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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 13, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 13, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             inj, News-Th. deportmen, onnounced ,oday it clnmlinr'x and warm- er Sunday, followed Iiy light rain or -snow in south portion. 42nd 229 THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1946 CENTS THE COPY CONFEREES DEADLOCKED ON PHONE STRIKE Must Retain Strong Forces Eisenhower Calls Atten- tion Back to Importance Of Occupation Tasks By IIOUAHI) COWAN TORONTO. Out. Jan. w.ive of "bring them r_nrrp' public opinion in the United State.-, is blinding Amer- ican occupation troups to the im- P nit.i rice th.- Allies in Gcrjnanv and Japan. Gi Dwight F.isenhowcr .1 conference today. Blaming this condition for r nf t: current unrest in tr.e Luropean and Pacific the- Telephone Strikes Begin their jobs at the Tele- Mipicme Allied m Km ope 'aid: i l.m.'ir In bi mi; the boys i; In the d< fiinti- influence on and morale. lie if eve] voile bimc us home we must not have nvjcii to do over here.' Hard to Convince "It's extremely difficult for a cnmrr.rir.d'ing the face this kind of convince tv.e rr.rn of the real importance '.r.-ir r-.t. "If the Demoei-atic Allies be- lhat a solid occupa- r.f h'l.-.tile t-iiitniv is ncccs- irv it's up to us ,mr at reasonable strength." Ki.M-nho-Acr reiterated he was evervthing to give 'r.f rr.cn v. !vi have "borne the r.-..r.t of battle a chance to co but 'aid he could not mir.'irler Rrrrultinc Not Yrt Knouch Responding to a question, the c i'f staff the U. S. army v.-.-.s in the eif a vigorous drive but that "dis- must pause before the recruitment are He sai'l it would be possible to rr.-iuce the American occupation rrrr.ios in Ciermanv to a small be dirpatched to ''trouble Cools' as the policy of recstab- responsibility with Gcr- rr.r.n authorities proceeded. RetrimM of German History Gc: manv's ability to wane war been smashed for the time but a look at the history German people demon- StraVs that "one savage defeat v r-r.'t chance the will to wage var." added. "We all have to get a con- that war i? the worst that can befall the hu- r T, ui mi.- nun ie- rare." Kiscnhower said' 8lme of President Elie Lcscot and the seizure of control bv a Beater I thrcc-ma" horror and destruction. ry.it limit rif atomic power at of the human r.-.ce wL" days one-hour sit-down (NKA Truman Intervenes, UNO Security INine Hours of Talk Gains Week's Delay Council Named! Fail to Bring Any Of Big Steel Strike Conference With Murray and Fairlcss Also Produces New Offers From U. S. Steel and ClO-Workers By HAROLD IV. WARD WASHINGTON, Jan. Personal intervention by Presi- dent Truman brought a onc- wcek postponement today of the lationwide steel strike scheduled r a.m. 'Monday. t It also produced new offers, of nature not announced, from with United States Steel Orpor- ition, Helhvether of the indus- ry, and the C'lO-United Steel, workers who had planned to .shut lown the mills in support of heir demand for higher pay Confident of Agreement Mr. Truman expressed confi- ence that an agreement will be cached, and the White House nnounced that the parties will be brought together there again next Wednesday at 2 p.m. Kast- ern Standard time. 1 Announcement of the delay came at the end of a four-hour .session in the i utive mansion, called by the president last night when wage i negotiations broke down in New i York. It also followed separate I meltings by the president in his offices witli Philip Murray, pres- ident of the steel workers, and Menjainin F. Fail I. president of b. S. Steel. The neral con- ference was held in the cabinet room across a corridor from the president's office. Collective bargaining will con- (Continued on Page Column 1) Mew Garbage Trucks Due Will Moke Possible Ef- ficient Service in Handling Growing Volume Here Haitian Celebration Is Out of Control Outbursts of Violence Accompany Wild Jubilation At Overthrow of Dictator Now Held Under Guard By PHILIP CLARKE PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti, Jan. dis- orders erupted today throughout troubled Haiti after a night of unrestrained celebration of the overthrow of the iron re- She'll Be Wekome Back fo Arkansas Schoolteachers There Kind To Children, Prospective Resident Assured i.n Si Tl.f; ROCK. e ti children. S! l.r (lav by Jan. !2 '.T. in Ai kansa-i of kind- Mr.--. Maino the Mate's at- (J'-ri'i.il f. .'.-.ri d< i-d of K. W a law to said chools in sc which "beat" he bad Little natina school .1 dj Hot Springs ar.'i Ma ill rr.y memories of ce ones. jrmal opinion prepares! bv ;.n of Williams' staff. J. F. the law did "not beating of child- lav.- does iiemiit icason- :.il purii.-'riir.ent such ii pa: en! the vav K' dly .viv Ill .ut iced, viHI an ad-  tl I ions Organization'i peace prcscr vation powers. The assembly also elected 17 members to the economic and soc- ial council of the United Nations Organisation. They are Chile. China, Norway, The United King- dom. Peru, the Soviet Union, the United States, Canada, Lebanon, Colombia, France, India, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, the Ukrainian Republic. Cuba and Greece. New Zealand and Yugoslavia were tied for the final place and voting to resolve the deadlock was deferred until Monday. Economic Council Important The economic and social coun- cil is a main body of the United Nations Organization and has authority to investigate economic and social conditions throughout the world and recommend action. It also is permitted to make re- commendations "for the purpose of promoting respect for and ob- servance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for nil It is expected to play a large part m the maintenance of peace and Nations Looking ahead to next week, tne delegates turned their at- tention to important resolutions, including one on control of atomic energy. A sub-committee will meet to decide at what stage these motions will be raised sociation of Communications cq uipment Workers today produc- ed no settlement of the wage dis- pute. Telephone communications through manually operated switchboards has been curtailed as a result of picket lines thrown around telephone exchanges by workers union, operators in many loc- tors might not resume their posts. Union Modifies Wage Demand When the recess in the Western Electric Equipment Workers negotiations was called, Ernest Weaver, union president, inform- ed newsmen that "very little" progress had been made during the day-long meeting. Meanwhile the possibility of d formal strike of the tele- phone operators vho are memb- ers of the National Federation nf Telephone Workers was mention- ed by one federation official. And he indicated that even if ing the outcome of meeting. Weaver indicated that the eq- uipment union had modified one of its wage demands, but that the company had not changed its (Continued on Page 2 Column 4) Government Seizure May Not Gel Operators Back on Jobs If Telephone Operators Strike, Spokesman Says; Radio Stations, News Printer Systems Would Be Hit Argentines Shut Down Commerce Industries Also Close Three Days Protesting Government Wogc Decree Millions Watch Victory Parade Estimate New Yorkers See Tribute To Yank Foot Soldier because of her long campaign for national independence, died to- day. Read the Ada .News Want Ads. i WASHINGTON. 12, Legislation awarding the congres- sional medal of honor posthu- mousyl to the late Gen. George S. Patton will be introduced in the house when it reconvenes Monday. Rep. Rankin (D-Miss.) an- nounced today that he will spon- sor the bill. NKW YORK, Jan. Millions of New Yorkers, packed for four- miles along Fifth ave- nue, roared tribute today to the nation's foot soldier as I.'I.OOII men paraded through a blinding Paper celebrating Amer- ica's World War H victory. slender. M-year-old Ma- h or Gpnpl'--'l James M. Gavin, nt rn.nc "''I fall division commander in but tlH-j the army, led the march in which warmer i his famed airborne division had the place of honor. i I By RAFAKI, ORDORICA I HUH.N'OS AIIIKS. Jan. 12-'.V-1 complete shutdown of all commerce and industry in Ar- gentina for three days beginning' .Sunday midnight was announced i bv the permanent committee of manufacturers, industrialists and businessmen today in protest against the government's bonus and wage increase decree The announcement cami- after a cabinet meeting presided over bv President Ge. Kdelmiro Far- lell postponed consideration of the employers' demand for a sub- stantial modification of the de- cree, issued Dec. 20. Under the decree Christina-, bonuses and pay increases, am- ounting generally to 25 per cent of pav rolls, were ordered grant- ed virtually nil the workers in the country. WASHINGTON. Jan. A spokesman for the telephone operators' union indicated today they might not man their switch- boards even though the govern- ment seized the telephone sys- tem. At present operators are re- specting picket lines set up by the striking equipment workers union but the operators union has said consideration will be given tonight or tomorrow to a formal strike of the nation's op- erators. A spokesman for the National Federation of Telephone Workers said if the government should seize the telephone industry as a result of the strike, "it should remember that a piece of paper will not operate the nation's tele- phone system." Asked whether that would mean that strikers would not re- turn to their jobs if the govern- ment took over, the spokesman replied: "That's the indication." The threatened strike of the 850.000 workers, the union spokesman said would result in "total collapse" of the nation's communication system. Itadio stations and news print- er systems would be affected, the spokesman said. The spokesman explained, however, that the national strike call, if issued, would involve post-war wage demands of the federation's 48 member unions. Previously, the union has said it would strike only as a sympathy measure to support the Western Electric walk-out. At the same time, he disclosed that 2.1.000 members of the fed- eration in Missouri. Oklahoma. Texas. Arkansas and Kansas have voted overwhelmingly" in, favor of the walkout and sym- pathy with the strike of 6.000 Western Electric equipment workers affiliated with the feder- ation. SOMK i.non OKKMANS HKI.D FOR MISTKKATING AIRMEN M1NDKN. Germany. Jan. (.1 i_At least Germans have been rounded up to await trial on charges of murdering or mis- treating captured American air- men, an officer of the U. S. war _. crimes section in the British oc- 1 shows cunation zone said today. He estimated that 700 cases involving the slaying or strike in merit of approximately Am- erican airmen who fell into the hands of German civilians, would be ready for military courts in the American zone within a few months. SOME OF GEN. MARSHALL'S WARDROBE STOLEN CHUNGKING. Sunday. Jan. large part of Gen- eral Marshall's wardrobe missing with a Chi- nese houscboy. Chinese police search for suspected boy was stimulated by fear of Generalissimo Chianjr Kai-shek's ire when he hears of the incident. Unless the clothes return- ed, officials protecting tho Am- erican envoy's home stand to tragedy in dignity-con- scious China. STEEL PLANTS WOULD TOTAL 1.298 PITTSBURG. Jan. The strike-list of the ClO-United Steelworkcrs shows 1.292 plants employing members workers in i 30 states would be made idle by I a general strike in the industry. I The majority of the workers would be affected bv the call for a strike Jan. H, but cribed as not authorized to strike before Jan. 23. terday At the hour wnen the 24-hour maximum is usually recorded Knid and Okla- homa City reported H4 degrees Ponca City and Tulsa 3C. Gate Clinton. Ardrnore and I.awton, and Waynoka ,'ifi. WASHINGTON, Jan r' Appointment nf U. Col. 'Brad- ford Ross of Cheyenne. Wyo as general counsel of the federal power commission was announc- ed today. Now serving with provost marshal general's office as deputy ejirector of the internal security elivision, Ross will go on inactive status immediately to take up his new duties, the announcement said. Victory Clothing Collection in Pontotoc county, met with com- mitteemen Friday afternoon and .IUIUK i better the drive. the they co'uld not J Hex Morrison, superintendent recall an ovation to reiual the of schools, will be on a radio one an estimated -t.imo.dllO per- program Wednesday night at 7--lr> sons gave the veterans. The par- ade was dedicated in Gavin's Old Clothing Drive Is to Be Pushed Harder in This County Martin Clark, chairman of the! mitteemen that any article of Americans insure against bad health, but smart Adans tako care of their auto- mobile's healtli at Sinnett-Mea- ders. 1-13-It Read the Ada News Want Ads. j Read the Ada News Wont Ads. words "to all the guys who walk- ed through the slog- ging GI." K On display in the greatest par- ade since when General Jfihn J. Pershing led the First division up the same avenue were the tanks', the artillery the vehicles and most of the combat equipment with which the axis nations were crushed. And in the air were fighter planes and transport towed gliders with which the allies spearheaded the invasion of Hitler's European fortress. Read the Ada News Want Ads. o'clock .equesting" that county I citizens write letters to be sent overseas, i Practically every village and every city where clothing will be distributed will have someone who can read or write English and those receiving the gift clothing may write to the person whose letter is enclosed in the garment he or she receives. Among those threadbare mil- lions, there are people of every age and from every walk of life babes, school boys and girls, aged farm couples, the village choir master, office clerks, doctors, teachers, young mothers and others. Clark explained to the com- k titlj t HL.H7 clothing sent overseas will be ap- preciated and used to its great cst advantage. Husr.el! Smith and Jim Webb of the Junior Chamber of Com- merce have agreed to contact all shoe shops, cleaners, laundries, hotels and apartment houses and request that old clothing that has been left be donated to the clo- thing drive. Kenneth Ambrose, chairman of the packing of the clothes, has requested that merchants con- tinue to save their discarded box- es and call Mr. Ambrose when boxes are available. Through the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Admin- istration, donated garments will be shipped quickly to the many countries where devastation of war has dislocated civilian sup- plies and civilian economy. Dis- tribution will be the Far East and the Philippines as well as to war-torn countries of Europe. TH' PESSIMIST If we don't git a lot uv these strikes settled pretty soon, we'd shore better have a big apple crop this fall. It's about time fer a spell of zero weather. The wim- mm 're already w e a r I straw hats.   

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