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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 10, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             A wheor grower who hos moved to town after getting his mail on a rural route for 25 years says he is enjoying his farm more now since he has rented it than he ever did Newt Incrrasinc cloudiness, warmer to- night; Friday cloudy and warmer. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 227 ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1946 Poultry Grit Ready To load Out' New Plant of Ten-Acre Rock Preparing to Ship Fine Quality Product ''We v, ill be loading, possibly in full f.ving. by next ticciared Jess Barbrc. head "of the r.ev.- Pure Granite Co.. manu- facturing grit for poultry and building M. iie fic.ir. tiie "Ten Acre P.ork." lung an abandoned Jan y -in n.ilc.-> south nf FIVE CENTS THE COPY Warming Up to Their Subjeci A w. A. D'-hn-.iy, Jr.. v.us introdu- c' is ri'.-.v president of the Chamber of Commerce. George MicRobfit. first v.ce president, t.-ulav's meeting of the body. Gi'idon Wither.'poon. r.c-.'.- sec niui vice-pi esident, v.as pre rnicl ti> the membership. Wendell Thomas was introduced ;.s the re-elect.-d treasurer. Klmer Kenison secietary-manager for Mai-Hobeit ijuotcd Dclaney as liavmg pri'.iously said. "No" or- ganisation can go anywhere or do anything without objectives." and program of the new officers for 194G would be announced "in the next few days." No Finer Grits Barbre revealed that there arc only two competing manufactur- ers of poultry grits in the U. S., one in Georgia, the cither in North Caiolina. But. "no one v.ill snake a finer chicken grit than ue will." Before the local raw material was determined to be the proper one. exhaustive lab- oratory tests were made. In dealing with poultrymcn, Barcre raid 'r.c is dealing with "cne of the best organized busin- esses here." and added they are fine business men. The product of the Pure Gran- I :te Co.. is called ''Kackel snd is manufactured in five sizes I for turkeys, hens, chirks and birds. Tile product will be s )id strictly to jobbers. Plenty of Granite The ''Ten-Acre Rock" is esti- mated to hold 20 million tons of granite. T.-.e present capacity of the plant is ten carloads daily. "Kackel Grits" is sacked in 10U- pour.d sizes, and loaded 800 sacks to the car. Switchboard 'Phone Truce Ends Operators Walk Out Civil War For Chinese At Washington, D.C Name Grievances at Leave Work on Strike, 'Phone Service in Capital City Immediately Curtailed WASHINGTON, Jan. operators of the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone company left their jobs today to attend a union protest meeting and leaders said they would stay away from work until their grievance is settled. Maybe there would be fewer strikes if all management-labor parleys were conducted like the one pictured above. On the warm sands of Miami Beach, Walter M. MaYks, left, representing York S Nat both of New City, of the milliners1 union, carry on negotiations on their new contract. Democratic Meetings Set Precinct Meetings An- nounced for Friday, Jan. 11, County Meeting Jan. 19 This Is election year and the democratic party is setting in motion its grassroots organization Two Held In Robbery Case Being Investigated in Con- nection With Bold Holdup of Tuesday be Surprise Hy-Product I this month. A .iv-pioduct was (iiscovcied The precinct meetings will V, nave value not anticipated, held Friday, January 11. Tr.r granite product of i Rural precincts will hold their grinding which they meetings at 4 p.m. and city pre- -rarcd would pie.-ent a disposal; cincts at 7 p.m. At these "meet-! problem, necn found to be ings the citizens are to elect! ;uir: as valuable fur finishing pre-1 chairman, vice chairman, srcre- I building stone as other .sands. tarv-treasurer and four members. I ir.e Puie Granite Co., has also( The county meeting will be! developed a buildim; stone, which held Saturday. Jan. 10, at 2 p.m. I :'.s claims has ten times the! at the county courthouse in Ada strength rf pure granite. made: for election of county chairman, o. pure cement and pure] vice chairman and secretary- granitf. After c.isting. the blocks i treasurer and to transact other ft re _ rmffcd to the original i county party affairs. p.r.K granite color and to polish. I Incidentally, the plant can con- vert from grinding operations to production within five minutes, then buffing out a gran- Two men have been arrested and placed in the city jail on investigation charges in connec- robbery of 2.11 West afternoon, store manager, not identify either of the men being held by city police. Both persons said that they could not be sure about the identity of the man who en- tered the store and took an un- disclosed amount of bills. Police still have some more checking to do before they re- lease the two men or file charges against them. A customer in the Army Alters Release Plan Eisenhowcr Direct! Release Of Men Nor Needed In Occupation Forces WASHINGTON. Jan. The war department undertook to recast its entire demobilization program today, as pressure mounted from disgruntled GI's demonstrating overseas. Pending this revision, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower author- ized theater commanders to waive all point score require- ments in getting home men not needed in the occupation forces. At the same time, Gen. Jacob L. Devers. chief of the army ground forces, told the country that public clamor for bringing the boys back immediately is "jeopardizing our security and wrecking the morale of men needed to maintain the peace." Change From Slow-Down The announcement that the army was redrafting its demobil- ization program came less than a week after the war department ordered its demobilization slow- :lown which touched off the ies of GI demonstrations in the Pacific and Europe. This slow-down order was the first drastic change in demobil- ization policy since the broad general program was announced after V-E day. There was no hint what lines the new demobilization program would follow, but the army promised that the revised plan would be forthcoming "shortly." Despite Eisenhower's order and the promise of a new demobili- zation program, increasing dis- satisfaction with the entire situ- ation was voiced on capitol hill by some lawmakers returning for the opening session of congress next week. Senator Says Program Snarled Senator George A. Wilson (R- lowa) was of the opinion that both army and navv release pro- grams are so snarled that only congressional action can get them untangled. Cor.'.ir.uerl Pago 2. No. 2 Dr. Ada Pioneer, Dies Funeral Today for Resi- dent Here Since 1904 Dr. R F. Kir.g. TG. died at his r.orr.c. 831 Kast Sixteenth early wedr.esdav afternoon. Funeral services were set for -4 Thur.-dav afternoon from Cri.f.veH's Chapel, burial in Rosc- caie c'mct'.'rv. Dr. Kinc was at Leiqhton. Ala., settled in Center in Indian icrntnry in moved later to Oklahoma C'ltv to practice, then to Ada in HHH rcniain- erl h're. His h'alth forced him t'j retire tv. o >earr. ago. He was a veteran of World War I _ Surviving rue the widi.w; a n.-ter two one of t.-.crn I. M. King of Ada. L TH' PESSIMIST 7 II.i. Jr. Bakery Victim 01 Night Burglary Thief Gets Into Knotts Bakery, Rifles Cash Register and Leaves Knotts Bakery was entered Wednesday night or Thursday morning, according to informa- tion given city police who invcs- I tigated the burglary Thursday j morning. The burglar apparently enter- i cd the building through a rear! entrance, went directly to the cash register in the front part of j the building and left without I bothering any other items in the office. j Three dollars were missing from the cash register. After taking the money, lie apparently left the building by raising a garage' door, which unlocked from the inside1, and left nothing be- hind disclosing bis identy. Police report that no one was working m the building lalo at i nigiit. Carl Easterling To Muskogee Federal Probation Officer Is Transferred er angles must be worked. The one thing that baffles po- lice most is the coolness with I which the robber operated. The' case has the markings of a pro- fessional job, they say. Bargain LAS VEGAS. Jan. y o u thought Nevada went in chiefly for divorce? County Clerk Lloyd Payne re- ports 11.108 marriages during in this city of com- pared to divorces. Maybe there's a reason. It takes six weeks to get a di- vorce, and costs an average of S180. But you can get married in six minutes and the license fee is only lease by April 1 of nil enlisted personnel except volunteers or draftees with less than a year's service. Disclosure that a detailed new armv demobilization program is in the works was made yester- day by acting Secretary of War Kenneth C. Royall. who released Eisenhower's cabled directive in- structing overseas commanders to expedite the return of surplus personnel regardless of point scores. This directive from the army chief of staff specified, however, that priority should be given men with the highest scores and the longest service. General Devers voiced his con- (Continued on Page 2, Column'2) About .1.001) operators, members I of the Independent Washington Telephone Traffic Union, met in closed session Irom until at Turner's Arena, after which their president, Mrs. Mary Gannon, told reporters: "All the operators will meet back here again at 7 p. in. we intend to stay out until our grie- vance is .settled. That's all I can say now." The operators contend that supervisors are overworked, and there is tno intense observation and too close supervision of op- orators by company officials. A I company spokesman said the walkout came because it insisted that supervisors do the duties for which they were hired and add- ed "no new duties have been add- ed." A conference between union and company officials, with assis- tant director Howard T. Colvin of the federal conciliation service sitting in, was arranged for this afternoon. The operators started their walkout at 10 a. in. Washington phone service was immediately curtailed. Dial Phones Unaccected Efforts to reach operators brought either no answer or a re- corded'announcement saying that "operators arc on Dial telephones were not af- fected but union leaders said they expected every member operator to attend the meeting, which would tie up long distant service and service on exchange operat- ed manually. The Independent Washington Telephone traffic union called the meeting for 11 a. m. New York Plans Set NEW YORK, Jan. A union spokesman said today long distance telephone op- erators would leave their posts here at 7 o'clock tomorrow morning and would be joined by more during the day. Such action would be the first step in a threatened nationwide shutdown of long distance tele- phone service ns a result of yes- terday's walkout by telephone in- stallation workers. John J. Mor- gan, president of the federation of long line telephone workers, announced the action. The walkout would be simul- taneous with the establishment of picket lines around the Amer- ican Telephone and Telegraph building at 32 avenue of the Am- ericas. The building, largest tel- ephone office in the city, houses all long distance, trans-oceanic and shin-to-shore telephone com- munications. Paradox _ BOISE, Idaho. Jan. 10. '.Pi Newsmen, seeking comment from G. H. Hill, chairman of striking telephone installation men here, tried to call him at his home. They found he had no tele- phone. Chiang Then Follows With Announcement Legalizing All Political Parties CHUNGKING. Jan. Generalissimo Criang Kai-Shek announced today, shortly after a truce had brought an immediate end to China's civil war. that the government had decided to legal- all political parties. He said the government would free all purely political prisoners, grant the people freedom of speech and promote local self government. Chiang, opening the political consultation conference almost simultaneously with the conclu- I sion of thi  Central Morris Plan bank. Perry introduced n contract dated Feb. 21. li'lP, in which he agreed to write the book on ma- terial furnished by Pruiett with both p.-irtus to share equally in tile profits. It is alleged by Berry be spent "two years of studious applica- tion and unremitting effort" in preparing the original manu- script and that he spent in ex- cess of in assembling ma- terial. The petition said profits from the book now total more than I Influenza Keeping Gov. Kerr at Home OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. kept CJiiv. Robert S. Kerr at the executive mansion Tf today and his office announced If steelmakers get n price in- :ill crease, then manufacturers of products using steel may want price increases for thrir goods. It might set the patt: rn for price increase demands everywhere. If prices generally went up. the government's whole program to hold prices would be smashed. We'd have inflation. Giving the steel Industry a price would en- able it to give wage undoubtedly would prevent u tragic strike. But eventually, then, what happens to the value of your dol- lar? appoint- ments. for the day. Italph Trask, the governor's secretary, said Kerr would re- main at home todav and probab- ly tomorrow in an ffort to re- cover in time to leave tomorrow night for Omaha. Neb., where he will deliver a Jackson day ad- dress Saturday, and then con- tinue on Washington. Among appointments cancelled by the governor was an address to the chamber of commerce, at Alva, scheduled for tonight. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. AttleeSaysllNOTo Make Life or Death Choice for Peoples Tells Opening Assembly of Organization That Coming Of Atomic Bomb Final Warning to Mankind, That Muit and Will UNOIs for All Common PeopU By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER LONDON, Jan. Minister Attlec open- ed the historic first meeting of the general assembly of the i United Nations today with a warning that the delegates must "make their choice between life or death" for the peoples of the world. "The coming of the atomic bomb was only the last of a I series of warnings to mankind that, unless the powers of de- j struct ion could be controlled, immense ruin and almost an- nihilation would be the lot of most of the highly civilized portions of the British leader told the representa- tives of 51 nations assembled at ancient Westminister palace. Attire said, "I welcome, therc- fore, tlie decision to reiril the whole problem of control nf ato- mic cn.crKy to n commission of the United Nations organization." This decision was made at the pro-Christinas conference of the Big Three foreign ministers in Moscow. It calls for setting up an 11-man commission. "Here is an invention fraught Heads UNO Assembly Belgion Elected President Of London Meeting; Seriousness Is Stressed By JOHN M. IIIGHTUU'KR LONDON, Jan. United Nations assembly, carry- ing forward the world's hopes for with immense possibilities on the one hand of danger and on the other of advantage to the human Attleo declared. Ultimate Alms Clear "It is for the peoples of the world, through their represen- tatives, to make their choice be- tween life or death. Let us prevcntion of an atomic age war, came into being in battle-scared London today and heard a bald warning that it holds in its hands tile choice of "life or death" for mankind. The warning came from Brit- ain's Prime Minister Cl< ment! Attlee after Dr. Kduurdn Zuleta In Phrases stnckingly rcminis- of Columbia had called the dele- I Abraham Lincoln's words gates of the 51 United Nations Gettysburg, the prime minister clearas to what is oar ultimate aim. "It is not just the negation cf war, but creation of a world of security and freedom, of a world JUSt'CC to order at p.m. a.m. Belgian Is President foreign minister of Belgium, who was supported by Britain, was elected president of the assembly for the London meeting. Tryve Norwegian foreign minister, was the only candidate nominat- ed from the floor. Lie's name was offered by Russia, who with the United States, supported him. On a secret ballot, the tally was Spjiak 28, Lie 23. Dr. Zulcla, temporary presi- dent of the assembly, told the delegates in the blue, cream and gold central hall of Westminster palace on parliament square that declared: "We who are gathered here to- day in this ancient home of liber ty and orer are able to to- gether because thousands of brave men and women have suf- fered and died that we may live It is for us today, bearing in mind the great sacrifices that have been made, to prove our- selves no less courageous in ap- proaching our great task, no patient, no less self sacrificing. "We must and will succeed." Have Learned From Mistakes Attlee reminded tho delegates, who seek to organize peace machinery designated to prevent an atom-powered World War 111. that all must give their unqualified and unhesitating support "to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war." Many In (jallrrira I The galleries overflowed and many persons stood in the cor- ridors, unable to get in. Curious citizens began gathering early in the streets outside, under the rainbow of the 51 flags of the na- tions assembled within. About 700 delegates held pla- ces on the assembly floor and the gallery offered seats for an- other reporters, phntogha- pbers, guests aiyl plain citizens. A question arose immediately as to whether this would upset informal agreements made earli- er among the big powers to sup- port Canada, Mexico, Brazil. Eg- ypt, the Netherlands and Poland for the six non-permanent pla- ces on the security council. Great Britain originally had favored Colombia rather than Mexico. WICHITA. Kas.. Jan., 10, With three fights ending in knockouts, Chilococ Indian In- stitute of Oklahoma defeated a Kansas City and Wichita boxing team 6-5 here last night. Read the Ada News Want Ads. at "we have learned from past istakes." "The old league of nations suf- fered from many disabilities, I most of all perhaps because two I great nations, the United of America and the Union of Soc- ialist Soviet Republics, were not present in its formative he said. But. he asserted, "to make organization a living reality we must enlist Ihe support, not only of governments, nut of the masses of people throughout the world. They must understand that we are building a defense for the common people." The British prime minister raised again the thought of the four freedoms set forth by the late President Roosevelt. the purposes of the United Nations organization we have (Continued on Page 7, Col. 2.) JWEATHERJ i i .4 cloudin- ess, warmer tonight; Friday cloudy and wanner, rain south and east portion; lowest tonight OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 15, 1946 Ado Evening News Cbriftaus Bariain Offer CLIP and MAIL TODA'T Ada Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find or money order) for which enter my subscription to the Ada Evening News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL By carrier in Ada, or by mail anywhere OUTSIDE Pontotoc and ad- joining counties. Name Street Number or R.F.D. State   

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