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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 7, 1946 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 7, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             Condition, bock normal Hm.. now wh.n a lov. Partly cloudy, cooler this after- noon, generally fajr tonlsht and Tucsdav. m Chicago can ogain barge back among the leading news of the day. FHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA. MONDAY, JANUARY 7, FIVE CENTS THE COPX Cattlemen Turn To Turner Sale Today Remembering That Roy Turner's Sale in 1945 Wai First in National Hereford Sales Averages, at 'The Ki-ippii.R enthusiasm connected with the sale of a Sol.000 Saturday had not died down bv Mondav Sunday H was oven stronger than it had been Sat- urday a.tiTnnnn followinR thp sale because 'most everyone was lookup forward to the Uor.se Shoe Ranch sale of Sat- urday unc.spei-iedlv, ar.ci -t.-i-cus uric flabbergast fS rr purchase- price fur Del Zrnto St. Cattlemen from many states beforehand that Hereford Heaven sales make history, but r.- expect such h dra- chapter to be written. Turner Sale Today Caltierr.cn left Ada Monday the idea that more written at the rr.er Ranch sale Monday aftcr- Old Clothes Drive For Other Nations Gets Under Way Style leaders constantly seek to get people to become c'lothcs- VIT Program Has 75 Vels In Work Here several days. _ Turner Set 1945 Pace quality of (lie cities and towns'the (drive began today, to extend through Jan. 31. Tlie goal is usable UAUIJltJ bred and raised at Turners is shoes and bedding for destitute peoples cf many More Applications for In- training Places Are In, More Places Lined Up Approximately 75 ex-service nen me now at work in on-the- ob training places, according to Jun Walters of the local commit- ee which is handling the local end H the Vcterans-in-training pro- nien arc Icarning trades r skills and are receiving gov- rnment assistance pay which nakcs it possible for them to ork in training with employers aymg beginner scales. If Checks Are Late Some checks from the gov- ernment arc reported to be late. The committee here is sending out post cards ad- dressed to Ada high school. 11 employes whose checks arc late are asked to fill out tin- questionnaires and mail the cards in so that the com- mittee can start checking UD on why the delays. There are about 20 more ap- plications of veterans being pro- ('pecpH Vinra H-i __ 90-Lb. Texas Girl Kidnaps A 200-Lb. Taxi Driver cessed here through this part of ino :_ I f It was the Turner sale the veterans administration pro- In Ada the schools are the cen- gram. Oil Companies Prefer to Deal Directly With Union on Wages Gl's Asking Investigation Thousands in Moss Meet- ing in Manila Ask Probe Of Deloy in Home-Bound Trips UNO Sets Out On Its Career Atom Bomb Issue First In Minds of Delegates As- semble for First Meeting By JOHN A. PARK'S LONDON, Jan., 7, By JOHN GROVER I issue of "'9 atomic bomb up- MANILA. Jan. 7. At thcir minds, delegates WASHINGTON'. Jan (F-_ least American soldiers 51 of the United Na- I fourteen oil companies served t im _ i 4 .j 1 I OTIC Will cnt m ,t 41. I_ ___ _ I _ i nnf _____. _ Notify Governmenf Fact-Finders Of Their Preference Don't Core for More Hear- ings; Union President Soys Wage Dispute Real mobilization slowdown and thiin-I Condon, the general as- demands to continuation of fact- finding hearings. .-old 5D for i M tatal income of 5175400 in rank' tlon methods. in Hereford sale aver- ages, wi-h for his animals. Head of A. II. A. Hoy Turner, owner of the fam- ous Burner Ranch, is president of tr.e American Hereford Associa- tion :n addition to being a mem- ber of tr.e Hereford Heaven As- sociation, which has gone a long way toward setting standards for breeders in the world. tr.e capital of Hereford -.Cuvin, has been turned over to Truman Nof On Manila Protest7 WASHINGTON. ..i i4VK.ni i3 in IMP J A j hcart-touchinir need and to the r j ,lndlcalpd the follow- lt> ing list of places now occupied bv veterans in training. Printer-pressman, frozen foods rose grower, cook, hotel manager null superintendent, feed nutri- flour miller, feed mill foreman, tire shop, flour salesman advertising, wholesale oil distribution. Baker, auto mechanics, parts men, radio, welder, shoe sales- man, cleaning plant, book sales- men, refrigeration, dri-ice, en- gineer, ranching, law clerk. Sheriff and Deputy Arresl Their Sons Both Younger Men Robbery Charges Okla.. Jan. 7.- Three Killed When Storm Strikes Area Plantation Section South of Lake Village, Arkansas, Suffers; Red Cross Aiding Tornado-Stricken East Texas LAKE VILLAGE, Ark.. Jan. persons e fa were failed, several others injured and of here last night. or moref ame fir t south uu v> u tlflU IIIUM- ii f t--.- dered approval of a resolution I somb'y the united nations will calling for a congressional invcs- tnr tigation. Boos rang through thp hall as an enlisted man, acting as chair- for its first Imirsday amid hopes it will suc- ceed where the old league of nations failed. til.Ill- T I f t.ian, rcjd a statement from U Vs; America. Britian Citn. W. D. Styler. commanding i Canada an; willing to go in army forces in the Western Pac- I information about the ific. explaining thc delay in home I ls to bc discussed thorough- bound trips. j jy by ihc general assembly some Earlier, thou ilisted men lu Stylcrs headquarters and sent in ........sands of milling I aftcl' Prime Minister Attlce enlisted men had marched to the opening sessions. a committee of five, which was told by the general that the c h a n g ing international situa- tion" prevented sending all eli- gible men home at once. Long before 6 p.m., service- men began gathering and climb- ng the twisted masonry fronting he great flight of ruined steps o the caoitol entrance, where a iinko-shift stage had been set up vith a wheezing loudspeaker. f-n, ine issue of safeguarding American atom secrets may force a big power review of the atomic energy plan agreed upon recently at the Moscow Foreign Minist- ers conference. This review probably will b- held as soon as Secretary of Stat Byrnes arrives and before th United Nations begin working ou international controls for atomi energy in line with the forma resolution submitted by Britia Only two companies, appeared as participants when the fact- finding panel reconvened after a IG-dav recess, and one So- cony Vacuum Oil company of u-Tl declared it uould continue only on its own Fourteen other companies tele- graphed the panel that they continuing mgotiations with the union and. in general, saw no need for coming to Washington. Union Head Repllt, A- Bright, union ptcsidcnt. declared in a state- _ By the time Harold Schiff- I behalf of the United States H. Tulsans in Narrow Escape When Car Turns Over Twice Ading Cass. A. body and fender ThopThardware' Also duo for arraignment Jn 'MUrance' Barger. em- dc-monst.-atirms bv army Both .wcrc arrested Saturday rr.cn.in the Philippines! informations filed by Un- f Two Crewmen Die secretary Charles :ng G. i at ---'-----gambling Q I came and Barger of four burg- ".N'one has Leon taken and; I'o-e. :S considera-i AIDS ATTEND A NCF The nursery in the, K Meth- England, provides ar.d free so that1 rr.ct.-.ers rr.ay attend the I arrc.-t and charge. orderrd his son's the filing of the In Prolejl March In Plane Crash Six Others Injured In Murky Weather Landing dfed' o'f "jcu ui noWPVpr_ >mth ,_______ Sunday af- I4 miles southwest of Ada when their automobile skid- ded from the highway and turn- ed over twice before coming to a stop. Mr. Cleve and his wife were enroute from Tulsa to Ft. Worth. I'cx-' when the accident occurred at p.m. Sunday, It was raining hard and the blacktop highway was slick, vvnen Cleve approached a curve his car started skidding and he lost control. Members of the highway patrol stationed in Ada said Monday morning that Cleve was appar- ently traveling at a reasonable rate of speed when the accident occurred. A 1942 Nnsh driven by Cleve was practically demolished. Neither of the twi Tile tornado occurred durine a heavy rain. It killed a man iden- tified only as Taylor and a nej> couple, Ed Royal and his wife tennants on a plantntion near Jennie, four miles south of here Uucot county sheriff John Biggs reported. bb The twister blew a small club- nouse and three waterfront cot- tages into Lake Chicot, near here, Biggs said. TEXAS Cross and local relief agencies were caring for 500 homeless families and more than injured persons today as the death toll mounted to 29 in tor- nadoes which swept across five east Texas counties. Robert Edson. Red Cross direc- tor of the midwest district, who irrivcd yesterday from St. Louis estim.-it.-H property damage at s four additional emers e of h-rv u injuries and six other both rccplved tmergen were injured whe Cy treatnicnt "3 loc--" hospital. injured when a Pennsy at- the U. overshot a runway and i .irniy s redeployment Camp Bos- I crilshed into a creek. i'WEATHERi L.C- Havre marched to were co-pilot Dclmar' c a m p headquarters yesterday j n- .Duskin. Jr.. Oklahoma City protesting dclnvs in their ship- and Captain Samuel Carson of home. Stars and Stripes! Poscvillc, Mich., an extra pilot j s.iid today. who was on a check trip Duskin and Carson died in a Birmingham hospital. The pilot Raymond Paulis of Rochester N. 1., was seriously hurt. The army newspaper said the had read- they would OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 15, 1946 Ada Evening News Christinas Barfim Offer CLIP and MAIL Ada Evening Xcws, Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find 3 (cneck or money ord subscriPtion to 'he Ada Evening be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL U By carrier in Ada, or Q by mail ar.ywr.ere OUTSIDE Pontot5c and ad- counties. year Whilsalooi Hirohilo lo U. 5. First Frost to Be Shown At yet Hospitals and Civic Events By DUANE HENNESSY YOKOHAMA, Jan., 7 First Frost, the white stallion from Emperor Hirohito imperial stables, was hoisted aboard a liberty ship today as an Ameri- can army lieutenant's souvenir, 't will be San Francisco that lured prancing on dock. The horse Two Die in Auto Souih of Ardmore Fire Destroys Cor In Which They Were Woiting ARDMORE, Okla.. Jan. 7-'.11 highway patrol said Oscar TI and Mark Idell. 29, Burneyville. died today in a fire which destroyed an automobile in which they were waiting for companions to return with a repaired tire. Troopers Then Cobb and Roy Clinton said four companions found the car in flames when they returned. A flat tire had Malted it five miles south of Ard- more. troopers said there was no indication how Ihc fire started. Read the Ada News Want Ads. stimated omnnuilil I deaths were reported from the storm which struck Friday night t-dson said the estimate did not include damage to pine forests of the counties. Issue Clothing, Food Two Red Cross emergency dis- pensing stations have been set up here and another at Palestine to issue clothing, food and bedd- ing to destitute families. Nine emergency shelters have been set up by local chapters in the five counties National headquarters of the Red Cross fo'r in, Rochester. N. Y.. the chair- man, called the meeting to orde the triangular lot in front of thc legislative hall was packed with thousands of soldiers. GI's Speak Their Mind Tliey cheered as one by one cn- nien took the stage their mind. The speakers exhorted their listeners to write their congress- men, and declared the war de- partment was changing the rules on redeployment. Meanwhile, a charge was hurl- ed that a uniformed man, repre- senting himself as an officer, ex- amined hundreds of soldier tele- grams to congress which already had been turned in to a cable of- fice here. The charge was made by Earl Baumgardncr, manager of thc Manila branch of the Radio Cor- poration of America, shortly af- ter the soldiers demonstrated outside the office of thcir com- manding general and called a- nother mass meeting for tonight. Baumgardner said a Filipino night supervisor was on duty ear- ly today when a man wearing an U. S. army officer's uniform en- tered the office., demanded to see the files, and read them. Violated Codex The manager declared that whoever the man was, he had no authority to examine the files, violated the civil and criminal codes, and he had called thc mat- to the attention of Lt. Gen. W. D. Styer. commanding army forces in the western Pacific. "You can be certain that the Canada, Russia, and herself. France, Chin (In Washington, a state depart men spokesman said last nigl (Continued on Page 2 Column 3 Another Big Lisl Of Jap War Crime Suspects Due Soon TOYKO. Jan.. 7, ---------.UK1CI11C headquarters will issue at least one more major list of Japanese war criminal suspects to enculf ugh government officials who night escape the latest sweepinc lirective for a political purge Brig. Gen. Elliot R. Thorpe de- clared today. The chief of counter intelli- gence said he had talked the mat- er over recently with General who had left open he question of future arrests. Ihorpe likewise served notice hat Japanese officials who re- sign under MacArthur's order last week to remove from office all those who helped lead Japan to war might still be prosecuted by nt ,thc negotiations over the 30 per cent wage in- crease demand were being ham- pcred by company introduction of "extraneous issues" In a telegram to Dr. Frank P. Mr chairman of thc oil pan- el. President M. Brcwster Jenn- ings of Socony-Vacuum objected to government consideration of ability to pay m studving wage questions, declaring this Indi- cated a trend toward "rigid gov- ernment control of Injection of the ability to pay issue recently resulted 'in with- drawal of the General Motors corporation from government fact-finding proceedings in the encral Motors strike case Referring to the same issue iS counsel for So- lold his firm yould continue in the oil fact- indmg hearings but would nre- cnt only such evidence as toils Company Assails Trend Jennings' telegram said So- ony was "unwilling x x x to ncourage a trend in the direc- a economy." Any tie between wages and armngs." Jennings asserted would lead inevitably and rap-' dly to a rigid government con- rol of industry. "Such control ty be almost i -called fascist allied courts. The Japanese Press published stories saying that the order had created Japan's "greatest politi- cal challenged the future of Premier Shidehara's much critizcd cabinet. The newspaper Mainichi said the cabinet was unable today to of with the Jcs which r. t in Germany and Italy during the ln30's." The other company represent- ed at the hearings was the At- lantic Refining company. Knight's statement pointed out that the oil fact-finders had re- cessed before the Christmas hol- idays hoping that oil refining companies would negotiate set- tlement of the wage dispute Hages Issue. Says Knight However, he reported, only was without the knowledge ur approval of General said Lt. Col. A. R. Hurd, relations officer. milk uii: j "-1 uimuit: luuav IO tWO rcfil cable office do about Mac- different companies Had" reached Arthurs blunt orde. and that much depended upon n meeting of Foreign Minister Shigcru Yos- mda and MacArthur, possibly to- board feet of umber v- aSa possibly to- which it estimated -is stiffie ml No statement can be made un- Headquarters said no meet- for immediate emergency con invcstlKation is completed been arranged, how- struction requirements whether any inves- tigator of this command is guil- A government source estimated Chinese Troops Are Now in Mukden CHUNGKING. Jan. 7. The first national government roops entered Mukden Saturday Corning after a march along the ailroad leading to the city a emi-official dispatch reported icrp today. The announcement said the oldiers were greeted by large. nthusiastic crowds. The same day 10 more plane f ....'it- oads of Chinese troops landed at hangchun. capital of Manchuria rom Pciping. the dispatch said! Earlier a committee of five soldiers personally placed the men's complaint in the hands of Styer after a parade of about 000 soldiers to headquarters dur- ing the morning. Patterson By-Passed City G. I. committeemen also sought to voice their complaints to secre- tary of War Patterson on his ex- pected arrival but learned he has decided to by-pass Manila on his current world tour. I Styer told the committeemen1 tnat the "changing international situation forbade sending all eligible men home immediately Military police said all the do (Continued on page 2, col. 4) Luck and Presence of Mind Bring Local Truck Driver Out of Tight Spot Recently Street Number or R.F.D. A highway accident with sev- eral freakish angles and with the curious service men to Meiji sta- Presence of mind of a driv drum for his only occupation ap- back from war cam peaiance goes to the United f'nall.v with a minimum at Hit Something Solid But the wheels struck Town c-. united States as the trophy of Lt. Dick Ryan, former Hollywood stunt man who staged rodeos for the army m the Pacific. 'I turned down all motion pic- ture offers for First Frost and nVt i A h-'m at vcterans' hos- said CU'IC cvents-" Ryan ''eport disclosed today that the Japan racing association early in the occupation offered thur h tT MacAr- thur, but he declined. OKLA., Jan., 7   services were held Sunday for Lt. Norman Imel who died in a Japanese prison camp. Mrs. LPS- of damage. And, says Johnnv Rogers, dri- ver for the Luper Transfer com- pany. It wasn't as bad as fight- some- jlnvinK some cxtra Garments with came out! sharply" J n-v .reaped with one amounti the embankment al-C.h a nn lar- swirled t ik III il.l linvcr re- thing solid, the truck ing the This in spite of his being caught in the cab of a truck that was under water and having to get out to safety, which he ac- complished briskly. The truck left Seminole early Saturday morning with rain Jailing. Heavy rains of the night had sent Salt Creek rolling high. Waters had backed up across the flat bottoms along the creek and were about 18 inches over the pavement. ,nJP.hnny. had already slowed to .iO-jJ5 miles an hour miles back and eased into the water expect- ing to push safely through 
                            

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