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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 9, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 9, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             b. cosy ,0 H... .nd when .h. foO-findin. .win, b. Mfc. rMdy hentejly over wllertier Iuch sueh is really a fact Mo-tly dourly tonight: Thursday cloudy uith rain simth. rain or Mill IV SIHltllC.ISt THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd 220 Lei Us Have Our Men, Is Gentry's Plea Crime Wave Here, Some C. O.'s Delay Letting Form- er Officers Out of Army TULSA. Ok la Jan. !i._'.l-_ S'.a'.o Safety Commissioner J. M. Gentry tndav averted delay in e nf for-icr lav.' enforce- ment officer.? from the armed forces '.va- for the "unpircedcr.ted crime wave now nation and the of traffic acci- (f Oklahoma, highway v.-m i nterrd military :n World War Two is a snail's pace." Gen- a .-pc-ch prepared for nclivcrv at annual conven- Oklahoma sheriffs tv are ot livers n-i doubt in our mind c mmandmg officers have making every to unne-es-arilv hold rv.rn in t'.e v n-erelv ti> pro- I T.C tr.r.r fancy military pay and partier." declar- ed Condition Is ry law enforcement agcn-   ta-k? befit'.ing their of the are rrrely irecied is just as as it was for the brass r.at; tn somi thing worth- v.r.i.e f or _ them to do while the Traffic Law rntorrrnirnt Nrrded "Crazy v drivers and have b. en quirk to a-i-.-aniaye of plight, r.-.-.e hospitals with dead and c-.-ir.g have plundered r.-..- (.-..-c-n- nt Gor.trv told ofiicers the be.t _-.vav V, ti.e spread of drivir-.g u as through cement traffic laws. t'.o manycnun- attorneys ar.d r'.'iniv to a-sert a attitude toward the driver.-." i'r.'.r a d: iv-r i; ronvicted ..-.e public tv cju.te t.. take away v-.r Piiv- nr-.r! cnntiniiis V' by car- W. P. INSTAI.I.ATION .MKN STRIKE IN IT.N.V, DKI.AUAKE Ahn-.i- V.-i.-.-'n Klec'ric .'tnliatiip. in peimsvl- anr! a: e at 10 a.m. .f'ia-.-. Prsirlr-nt Jo- P-: S. Van of 7L'. As- n nf E'l'.iipinent W'.ikers. Officers hero are looking for a man who lati Tuesday afternoon boldly robin d the Grocery Twelfth, and fled in an automobile. The man. unniaskrd. t p- forced his demand for cash at the point of a gun, refusing to a I low- cheeks to put mlr> the sack he handed the manager and also telling him not to put any silver money in. either. The robbery occurred about p.m. Some information is available. Part of the car tag number of the bandit's car was 117 and it was a Texas license; the car was a Mercury or N'asli sedan, dark in color and it is believed the man fl( d in company with a girl. Ma tie Demand Coolly According t'i Lester I.anier, inanager. the man had been in the store two or three times during the day. Wlun he came ir.' for the hold- 1 up he strolled into the- counter enclosure, pistol in hand, handed the cashier a sack and told her to tint the money jM the cash legi ,ter into tin ;.ack. She was Inghiened and didn't comply but I.anier. who had been standing with his back to the 1 bandit chatting with a customer, tinned around and found him- self hi ing directed to git the money. This he did. thi- bandit turning down and silver and tak- ing only bills. Exact amount of i the loot had nut been figured out early.today. in car and fleil He walked out so casually that others about the did not notice anything ami.-s and the janitor, sweeping pear the door, obligingly held it open for the MnipoM-d en- tomer. The bandit huiriid around the- cormr of the building, I.anier .shouted tn an employe near the back to try to get a car tag num- ber. I.anier called the police while the bandit was seen to gt t into a ear parked on Stockton and da-h away, turning ea-.t on Thirteenth pa. t the police sta- tion. Hi'cait-e the bandit woie no mask. I.anier and the cashier ix- to IK able to identify him if I''1 is picked up a suspect. Diapers On Their Way Ada Women Give Enough Material for Of Them for Destitute Peoples Kindly people here responded generously and quickly to an ap- peal the other for cotton materials to be used in making diaphcrs for the use of babies More Rain In State Likely Ado Gets .56 of Inch, Tem- perature Here Stays Above Freezing Level More The Anaoi'lnlril -_. me use or babies i More rain may fall in Okla- being born m lands left war-torn homa today and tomorrow and and destitute. the weatherman said some of it An announcement here brought i in the dry western third in diaper material, old sheets, Hour sacks and such like, enough for diapers. Mrs. N'. P. Brown, and two other women got busy and cut the materials into the of the state. Ada had .515 of an inch of rain, most of it falling early Tuesday chairman. I he temperature varied from degrees to 34. which was, to per Relief. Six church groups aided in the thar> inch fell at Mc- Alester and marly an inch at Ponca City overnight. Precipi- tation at the Oklahoma City air- port totaled more than an inch. Other rainfall reports included Ai dmore .311 of an inch, Enid Tulsa .24. Today's weekly crop and wea- ther report said livestock was growing thinner in the western part of the state because of a lack of feed. In the eastern sec- tion where drought-breaking rain has fallen, most cf the soil is donations here. i Mrs. Brown asks that others having such material turn it to the old clothes drive now in pro- gress to furnish clothing for des- titute peoples. 1 Vanished Vessel Was'0'Ship Lost Word Was She'd Been Torpedoed WASHINGTON, Jan. The navy today that the 11200 ton SS Carolyn which dis- apmared without a trace miles east of Norfolk in March, was on a shakedown cruise as a "Q'1 ship, j "Q" ships are camouflaged merchant vessels which appear to be easy prey to submarine attack but actually carry heavy arma- mi nt. In its announcement today the navy said the Carolyn had'hern converted to such war duty and renamed the USS Atik. Three days out of Norfolk, the Atik radioed on March 2fi, that she was afire, but not ously. Two minutes later a sec- ond ni( ssage paid, she had been torpedoed and required assist- ance. That was the last word reci ived from the ship. The navy said it is believed the ship was sunk by a U-boat, with all hands lost. The number of persons lost was not immediately available. Byrnes Reassures Vandcn- bcrg on Atomic Energy Policy at UNO Meeting Looms By JOHN M. I1IU11TOWER L, O N D O N. Jan.. 9, breach in the United States dele- gation over safeguards for atomic energy .secrets was sealed todav at a conference on the eve of the opening of Id United Nations or- ganization assembly. Secretary of State Byrnes con- ferred two hours with the Ameri- can delegates this morning and said later that, so far as he knew, his view of the safe guards was entirely acceptable to all. Senator Vandeiiberg .1 leader of the critics, said he had been completely reassured upon two points which he had consid- ered of paramount importance: That adequate security arrange- ments would precede "disclosures concerning atomic matters and that "any plan recommended by the atomic commission must re- ceive congressional approval in the United States." Four Agree on Plan The secretary said the United States. Britian, Russia and Cana- da were agreed on safeguards for atomic energy secrets under whatever control plan was devis- ed by the UNO. Byrnes issued a statement on the atomic energy controversy within the American delegation shortly after holding a two-hour session with the delegates and said that, so far as he knew, his view on the safeguards was en- tirely acceptable to all of them. Immediately afterward Senator Vandenberg a critic of Byrnes' atomic energy policy up to this point, issued a statement saying be now was "completely reassured." UNO Assembly Meets Thursday Thus harmony was restored 'to the American delegation on the eve of tomorrow's historic first session of the United Nations as- sembly at Central Hall. The controversy over 'Phone Installation Workers Begin Leaving Jobs Over U.S. May Develop Into Countrywide Telephone Shutdown By Friday as Second Group of W-E Goes on Strike NEW YOHK, Jan., 9. phone installation workers in widely scattered sections of the nation left their jobs this morn- ing in the opening moves of what may develop into a country wide telephone shut down by Friday. Hundreds of members of the association of communication workers (Ind.) who install West- ern Klectric company equipment for the fiell Telephone System their jobs in a dispute over wages. The union claims a mem- bership of n.OOO (Cq) in 42 states. It was the second strike against Western Klectric, 17.000 employes in its manufacturing branch hav- ing last Thursday in a wage controversy. PickctiiiR Starts Friday Picketing did not start at once, but union leaders said it would begin Friday and that once pick- ets were thrown around the ex- changes, they bad assurance that other telephone workers would not cross the lines. Such action would virtually shut down American Telephone system. The walkout was scheduled to start at a. m. but some workers jumped the gun and quit several hours earlier. The first workers to leave were in Ohio, Indiana and New Jer- sey. Scheduled to quit this after- noon. LD Service May Suffer For the present the strike will j not interfere with telephone ser-1 vice. However, if other workers i respect the installation employes') picket lines, most long dista'nee service and other operations handled manually will stop Fri-; dav. Dial telephone service will not be affected until breaks occur.! There will be no one to repair the; breaks and union spokesmen have' estimated that dial service n-i bog down in a week or 10 days I after the picket lines are form- ed. The strike became a certainty when an early morning confer-1 ence between U. S. conciliation the J. R. Mandlebaum and union and j I company. Snydcr and Collet for S4 Ton Raise, Bowles More Than S2.50 Delaney New Strike Moves C-C President Directors Elect MacRob- erts and Witherspoon As Vice Presidents Into Oklahoma No Disruption of 'Phone Service Likely Unless Picket Lines Formed W. A. (Gusl Delaney, Jr., OKLAHOMA CITY Jan Wednesday was elected president 200 Western Electric of the Chamber of Commerce, j Workers in Oklahoma went on wet enougli for seeding of oats grain, winter plowing, and other small Dream of Nylons, I Search for Rayons Nylons Not Arrived, Rayon Hose About Sold Out n ll a Hi'.] exchang. s Iir.g en tar.ee call.-, will be offic- neeji none !..ng l..-.'s of of Ivania pieke1 lines in I'liila- tiiat thi.-: would NEW YORK, Jan. _The jdicam of nylons has turned into I the search for retail I stores have almost no hosiery of j anv kind to sell. Nylons have not arrived, and ravons are practically gone. Many a woman who scorned the wartime hose a few month j ago because nvlons were in the offing, now is traipsing from store to store in hopes of getting I a pair of good old rayons, baggy knees and all, without success. Manufacturers say tile rayon sup- j plv will not improve. i Hosiery makers predict it will he at least six months before get- ting a pair of hose will be a sim- ple matter of walking into a .store and asking. But that next will be nvlnti Colonel Says He Broke Up Demonstration In Yokohama, Quoted as Saying If Men Wanted 'Lace Panties' He'd Get Them energy revolved around a pro- posal by the Big Three powers a_ml Canada, which also had f rench and Chinese support, that the United Nations should create a commission to work out atomic energy controls. Vandenberg had assailed what he privately called the vague Ian- gauge of the proposal as endang- ering American atom secrets Byrnes had contended all along that the United States would j never have to give out any in- formation it did not want to No Hie Thrrr iMKiimlrrstaiiilinc Byrnes began his statement to- day with a reference to reports! in the London morning new.spap-' ers that he conferred with foreign Minister Krnest Bevin on atomic energy last night Byrnes said that in the minutes or more he spent with Bevin last night the subject of atomic energy did not c-oine up He also reported that he had not discussed it with Foreign Com- missar V. M. Molotov since the Big Three foreign ministers meet- ing in Moscow. He said that his assurance that there was no misunderstanding a- rnong the powers on this point was based on the views express- ed during the Moscow conference. G-E and CIO-EW Resuming Talks replacing Charles, Thompson. He was elected at a meeting called for members of the board of di- rectors of the organization. George Mac-Roberts was elect- ed second vice president. Wen- dell Thomas was re-elected trea- surer. Returning to the office as sec- atomic retary or manager of the Cham- ber of Commerce was Elmer Kenison. Each of the officers was elect- ed bv acclamation. Witherspoon and MacRoherts were recently elected to the board of directors and taking on more n sponsihility as officers of the organization. Flood Wafers Rage In Parts of South Account for 21 Deaths, Leave Thousands Homeless strike today as a wage dispuli, which began in the east, spread over the nation. Officials of the Independent Association of Communication'; Equipment Workers said the men did not report for work at Okla- homa City. Tulsa, Cleveland, Stroud, Cromwell, Holdenville. Norman and Lawton. But no picket lines were im- mediately established a r o u n d telephone buildings and no dis- ruption of telephone service was likely until such lines wei e formed. D. McCowan. president of the Southwestern Te 1 e p h o n e........, Workers union in Oklahoma, feienci TH' PESSIMIST YOKOHAMA. Jan. American occupation forcfs were warned today "subversive forces will take their cue for sabotage plans from our future actions" after a provost marshal reported he had broken up a "hothead demonstration" nf soldiers pro- t'sting a demobilization slow- down. I.t. Gen. Charles p. Hall, aet- ing commander of the Kighth army, s nt this message to j troops through the army news- 1 paper Stars and Stripes. "Tile Japanese people watch witn interest the fir.-t indication headquarters of Tower Echelons I A mimeographed paper "nis- aceomphsh nothing because all charge." circulated among soldi- on demobilization of a general breakdown of mor- ale and di -ipline beginning to! Shipping -liii-.v tip in occupation tror.ps. He added that "Subversive fun-is n.aitfis come direct from the war depart ment." It came as soldiers in this area called for a mass demonstration tomorrow before Eighth a.my h( adciuarters. Genual Hall said the redeploy- ment of men frorr. Japan as of Dec. ,'il far overshadowed the replacements received m the same period "and if this] them over u n e q u a 1 percentage continues, prison our forces in the occupied coun- tries- will be left in a precarious ers ouoted Mahoney additionally: "If you want to go home I'll take you home. I'll see that you get to my Yokohama prison. You're insulting a man who's a better GI than any of you. "If you want lace panties I'll get them for you. Just let me bear you sing 'I want to go home' again nnd I'll pick out two or three singers and personally take to my Yokohama IiixV.H uv a lia- i.'.' v. h' n up in a car Other Harp plans t tent on n .1 cnrr.'-r uv th' cam- n cnrii'-s t' col- Vi s quick In n-.e in the ranks, '.'.ill lake their cue lor sabotage plans from our future action.--." C 1. Charles A. Mahoney. pro- vost marshal of the U. s! army I s< i vice command who said he- had seatteied molesting soldiers on tin- arrival of Secretary of War Patteis.'in. uas by a mini'-ngrapbed paper as saying: "If you want lace panties, I'll i g'-t them for you." Accomplish Nothing i General Hall's message added: I "Protest mass meetings at the Not Rrduccd there had been icdiiction in the amount of -hipping allcx-ated for the trans- portation of troops during Jan- uary and that eligible men would be ndeploycd according plan. Mahoney disclosed he told the demonstrators who met Secre- tary Patterson with cries of "We want to go home'' that "You are insulting a man who was a sol- dier before you were born." "I told them to stop or I would take steps to break it up imme- Mahoney said. "I ask- ed them if they were soldiers Or Boy Scouts.'' Mr.honcy denied telling the men. "You are acting like a lot of as stated in the pancr. The colonel that sol- diers who gathered in front of the adjutant general's building were stirred up by "a lot of com- munists and hotheads." Disacrec On Patterson Visit The paper said the sicretary did not leave General MacAr- thui's srdan. Mahoney. however, said Pat- ttrson left the car and went into the building where soldiers made him an "honorary GI." The colonel described the dem- onstration as a "near mutiny." (Continued on Page 2, Column 2) I NKW YOHK, Jan. II i flcials of the General Electric j company and the CIO United: hlcctncal Workers Union were j to resume negotiations here today I in rfferts to forestall a possible nationwide strike of elec- trical workers. The union has called a strike for January 15 against General Electric, the Westinghouse Elec- tric Corporation and electrical plants of the General Motors Cor- poration in an effort to obtain a S2 daily wage boost. General Electric lias offered a 10 cent increase for those earn- I mg less than a SI an hour and a I 10 per cent hike for those earn- mg more. ifhens SfrikerT Win Raise in Pay ATHENS. Jan, !i, i.l" -Strik- ing street car, Hailway and Power Plant employes in Athens and its port. Piraeus, returned to work today after reaching a compro- j mise with the government in their demands fur increased wages. A communique issued by the federation of electrical workers, said the strike would be suspend-1 ed until the return of Vice Pre- mier Emmanuel Tsouderos from financial talks in London and a final government decision on the pay question. j ll.v Thr A Flood waters raging at the highest levels ever recorded in some sections of the south have brought death to at least 21 per- sons, caused multi-million dollar property damage, and left thous- ands homeless. The death toll stood at eight in i Tennessee, six in Kentucky, six I in Arkansas and one in Georgia. Torrential rains which have pounded the area for two days continued early today, but the weather bureau in Atlanta said the worst was over. _ The number of homeless in Kentucky alone was estimated at as conditions began improv- ing in the stricken Hig Sandy and Cumberland river valleys. Vets Planning Own Building Group Oklahoma Cityons Will Build Low Price Homes j OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan., 9,   group of returned service men from all branches plan to; incorporate as veterans associa-1 I led to build low price homes for I men who served in World War 2. 1 Harold Brand, a builder, heads tin- group. Men who constructed installations in the European and i Pacific theaters will do the work j ,-uid will be paid prevailing wages. I The smallest house planned will have two bedrooms a.id will sell for approximately Two tracts of'land have been offered the group by fathers of two veterans. Hut moie land is needed. Said Hrand: "We are going to try to take care of ourselves. If we can get the materials and a place to put them, we have the skills, the man- power and the determination to get this work going immediate- ly." !l. The navy's oriental language school at Oklahoma A. M. col- lege will close July 1. _..... Read the Ada News Want Ads. i Kansas, Texas. Missouri and Ar- kansas, has notified the South- western Hell telephone manager in Oklahoma union members will not cross picket lines "if estab- lished at telephone buildings." O. K. Muselmann of Tulsa. Oklahoma chairman of the union, alsn an independent, said work- ers would honor picket lines. Western Electric men install I equipment. A species of honey making wasp is found m Mexico anil the .southern part of Texas. F. A. Pierce of Humboldt coun- ty. Calif., raised a mohair goat with hair five feet long. By MARVIN L. ARROW-SMITH WASHINGTON. Jan. A steel price increase of about S4 a more than the limit previously set bv re- ported under consideration by the government todav. Officials in a position to know but who could not he identified by name sail! they understood re- conversion Oireclor John W Snvdcr anil Stabilization Admin- istrator John C. Collet had de- cided (he higher price should be allowed, despite sharp Protest bv Price Administrator Chester Bowles. steel industry, f.icine .1 next Monday, has hol-.lini! out for an increase of a ton as a condition to resuming uollcctive bargaining on the de- mand of the CIO steel workers' union for a S2 a dav wage boost. Meanwhile, telephone eauio- inent workers started a strike acainst the Western Electric com- pany, threatening a complete tie- un of the nation's communica- tions No FlckfU Just Now At first, however, the associa- tion of communications rquin- nient workers (independent) did not establish pickets. Other telephone unions h.-iv- saul they would not cross picket lines. Officials said that while no firm decision had been rcachM on the amount of a steel price increase, they expected one "at almost any time now." Bowles is reported to have taken the stand in steel conver- sations with President Truman that a ton is the maximum increase that could be allowed within the framework of the ad- ministration's wane-price policy. OPA Kor S2.SO Maximum OPA was reported tn make any announcement involv- ing than S2.50 orice boost. Kor this reason, it was said, the announcement may be made bv Collet or Snydcr. or perhaps by the White House. The White House declined com- ment today on reports of the con- templated SI increase. Press Secretary Charles Huss said In- doubted whether there would he an announcement today. In response to news con- questions, Hoss said hf WEATHER i L ______ cloudy to- night; Thursday cloiidy with rain south, rain or snow southeast by afternoon or night: not much change in temperatures: low to- night near 20 pan handle, elsewhere. had no idea anv announce- ment conci-rnim: the steel situa- tion would hi- made. 'Hie new telephone workers strike started before the sched- uled hour of II n in. The union is a sister one to the striking Western Klcclric Kinploves Asso- cn'ion. ;m independent. Top CIO lenders summoned hen- hy CIO President Philip Murray, including R. J. Thomas, nresident of thr CIO Automobile Workers. Albeit aid. president nf tin- CIO United Elec- trical Worki resumed strategy conferences- this morning. "HIlT Thrrr" Krrp Touch Murray. Thomas and ald comprise the "Big Three" in tile CIO's drive for 30 per crnt wage Increases in the st< el. auto- mobile, electrical and mrr.tp.ick- imr industries. They have been in constant personal nr telephonic t o u r h with each other for weeks as tl-.p strike siluation progressed, anil the union made it clear that no major lattlennnls will be ef- fected in current CIO disputes (Continued on page 2, col. 5) OFFEIl KXIMKKS JANUARY IJ. 19-115 Ada Evening News Christmas Bargain Offer CLIP and MAI L Ada Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find or money order) for which enter my subscription to the Ada Evening News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL By carrier in Ada, or by mail nnywhcre OUTSIDE Pontotoc and ad- joining counties. 95 year Name Street Number or R.F.D. Town ________________ State   

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