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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 8, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 8, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Th. Hmfarf H..v.n ..I.. h.v. in c.mm.n with doesn't di. owny Mme5 and mony a 'hot-stove' talk about the last sales and future ones. Mostly cloudy. light rain or driz- zle south central and extreme east this afternoon THE ADA EVENING NEWS 42nd 225 BUY MORE WAR BONDS Turner's Top College Is Needing Sale Animal Rooms for Veterans Goes lo Texas ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, JANUARY, H. 1916 An acute housing is developing at East Central State College. With its dormitories practically filled now ninety veterans have applications on file for rooms beginning with the second .semester, January 21, and more applications are coming in daily. Many of these veterans are married and some of them have children. They cannot come here if they cannot find housing accommodations in Ada. tlcavcn saies circuit am lo citizens who have rooms or apartments ended another, successful year injwhlch can bc made available for these veterans to phone LftB- L' Parker at th' Allege, Alamo Farms of San An- tonio Invests SI In One of Famous Turner Line the -.ale li.e Turner Monday afternoon, the id Heaven Her States. Sixteen hulls sold Mon- a-, traced and 24 hcif- crr averaged SI.TIB. Alamo Hereford Farms of San Ar.to.nio. Tex., purchased T. Roy- al Rupert 158th. a son of Haz- d Rupert 81st. for to top tr.e null sales. Carpenter Buys One One of finest hulls offered :n the sale will stay in Hereford Heaven as L. P. Carpenter laid dr.wn SI 0.000 for Beau Zento T. S3rd. Carpenter liked the breeding in tiie blood of ti.e hulls and is ;me- that he will lit m with his present dinu program. Pushing the bidding rnnsistant- iv. Dan Thornton of Gunnison, Cold. Tona T. 1st for 54.450 or the highest price paid .or any female. The animal will f-'mn at hnrne at tin- Thornton Hcri-r.ird Gunnison. find iioiimy Sales llarn Last ear. vi'.itor.s found It to! a .ml) lo yet into the oarn at the Turner Ranch, hut tr.e Mtuation was changed for the Ifliti sale hccau.-e Hoy Turner had built a -cw S27.tiOO'pavilIion. Despite the fact that the new building has a seating capacity of there was no standing room .fit :n the sales arena. The did sell as was ranch officials had expected for the average- was a- rioui jl.OiiO below the average of For instance, the Turner had Ijcen offered SS.noo for year ago which was Phone 3040. By making rooms available for students, especially for veterans, you will bc rendering a valuable service to the" Col- lege. Respectfully yours, A. LINSCHEID, President. Byrnes Sure Atomic Issue to Be Settled 1345. Jewish Conference For Unrestricted Moves to Palestine American Group Also Wants Country Made Into Democratic Jewish Nation Lands in London for UNO Meeting, Says U. S. Safe- guarded in Arrangements (Continued on Pago 2. Column 3) Cabinet Leaves It To Shidehara If It Is lo Resign Bv Kt'SSKl.I, IlKINFS TOKYO Jan. Jap- nr.ese cnbm. t checked tr> ailing, Premier Shidehara today the question of whether it would re- under allied pressuie to rid j t.-.e coverr.mcnt of war-makers. announced. _ pneumonia., t.-.e ear-old premier v.-as un- no.e :o attend the day's cabinet rations but received a rep'rt on its me. ting. ?aid Kura- rr.ntsu tiie cabinet's pri- secretary. that the M'lf v. ould make the ns to whether the ould reMgn rr remain I after its forthcoming WASHINGTON-. Jan.. The American Jewish conference today asked for unrestricted Jew- ish immigration to Palestine, and re constitution of that country as "a free and democratic Jewish commonwealth." Henry Monsky. of Oinab, Neb., testified before the Anglo-Ameri- can committee that his organiza- tion voiced the views of the "over whelming majority" of L. S. Jews. The committee is inquiring into thc feasibility of further immigra- tion of Europe's refugee Jews in- to Palestine. Monsky declared in a prepared statement that establishment of! a national home for Jewish peo- ple in Palestine was "stated LONDON, Jan. tary of State Byrnes said tonight there was "no doubt" that the atomic safeguard Issue which has come up within the American delegation to the United Nations assembly would bc worked out satisfactorily. Byrnes said he expected to have an early talk with Senator Vandenberg a mem- ber of the delegation whom he ns his friend. He also sent word to Foreign Minister hrnest Bevin of Britain through a foreign office official that he hoped to see him tomorrow. Receiving newsmen in his ho- tel about half an hour after he arrived here by plane, Byrnes was asked whether he thought the atomic question, which has become a major issue insofar as secrecy safeguards Where Jap Prison Brutes Face Trial FIVE CENTS THE COPS The story of brutalities suffered by American prisoners in no- torious Jap Mitsushima Stockade near Tokyo is being systemati- cally unfolded in thc Yokohama courthouse, above. In thisbuTdmg an American Military Commission is proceeding with the trials on atrocity charges of the lirst of more than 300 accused former officials and guards In thc infamous camp. Congressmen Talk Action in Gl Protest Gl's Rushing Pleas To Congress For Quick Homecoming ed. would be worked out satis- factorily. Have Same Objective "I am sure it will he re- plied. There can be no doubt of that. Whenever people have the same objective they never have MANILA, Jan. thousands of G.I.'s flooded coin- merical communications offices today, relaying to congress their pleas for a homecoming while they awaited the arrival of Secretary of War PatUr.son and congressional comniitteemen to whom they hope to protest in person. ._ It was not known how many of are concern- i ".'c Protestants were eligible for Dcmonitrotions in Europe, Thc Pacific, Washington Get Solans' Attention discharge. H a r b o r authorities said only are eligible to sail this month but that 10 trans- ports with a capacity of to are due. Ciimmltt.'e Saturday A U. S. senate .sub-committee investigating post-war bases and is expected here Sal- American policy, rooted in Ameri- finding language to reach surpluses is expected can principle and idea." objective." "Tiie Jews of America are not! sa'd 'lp had issued his merely interested in Palestine as the American ve- -i haven or n sanctuary for in- itos ln tnr United Nations security dividual Jews or Jewish re-, coulcl be used to protect fugecs." he said. "They are also American atom bomb informa- concerned for the preservation of' tlon ln order to help out rcport- the Jewish people as a cultural crL ln tho United States. r. i r fir'r.l rice in office Kar.izaimr M-c: -t-t a del hc-lrej Sr.ic. t v said tiie ciccision because even Shi- litical '-ppom-nts lace n future under Gen- thur'.-, directive to i e- office all those take Japan to war. o Mr.-o.--hi. assistant chief F'cietary. ted the made a .-tart tov.Mid hew- th" by approv- ordinance bann- i.ii-ii ties. :-u '-el tak- n a M-rnnd and inure that 1.-ga- ii of ulirana- lie- office. Ml- and national entity, and they are insistent that the people, ail but destroyed by the Nazis in the last World War. shall now be I conditions which will enable, them to be masters of their own destiny." Palestine, the Anglo-American committee was told, can readily accomodate in the next decade ail the Jews in western Europe who wish to migrate there. Robert Nathan, former director of the office of mobilization and reconversion, estimated yesterday i -l that half of the Jews j left in Lurope or Russia want to press headquarters in Tokyo said that Secretary Patterson plans to visit Manila "the middle- of next week." Lt Gen. W. D. Stylcr, com- i manding army forces in the Western Pacific, had told rt pre- sentatives of protesting G.I.'s that Patterson had decided to by- pass Manila on his world tour. But a spokesman at MacAr- thur's headquarters explained make the Holy land their home It can absorb BJ5.000 and l.j.OOO Jewish emigrants in tin- coming ten years, hi- declared. London in President Truman's giant plane, "The Sacred Cow." Ueforc leaving Washington last night, the secretary told report- ers he would call a meeting of the U. S. delegation to the Uni- ted Nations assembly "as as 1 there." Gives Assurances Byrnes devoted all of yester- day to ei leans trying to convince Am- at home and abroad ar.! t.-.e fxclir.i pu added. The t-rs w..l he of were studving rdmanccs which ary for the full en- the diiectives. IKI.D. Mojan.. n. nation is anxiously watr.'iing Mi-smn i. wh. -h it ,.x- pecls to be a mam battli-ground in this year's elections. Senator I- rank P. Briggs told over democrats at the Jackson day banquet here night, Greater returns ILT amount in- Ne.vs Classified Ads OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 13, 19JC Ada Evening News Cbristous Bargain Offer CLIP and MAIL TODAtT Ada Evening News, Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find 5------------. (check or money order) for which enter my subscription to thc Ada Evening News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL F] By carrier in Ada, or by mail anywhere OUTSIDE Pontotoc and ad- joining counties. 95 year .Vame Street Number or R.F.D. To-.vn _______________ State Two or three reporters had submitted Questions about the atomic bomb resolution which the big powers will sponsor at the United Nations meeting Byrnes said. i thal nf taking Manila off tsyrnes and his party flew to his schedule. Secretary Patterson put it on, after he arrived in To- kyo. He did not plan to go to Manila, at the time he left the United States." The secretary is scheduled to go to Korea Saturday or Sunday, soon then proceed to Shanghai before flying to Manila. Mass Meeting Orderly Monday night's mass meeting hereof 12.000 enlisted over the objections of General orderly, and mil- itary police said the remainder of the night was The meeting approved a resolution demanding a eongies.-aonal inves- tigation of the slowdown. General Styer's writ- ten explanation that the new program would spread over six months the number of men pre- viously scheduled to go home in three was roundly booed. From Guam, the navy news reported 18.000 men attended two outspoken -protest sessions tr, tv. -a there, and the Stars and Stripes, 1 ,nrb V ,C'Ub !lt newspaper, said enli'ted luncheon at noon ov'prl confused and dishcarte-netl. (Continued on Page 2. Column 3! Gen. BartoFWill Rotary Speaker "Firir There Barton" Com- piled Brilliant Record In- cluding Bulge Battle Mai. Gen. Raymond O. will speak its regular Wednesday at the Aldridge ifotei! I jNon-Rotarians are invited to hear i him by making luncheon reserv- I ations with either Rotary Presi- dent Rernard Howard or Secre- tary Guy Thrash. Reservations must bc made by 10 a.m. Wed- nesday. General Barton is an honorary member of the Ada Rotary club C.en. Barton became known as I 'First There Barton" because of his being first general ashore in Normandy, first into Cherbourg first to break through in the July attack at St. Lo and Pcrriers, I fust into Paris, first into Ger- many and through the Seigfried line. The outstanding success of Gen. Barton and his Fourth Infantry division is fated the stand cast of the city of Luxembourg, official- ly so stated in a letter of com- mendation to Gen. Barton from Gen. George Patton. Gen. Barton was in the battle lines for almost six months of continuous fighting, including the creat stand during the Battle of the Bulge that repelled thc at- tack of two and one-half German divisions, held its line intact and then, with reinforcements, drove the Germans out of its sector across the Saner river. After that, the stomach ail- ment which Gen. Barton had had through the years became acute and he was ordered to the U. S. for rest and recuperation. Marine Corps Has More WASHINGTON, Jan., The marine corps made more of its men eligible today for release from service after Febru- ary 1. The corps cut its discharge score from 50 to 45, making the new quota eligible-. The reduction docs not affect women marines. The critical point score for the women's aux- iliary was dropped to 18 on New Year's Day. The marine corps estimates that since V-J day it has released personnel, or approxi- mately 52 per cent of the total reduction necessary to cut its maximum wartime strength down to the planned neacelimc level. Marfa Han Record Snow MARKA, Tex.. Jan. B. i.T> The Alpine-Maria district of the Big Bend country shoveled itself out of the biggest snow storm on record today. The weather station at Marfa army air field said that the snowfall there was approximate- ly 10 inches. Alpine reported inches. By WIM.IAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON. Jan. Global GI cries of "Snafu" over demobilisation got Capitol Hill worked up today. As doughfoots demonstrated in the Pacific. Europe and right out- side the capital at Andrews field. tin- slowdown in the army's de- mobilization program brought these congressional repercus- sions: 1. Demands for a congressional investigation of the entire pro- gram as requested by American soldiers in a resolution adopted yesterday at Manila. 2. The possibility of a rush of signatures, when congress recon- venes next week, to a house peti- tion that would force immediate action on demobilization legisla- tion. There was a strong probability that the house military commit- tee would order an investigating, or at least an informal inquiry, although Chairman May (D.-Ky.) was said by colleagues to feel that the army is doing the best it can. May is in Florida. Rep. Short For Action telegrams and petitions demanding action have started piling up in the committee's quarters. Hep. Short a mem- ber, insisti.-d that "we should do something about it." Citing figures on occupation needs, enlistments, inductions and army strength. Short told re- porters he could not understand "why the army has to delay de- mobilizing high point men." A house iiuiuirv was requested bv Hen. Mike Mansfield (D.- Mont.) in a letter to May. and Hep. Clarence Hrown (It.-Ohio) declared to newsmen "we are en- titled to know what is going on. What Does Army Want? "If world conditions haven't changed and then- is no emer- gency, can it be that the war de- partment is simply pressuring congress to enact compulsory military training or to extend the draff.'" Mrnwii asked. Hi- noted that the army is sup- porting compulsory military training and-extension of the draft law which expires May 15. In announcing the demobiliza- tion slowdown last week, the army said selective service and voluntary enlistments together were failing to provide enough replacements. House Democratic Whip Spark- man of Alabama said he believes tiie iiiilitary committee, of which he is a member, should question armv leaders "so all tin- facts can be laid before the public." Hill Dust' Gathering dust in a house mil- itarv committee file is a bill in- troduced last September by Rep. Rankin (D.-Miss.) directing thc release upon request of anv in- dividual who: (A) Has had 18 months of active service since Sent. 16. Ifl-HI, (B) Has a wife, child or dependent parent, or (C) Wishes to resume education in- terfered with by militarv service. Rankin has a so-called dis- charge petition on file in tile house. If members sign it, his bill will come up for a vote. At last count, there were about 150 signatures, the Mississippian said, adding that was before the army announced its discharge slow- down. CIO-UAW Has Contract With Kaiser-Frazer Bonus Wage Contract Worked Out, Penalty For Worker in Wildcat Strike DETROIT, Jan. 8. The CIO United Automobile Workers today held a unique and unpre- cedented bonus wage contract with Kaiser-Frazer Corp., new- comers to the auto industry, which they will offer as a model for settling disputes with the in- dustry's long-established firms. Union leaders hailed the con- tract, announced by both sides late last nicht. as "unquestion- ably the best ever reached with an automotive company." Session Secret .In a whirlwind finish to a highly-secret, seven-hour nego tiating session. Henry J. Kaise chairman, and Joseph Frazc president, announced at a pros conference that the new fin would: 1. Hase wage scales on prevai IIIR rates at the Ford Motor Cc Houge plant, said to be the high cst in the industry. 2. Meet any increases crante nv General Motors as a result o the current GM strike :i. Set up a pool laviiiR asid 5.) for each Kaiser, the company' low-priced ear, and Frazer it medium-priced car. prod uee< jltiruiR the year at llu- IIIR low Run homher plant, leasei from the government for aul production. The pool would bc divided among Kaiser-Fraze production workers at the end o each year. Penalty on Wildcat Strikes The company has estimated it production rate will reach 300 000 cars annually, so the will be about To prevent wildcat strikes was stipulated that any worker participating in a work stoppace not authorized by the UAW-CIO International Executive Boan. would lose bonus benefits for the period of participation. The contract also provides foi a union shop, checkoff of dues and. in thc opinion of both com- pany and union, the "most fav- orable" veterans' clause ever drawn up." Thotnas Praises Deal R. J. Thomas. UAW-CIO presi- dent who postponed fliRht to Washington lo take part in the proceedings, described the ncgo tiations as "one of the briRht lights in lalior-nianaRcmcnt re-la tion.t." After the press conference, at which he sat on a sofa between Frazer and Kaiser. Thomas left by plane for the capital to report to CIO President Philip Murray and heads of other CIO unions. W-E Strike Clamps Hold on New York's Telegraph Services No 'Wires' To Gotham Out of Ada Strike There; Local Phone Operators, W-E Silent on Plans poo Weather in Change To Cooler, Welter Forecast Change Is for Little in Temperature Vet Auxiliary Fleets OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. Mrs. J. II. Wirtx. Oklahoma City, has been elected president of the auxiliary of the Oklahoma veterinary medical association. Other officers include Mrs. E. T. Hiley. Lawton. second vice- liresitlent; Mrs. R H. Knotts, Still water, parliamentarian. More cheese Wisconsin than state. A week of pleasant weather except for last Friday's big rain ran into a sharp change ovrr Monday night with colder, damp- er weather taking over. Monday was blowy with a high of 50. then the low slid to 35 and during the late hours of the night showers peppered the city with .10 of an inch of moisture. Heavy mi-t and lowering clouds were Ada's portion Tues- day but the Associated Press news of the forecast had a favor- able slant change in tem- perature. This might head off slippery streets and walks that would result if the thermometer dropped a few degrees. The AP rctiort is to the effect that clouds, light rain and little- change in temperature is fore- cast today for Oklahoma City east, with cloudy to partly cloudy toward the west. Rainfall reported during the night included .10 of an inch at McAlester. Ardmore .07. and Tulsa and Oklahoma City, a trace. Highest s t a t e temperature Monday was degrees at Ard- moro while Guymon, with 19, had the overnight low. The only other state city to report sub-freezing temperature was Waynoka, with 24. There is no information re- leased locally pertaining to a strike of telephone and telegraph employees, but Western Union h. s received information that no traffic to New York or Newark, N. J. Western Union has received a telegram stopping all traffic to the two mentioned points be- cause of a strike in those two cities. Tele-grams sent to the two cities may bc delayed' as long as 24 hours for the delay is indef- inite, according to the informa- tion received locally. There was no information either pro or con available from the Southwest Hell Telephone op- erators in Aila Tuesday. Vote In Oklahoma City OKLAHOMA tele-phone union spokes- man said today telephone work- ers in Oklahoma City have voted not to cross picket lines if and when established by Western Electric workers here. A Western Electric strike is in progress in the east and may be extended into Oklahoma by Wednesday. Thc spokesman, who would not Tie-Up Hit. Transactions Of World CIO-ACA Calls Strike, Says Complete in City With Workers Out (Continued on PaRe 2. Column 2) Finding of Body Of Kidnapped Girl Spurs Intense Hunt is produced by by any other tornad Friday It has diseases i other disease been found that mental are as prevalent as all combined. Big Bend Country Under Deep Snow MARFA. TEX., Jan., n, Thc Big Bend country of south- west Texas shoveled itself out of its biggest snow on record to- day as the deatli toll mounted lo 30 in tornadoes which swept through five east Texas counties, causing property c'amage of 600.000. Snow, which began Sunday, was 10 to 12 inches deep here- arid at nearby Alpine. Twenty- eight persons, one a baby, were stranded in motor cars and buses for several hours near here be- fore rescurers could them. Red Cross Workers at Nacog- doches reported latest figures a which broke there last as 30 death injured and 11511 families homeless. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. CHICAGO. Jan. ma- liac kidnap-slayer, who stole six year old Suzanne Degnan from icr bed in the early morning lours Monday for ran- and then hacked her tiny body to pieces and dumped them nto sewers, was hunted today by in infuriated force of police offi- 'ers. The grusome discoveries last light of the child's head, chopped from her tinv bodv. and lismembered parts of the blond. )lue-eyed girl, came after one of hi- biggest man hunts in the ity's police history got under- vn v. The head, torso and legs were ound in four different catch 'asins in the vicinity of the Dcg- an home- at Kenmore Ave- ue. in the Edge-water Beach dis- rict on the north side. Only the two arms of the little ictim were missing i.; nearly Oil policemen and crews from le city sewer department con- nued their all-night search. Meanwhile, scores of the de- artment's top ranking detectives an down every possible clew efforts to apprehend the kid- ap-killer. Several men were taken into ustody for questioning. There no disclosure immediately by olice if any were regarded as ism-els of the brutal murder. The only possible clews, po- lice said, were two bags, in one of which parts of the bodv had been placed before being thrown into the sewers, fingerprints found on the window sill of Suzanne's bedroom and a make- shift seven foot ladder used by the kidnaper to enter the girl's room. The parents, since the discov- ery of Suzanne's kidnaping at a.m.. Monday, had maintain- ed hope throiinhoul vestenHy that they would get their child back bv paying S20.000, as de- manded in a note left in her room. WEATHER Oklahoma Mostly cloudy, light rain or drizzle south central and extreme cast this afternoon and southeast and extreme east tonight: slightly warmer north- west this afternoon and pan handle tonight; low temperature tonight 25 panhandle to 35-40 southeast: partly cloudy and warmer Wednesday. Forecast for Jan. R-ll Missouri. Kansas, p k I a homa and temper- atures in northwestern Nebraska on Wednesday, a d vane ing to southeast Oklahoma and south- east Missouri on Thursday fol- lowed by steady temperatures until slightly warmer Saturday and Sunday; temperatures will average above normal in Nebras- ka, near normal in Kansas and northern Missouri and somewhat below normal in Oklahoma and southern Missouri; little preci- pitation except light rain in east- ern Oklahoma and light to mod- erate rain in southern Missouri tonight nnd Wednesday. By ALLAN USHER NEW YORK. Jan. Telegraphic isolation from the rest of the nation and partial cable isolation from the world hit the international business capital today when Western Union employes struck at a.m. four hours earlier than sched- uled. Almost immediately the heart of the great network came lo a near-standstill. Union members in eight international and radio message firms refused to accept traffic emanating from Western Union by whom a union-estimated 40 per cent of international c o m m u n i cations normally handled. Business transactions all over the world were impeded and snarled by the tieup. A union spokesman, describing the strike as "100 per cent effective." said l.fiOO points in New York and New Jersey were affected. A spokesman for the CIO American communications asso- ciation, which called thc strike, told reporters at the company's Hudson street headquarters hub of the- Western Union net- the strike time was advanced because the company was "shipping in four carloads of strike breakers." A company spokesman denied that Western Union was brinRtnR in strike breakers, saying "there was nothing to" such reports. Louis Siebcnberg. vice chair- man of Local 40, one of eight lo- cals of the CIO American Com- municaJions Association which are involved in a wage dispute with the company, said at 9'30 a.m.. that the strike was "100 per- cent effective with em- ployes out." Another union spokesman said that points in Greater York, including all of Long Island ns well as Newark. Hobo- ken, Union City. Jersey City and Bayonne in New Jersey, were struck. Still a third spokesman for the union said "a state of strike" had existed among employes since last night nnd that "very little work" was done bv union mem- bers bec.-iuso they were "highly indignant" at the company's re- jection of a proposal bv Mavor William O'Dwycr for settling the dispute. Tries lo Chisel In On Kidnap Money Now He's Trying To Clear Self of Crime ST. LOUIS. Jan. ald H. Morris, agent in charge of the Federal Bureau of Investiga- tion, said a man arrested in the Union Bus Station here early to- day hail demanded in three telephone calls tit James Degnan. lather of. slain Suzannr Uegnan in Chicago. "So said Ncirris. "it looki like nothing more than an at- tempt to chisel m on the folks up there, but we are inveitig-jting every possible angle." The youth, booked as Grover Casey. 23. of Troy. Ala., was ar- rested at the Western Union of- fice in the Union Station when he called for the money. He told authorities he had been in St. Louis only a few days. Norris said Casey told of read- ing about the kidnapping and deciding "this is an easy way to pick up some money." On the third call, at a.m. (central standard time) today. Norris re- lated, thc youth told the Degnan family "the kid is all right." and was told at that time that the money was on the way. TH' PESSIMIST We've never been able to figger out whut makes a fel- ler tie one uv them coon tails on his car. We'd retire if we ever Rot t' be worth as much as one of them Hereford bulls.   

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