary condition." "Our internalion.il union is ob- ligated that the-re shall be no spoilage eif perishable prnducls." the- tele-grams saiel. "All such perishables must be cared for anel the pre-mises as well as the must be left in a Employees eif the local M. and P. Grocery Monday identified a picture of a man who is believcel te> be the person who forced the manager of the store to put all the bills from his cash register seime into a sack last Tuesday after- noon. Chief Dud Lester said that he was not ready to an- nounce the name of the tnan who is suspected of thc crime unless he is captured. The suspect is said to have been involved in some gun play sheriff at Eufaula. The for war propaganda He declined to discuss the con- tents of his report to the throne. It followed by a few hours the first meeting eif the reorganized cabinet anel pri'sumably included results the ministers' discus- sion of the government's major immediate problems. Mitsuchi said it had not been determined how many officials might be elroppeel from office as a result of MacArthur's purge di- rective, but "if applieel broadly, it will affect a large number." A few hours earlier, he said he intended to change Japan's 47 prefectural governors "as early as possible." blast ap-1 with pearcel te> have centered in what i sheriff tolel locafauVhori'tics that mere- was no official information the man was shot hov hack that wenild have the buttemi of the been from shaft. Mine department in- (licate-d that in normal operations Navace> mine. leicate-el abeiut the one-half mile southe-ast eif Welch" employs arounel 501) men. .-____. PAX-AM ri.AIMIXfi NEW PLANE RECORD NEW YORK. Jan. Pan American Airways officials claimed a ne-w commercial i toelav fen- one. their Lcckheed ceinste-IIatiem plane's which yes- terday fle-w from New York to Bermuda anel distance five heiurs and The initial flight shaved an hemr anel minutes eiff the- pre- vienis record, the- officials saiel. The conste-llatiein flew from La Guardia field. New York, to Kmelle-y Fie-lel yeste-relay in two heiurs anel 22 minute.s, an hemr faster than the- bist previous commercial flying time. It made the return trip in three hours anel minutes. Condors cannot fly until are almost one year old. they at about four times and believed to have been hit_at least one time. Chief Lester saiel that in an automobile driven by the suspect were three overcoat's, three hats and the jacket he is believed to have been wearing at the time the armed robbery was commit- td in Ada. The chief of police went to Eu- faula luesday morning to help officials there search for the man who is believed to have held up stores in Durant and Hcnryetta in addition to the job pulled ROTARY CONFERENCE SET LAWRENCE. KAS.. Jan.. 15. rorrest C. Allen, geiver- nory of Rotary international dis- trict announced today the an- nual conference of the district would be held in Kansas City Kas-.. Anril 7 and 8. The Kansas City club, headeel by I-erris Kimbull, will be host te> the other clubs in the district which comprises the northeast corner of Kansas. Chonsticks are not supposed to enter the mouth, but are used to throw the food Critically III Pioneer Farmer-Stockman Suffers Stroke Saturday Tom G. Phillips, farmer-stock- man who has lived at Stonewall the past TiS years, was brought to Valley View hospital Saturday after suffering a stroke. He has been unconscious since the stroke and his condition was reported Tuesday afternoon to be A brother, Frank Phillips of Minneapolis, flew here Sunday to be with him. A son. Walter Phillips, died suddenly last year. fr Supreme Court Orders Hearing OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan., 15. (.T) Argument in a suit by the- Jackson Materials com- pany of Tulsa against the Grand River Dam authority was order- eel for January 2i) by the state supreme' cemrl teielay. The firm claimed it is elue the sum for work done as a sub-cont- ractor during construction of the dam. The suit was dismissed by the Craig county district court. Head tha Ada News Want Adi. I As Eeigar L. Warren, chief of the conciliation service, etc pick- As Edgar L. Warren, chief of the conciliation service, summon- i ed the disputants feir discussions em the issue, there were re- peiris from Washington that ernment officials reportedly had offered aelitiemal price relief as a basis settlement of the dis- pute. An aelded increase, the reports said, might provide- the basis for a wage increase of 5 to 6 cents an hour, which with the meat industry offer of 7's cents would boost the total to possibly 1.3'-j cents. The CIO United Pa'ckinR- house Workers union originally had asked 23 cents an hour but cut its demand to 17'3 cents with further negeitiatiems. Many Lead To Rig Settlement Warren said that an agreement reached by nine smaller packing houses, presiding for a wage in- crease of 15 cents an hour, might lead the way to a settlement be- tween the big packing plants and union. The nine companies employ 000 whereas a strike against (Continued on Page 2 Column 5) TH' PESSIMIST Mr llnh Jr. Don't call your doctor like yeiu woulel a tire- repairman- call the docteir before you're flat. honeymoon is over when th' husband goes Jcr a walk before brcakfcutt.   

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