Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 6, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             m m Cloudy Sunday and Monday. with licht rain portion Sunday niffht nr on Monday. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd 323 ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, JANUARY G, IMG DELANEY BULL SELLS FOR RECORD FIVE CENTS THE Delaney Sale Is Spirited Del Zento 1st Hits Top Price, Then Other Fine Lazy D Animals Bring High Average W. A. fGus) Delaney. Jr., promi.-.ent Oklahoma oil man and nationally known producer of registered Here fords. Saturday moved further into the limelicht with his cattle when he sold Del Zcr.to lit f.ir 551.000. setting a new worlds record for a price paid for an animal of Hereford breeding. Just a year ago, Delaney was so ill that his life was despaired of. Saturday Delaney, tanned and fit, watched bidding soar to a new world record on a bull ir.at was hrcd and raised on his Lazy D Ranch near Ada with top breeders of the nation bid- dine ragi-rlv before all bidding stopped at the record price. Thrre To Three Countries Of interest to both cattlemen and spectators at the sale was the fact that the first three ani- mals sold at the Delaney went to three different countries. It :s not unusual for a number of states to be represented in sales, but three bulls to three coun- tries has its significance. The countries are Canada, South Af- rica and the- United States. C. C. Buxton of the Horse Shoe Ranch start-d the bidding on the world champion animal at Everett Incle. owner of the In- Klewood Hereford Ranch at J.tena. Ark., had the bid at 000 but whin the record price was ivetually bid it was George Rodenz of Toronto. Ontario, who was willing to pay for a herd bull. Bidding Went Fast With only tv 5 minutes gone, Del Zento had n bid of snd seven minutes later the all- time high bid was made. Mr. P.odcrz jumncd the bid from to It was not the wish of Ranch Manager Jack Smith that the animal be sold because he had planned to keep the bull on the ranch as a herd sire. He had raised the afc.it of Beau Zento 54th Tlnce the time the animal was born and was proud to have the animal at the Lazy D Ranch. To prove that "pure bred cat- tlr will he higher before they are cheaper." the bulls in the De- lanev sale averaged and 45 Hereford.-; for an aver- age of S2.1P5 to outdistance the average of 1045. Top Ilrifrr Prices Mr. Scott nf Pitt.-.field. III.. Was a Prince, Now Is King Tornadoes Hit Texas Many Known Dead In Palestine Area, Fear Othcri Buried in Dcbrit PALFSTINF a ,n r Saturda-v morning the extent of royalty in Herc- ford "oavcn was not known' the glad word has been Del Zento 1st Goes On Bid of George Rodenz, Canada, Successful Bidder; Hereford Heaven Sales to End Monday With Turner Ranch Auction n. verged" on cast Texas to aid spread to all sections of the United States that a Hereford br Association Sale Success prince of his jiuvjjii; u i u u >l h t a 'r rri" Th'u ?ricc' paid by GcorSe ot Toronto! Cord Of SS0.100 (nr n hull enl.J K., Year 1945 Rainiest On Record for Ada Runs Year's Total to 57.29 Inches Despite Beginning And Ending With Drough Months; Total Over Average The past year was a twelve-month of war and and, for Pontotoc county, WEATHER, the rainiest year in recorded history here and this with three drought months included. Collection of Old Clothing for Other Countries Begins The annual old clothing drive for the destitute countries in Eu- rope will begin Monday. January 7. and continue through the month of Januray. P-TA organizations nnd the American Federation of Church Women will operate collection renters in the various schools of Aela. K. K. Tn-adwoll will take paid highest price for a'ht-if- V'lilrce "f "rouaht to the t-- rr ar.cl r.e the high price Mann school nnd Stewart nt.t animal but for will take any brought u -el of twins. Each animal roH office in th- for library building at Kast Central. Loyd Noble of Archnore pur- Citizens of Ada nnd Pontotw in the rale, a bull for nml tnki- it to J4.500. Black could not attend the sales, wanted a Hereford Heaven bred bull nnd asked Mr. King to buy tr.o animal for him Rodrnz Buys Others Mr. P.orienr: purchased several arirr-.-ns at the- Delanry sale in addition to the bull. He bou-ht one' of (he heife-ri paving and Inter when he' paid f-.r a heifer, it was the s! roriel highest price paid for a !-eif.-r. The lancv ?ale was heard bv thn'.-K.-irids of people. por. e.f il was broadcast through tr.c ef American -sroadrniting Company from to o'clock Saturday -T.o.-ning. From to pm another brcadcast originated Irom the sale ring through Sta- tion V, KY in Oklahoma City. Frank BrownTOil Manr Is Dead any of the collection centers. Martin Clark, chairman, re- quests that all contributions be- as clean as possible and in gooel rcp.nr. Snaps and buttons are- not available in the countries where the clothing will be worn, so it will be greatly appreciated if they are supplied first. Shoes should be polished for pre-sorvation and new shot strings added. They should be tied se- curely heel to toe to conserve k With normal rainfall for a year being about 35 or inches, the county recorded 57.29 inches eluring Records have been kept here beginning in 1911 and that sets a new high mark. Three Months Helped Little The record was reached almost without any assistance frpm Jaw- uary, November and December. January started the year with n scant 1.03 inches. November in- treiduced n drought that sprinkl- ed .59 of an inch through the month December fell still farther behind with .53. Thus the yrar ended ns it be- gan, on n elry note-, with the three months tctnling 2.15 inches of rain, nnel with people begin- ning to develop a craving for more moisture. But the nine rainy meinths sentative for oil well drilling and production ton] manufacturers who was well known to the Ok- Jar.oma oil fraternity, died at his J-.orr.e here yesterday after a snort illness. Brown, formerly a tool com- pany representative in O k 1 a- r.ome. had headquart-rs at Sem- and Ada in lfl3S and 19.16. His wife, who survives, is the former Novella Henderson of Trcumfeh. Brc-.vn was considered a lead- ing authority in oil well work A native of Waxahachie. Tex., ho began his cnrctr as a roustabout in California field? at the age of 34. He later was Shell Oil Co superinte-ndrnt in its Borneo fields nnd technical adviser to the- Soviet government in Cau- casasus and He en- tered the business for export llf in 93G- Services be here Monday. .ipace and prevent miss-matching' Aela merchants an- to save all cardboard cartons packing and bring (hem to the centers or contact Kenneth Am- brose, who will nick them up. National Western Opening at Denver DENVER. Jnn. boys in blue jeans will mingle with society matrons in furs and farm boys will watch hopefully as iudges look over their pamp- ered steers nt the National West- ern Stock show next week. Entry lists arc the largest over and during the Jnn. Jan. five dollars is expected to lands in livestock trans- The threc-dav convention of the American National Livestock Association starts Thursday with Secretary of Agriculture Clinton H. Anderson as principal speaker. "ar Stolen From Ada Man Found Virgil Aldridge. contractor, re- ports that his automobile was stolen Friday night from in front of his residence at 230 East Thirteenth. Saturday afternoon city police reported that tho car had been found in Oklahoma City Aldridge says that the car was stolen some, time after 9 o'clock Friday night. Read the Ada News Want Ads. with their 55.14 inches of rain- fall weren't forgotten. Pastures, Hayfirlels I.u.sh A change- in nuricultural em- phasis resulted during the year for the standard row crops were hard hit while hay thrived nnd pastures were lush for livestock. Monthly rninfall-for 1945 was: January, 1.03 February. 6.11 March. fi.B2 April, 5.58 May, 3.32 June, 11.13 July, 5.54 August, 4.13 September. 11.22 October. 1.27 November, December. .53 To make the? heavy-rain figur- os more notable, perhaps the eight months should be totalled, "milting October, nnel thi-n yem have S3.H7 inches in e-ight mon- ths. an overage of 6.73 inches Last Ten Years Aycraced 38.52 Further comparison comes with the totals of the Inst 10 years, in general above the aver- age. as follows: 1935 43 G4- 1938 -I 41.66; 1940 4967- 28.96; an average of 38.52 inches. Not entirely incidentally, the year 1945 had its hot and cold days, too. The coldest was on December 19, when n minimum of 8 degrees was recorded; Feb- ruary 28 had offered 15; Septem- ber 1 registered 100 degrees. Peabody Educators To Speak at O.E.A. OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan., 5, (.T) educators from Peabody college, Nashville, Tenn., will speak at the Oklahoma education association convention here Fob 14 and 15. Association Secretary C. M. Howcll announced today 'invita- tions had been accepted by Dr. W. C. Jones, dean of the graeluato school at Peabody; Dr. Louis K. Armstrong, proffesor of education and a former elementary princi- Pedestrian Killed Here Duront Man Into Side of Car, Shock of Ac- cident Believed Death Cause John J. Miller, 54, of 102 East Pine street, Durnnt, was killed at the corner of Sixth and Broad- way Friday night nt 7 o'clock when he walked onto the high- way and into a taxi. Officials said Saturday morning that the taxi did not hit tho man. City police have reports in their office stating that Miller was drunk at the time of the ac- cident or at least by the time he reached a local hospital where he was examined. A doctor's report stated that Miller had no broken bones nnd died of shock. Jay Barton, 500 Cab driver, stopped his taxi almost at the scene of tho accident, loaded Mil- ler into the car and took him to a hospital. Barton local police nnel members of the Oklahoma High- way Patrol who investigated the first fatality in Aela anel I'ontotoc ho was partially blinded by the headlights of an oncoming car. He said that he tried to stop when ho saw the man, anel had sloweel down when Miller walk- ed into the side of the taxi. Beith local authorities nnd mem- bers of the OHP placed no blame on Barton. Jap Executors Are Sought by Americans communities today seeking vic- tims of Texas tornadoes that tnok a toll of 24 known dead last night. Approximately 100 others were injured critically enough to be hospitalized. Hundreds of others were hurt less seriously Lnui'iana Swept By Winds Tornarlic winds, striking along Bayou Teche in the Louisiana Acadian country early today caused damage estimated by town officials nt nbout in St. and vicinity. No one- was n oortrd injured. Most se-riouslv nffecteel nren was in the pine-land foothills of east Texas. Tornadoes struck South view, near Palestine; Claw- son, near Lufkin; and Nacogdo- chos community. There were 13 known dead in Southvicw, 3 in Clawson. 7 in Nacogdoches and 1 in Shilo, Loon county, near Palestine Appleby Hit Also Appleby, near Nacogdoches, was in the path of the storm and t is feared some bodies may be Juried in the wreckage there. The known dead: at South- H. Hondrick, 45; Tea- !ue Wylie, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Morrison and son Charles Ray, 2, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ray, Mary Sue Ray, 10. Richard Lipscomb, 9, Mary and Merle Axum, a man whose last name is Jones, nnd a negro named Nixon. At Roscoc Till, Mrs. William Kirk, Mrs. Oran Bonnie Reagan. Mar- tha Aldridge, Eugene Scroggins. bred bull sold for a new world record price of to George Rodenz, president of a Hereford Association Canada, whose ranch is located near Toronto, Ontario. At Lufkin Mrs. Will Dunn. 35. Mrs. Ed Smith, 51, and Coy Dunn. At unidentified ne- gro boy. Woman Has Serious Injury to Hand Mrs. Barbara Barker Al- most Loses Hand in Hotel Laundry Accident Mrs. Barbara Barker, 400 West Eighth was painfully and serious- ly injured Kature'lny morning about o'clock in the- laundry of the Aldridge when her left hand was caught in a man- gle. It was nl first he-lieved that she might lose her hand, but x-rays nnd examinations proved it not that serious. However, Mrs. Barker will be e-oufim-el to Valley View hospital for four or five weeks, while- skin is being graf- ted onto the injured hand. It is behoved that she will regain complete use of it. Buxlon Sells 50 Herefords First Horse Shoe Ranch Sale ai Part of Hereford Heaven Circuit C. C. Buxton of the Horse Shoe Ranch sold 50 head of females Saturday night for an average of S486.50 as the ranch made its first appearance in the Hereford Heaven sales circuit: however, it was the seventh annual sale for the Horse Shoe Ranch. Cattle offered by the Horse Shne Ranch are of the same high qualitv as oilier cattle in Here- ford Heaven, lut thry were not conditioned in the same manner as other cattle sold in three pre- vious sales. The difference is that the Horse Shoe cattle are fitted for sale in the open pasture and lots while other cattle in the area are fitted for annual sales in barns under near perfect conditions. Buxton was pleaded with the results of his first Hereford Hea- ven sale and has already started making plans for a bigger and better sale next year when he makes his second appearance in the circuit. The Horse Shoe Ranch had no bulls in the Saturday night sale and thus had a nice average for a sale of 50 heifers. The Lazy D Ranch purchased the top two animals offered. The first animal sold for and later the second animal brought More than persons gath- ered at the Armory for the fourth sale. NAVY R ELK A S K R Y AT WEST TULSA SATURDAY WASHINGTON, Jan. The navy nnmmm.Til today it is re leasing the- West Tulsa refinery of the 'lexns Oil C'.'. at a.m. Sunday, upon settle ment'of the- ClO-oilwiirke 1 Some of the royalty from Here- ford Heaven will be leaving the limestone country of Oklahoma but there will probably be no other animals leaving this year. But. the background for breed- ing in Hereford Heaven will no IH? leaving because Gus Delaney snid that he would not set a price on his great herd bull. Beau Zento 54th, which has made his torv and received national rccog nition. Area Shooting For Top Manv cattlemen are in Here- ford Heaven to feel the pulse ol the Hereford industry for 1940 and they are finding that tho count is higher than it was last year. Manv breeders now know that breeders in this area are shooting at nothing but the tops. The sale at the Lazy D Ranch topped the first four sales and if the top averages for National Hereford sales in I94G are about ns they were in 1945 the Delaney average would be in fourth place right behind National West- ern sale at Denver. Colo. Sales Totals Soar A total of worth of stock was sold at the Delaney auction, more than worth of animals were sold by W. E. Harvey for a average and tho Buxton Horse Shoe Ranch sale was third with a total of an average of The previous world's record for beef cattle breeds was re- ceived by Dan Thornton of Gun- whie-h shut elowti the 'plant last Sent. 21. The navy six Texas pal at Durnnt. Okla., and Maycic Soutnall, proffesor of elementary Greater returns for amount in- News-Classified Ads. TOKYO, Sunday. Jan. American authorities are search- ing for Japanese believed res- ponsible for the execution of 38 crewmen who bail o d out of stricken suprrforts over Nagoya irea last summe-r. Seventy American nlrmen were known to have parachuted down nt Nngoyn, Japan's hard-hit hird city. Investigation showed hat 44 survived. Only six were made prisoners of war; tho re- maining 38 were executed, Am- erican investigators believe. Lt. Ralph A. Jones of Pen Ar- gylo. Pa., of General MacAr- hurs legal section, said, "per- sons responsible are being appre- hended end will be prosecuted." Suspects primarily are Japanese army personnel. MacArthur's criminal investi- gation section established that 11 of the airmen received summary trials which lasted about nn hour. They were killed the same day. All 11 were beheaded. Jones said. Most of the remainder wore behoved to have suffered the same death. Bodies were crem- ated nnd the remains scattered. Time of the executions was fixed ns from mid-July to near tho end of tho war. Only 14 of the Americans have been iden- tified positively. Names were withheld. NEW YORK, Jan., 5, Radio telephone service between Japan and the United States will be reopened next Thursday, the American Telephone and Tele- graph company annemr.eed today. company refincrii-s and one- pipeline, together with a total of 54 properties rf major oil com- panies on Oetnhi r 4. The union asked a ,11 per rent increase. It was learned that the Texas scttlcme-nt at West Tulsa was an 18 per rent increa.se. the same compromise reached be- tween the union and the Sin- clear Refining Co. The West Tulsa Refinery pro- duces 16.000 barrels a day and employs 200 workers. (Continued on Page 2 Column 2) Harvey Ranch Sale Launches Series Of Area Auctions The first of n series of five sales in Hereford Heaven was held Friday afternoon at the W. E. Harvey R a n c h. Spectators and buyers braved a drenching downpour to attend which nvrraged the sale, Roy Turner, president of the American Hen-ford Association, and owner of the Turner Ranch, paid for the trp animal sold the Harvey .sale. After the first animal bidding was slow and not ns high as had been expected from the sale that uvoragcd last year to place eighth in all sales in the United States. The highest priced hull went to Don Polio Enid for The average on bulls was S455 while females averaged Mr. Harvey said immediately after the sales that he did not know what happened to his sale because he had offered some fine nnimaN-, nnd many of the heifers were bred to the famed HT Roy- al Rupert. Substitute Carries Away Top Honors; Sale Breaks Own Record Like the substitute halfback that scores the winning touch- down, Lazy D. Rupcrta 15th. from W. A. Delaney's Lazy D jn Ranch, took the place of an in- jured heifer that had been 'tap- ped' for the Hereford Heaven Association sale Friday night__ and brought the top price of. a fast-moving auction, While n two-inch rain drum- med on the high arched roof of the Ada Armory, more than 1 000 people watched with keen inter- est the second association sale. Broke Own Record And they had plenty to watch, for they saw 30 Herefords chcsen from 10 of the ranches scattered through Hereford Heaven bring nn average of which was higher than the average of the 1945 sale which sot a record for consignment typo auctions. They saw C. R. Chief Defend- er 7th, from Colvort Ranch, top the bull sales for with Moss Patterson, owner of Lazy S Ranch near Mill Creek, refus- ing to let tho promising young bull leave Hereford Hcavtn His sale opened the show and tho bidding started briskly Lazy D Ruperta 15th will be a year old Jan. 19. She was pur- chased by Mr. and Mrs. Everett Ingle, Inglcwood Ranch. Ark., who in the last year or two have established themselves as shrewd purchasers of top dual- ity Herefords. Not Too Many Ranches The crowd also heard Col. A. Thompson, who is number one .Hereford auctioneer of the country, say that Herefords in his years sales are bettor qual- ty than ever before. And Dan Thornton. Gunnison. Colo., who has sold two Hereford mils for each, remarked hat no one need worry about oo many Hereford rancliej, that I ho has never seen as heavy a demand for top quality Here- fords or as many men with mon- ey looking for such breeding stock. On and on went the bids as the massive animals moved about the ring under four spotlights bids ranging wide-ly anil sometimes rising in a flurry as a particular- ly desirable standout was brought in. Animals Scattered Widely Seme of the highest quality animals will remain in Hereford Heaven. Others RO to various Places over Oklahoma, and to Il- linois. Texas. Arkansas. Colorado nnrl Tennessee. The association sale is not strictly a consignment sale. It is a elrnft sale-, in which arc offer- ed animals selected by an ssjoct- ation committee from both large pinches and the smaller pure- bred herds that are not large enough yet for their own inde- pendent salts. The committee seeks out the best obtainable outside of res- tricted breeding stock, inasmuch as what goes in the ring at the association sale is representative of a wide spread of Hereford Heaven breeding. Airport Named Chauncey Field, Honors Local Airforce General (WEATHER] ......4 Oklahoma Cloudy Sunday and Monday, with light rain portion Sunday night or Monday, not much temperature change: Maj. Gen. Chauncey Grew Up in Ada Home Still Here; Field Alio To Be Known as Ada Municipal Airport Some time in the future when you get ready to make a trip by air you'll tell the cab driver, "Chauncey Field" and he'll take you out to Ada's municipal air- port north of the city. And some time in the not dis- tant future vou will find there not just a fine arrangement of runways! there will also be han- gars, administration buildings and related facilities for air travel and commerce. Ada city commissioners last week passed n resolution naming the airport the Ada Municipal Airport and Charley Chauncey Held. This section has been taken to honor the soft spoken Ada man who has risen to the rank of major general and who is right hand man to Lt. Gen. Ira Eaker, who in turn is No. 2 man of the U. S. army nir forces now. It honors the airman who sold papers on the streets here as a boj- for a time was a printers devil, later a typesetter when (Continued on Page 2 Column Chocfaw-Chickasaw Meeting Wednesday Members of the Choctaw- Chickasaw Indian Confederation arc urged to attend a meeting Wednesday. Jan. at 2 p.m. in the district courtroom at the I'ontotnc county courthouse. Important business is reported due for cemsideration. TULSA. Okla., Jan. George Ary, truck driver, was charged with murder here today in connect ion with the death o'f William H. Galyean, 56. Ary is alleged to have struck Galyean during a quarrel in a bar on Dec. 27. TH PESSIMIST H2LJ If you like th' unexpected on th' left rear seat with a tobacco chewin' friend at tho steering wheel. Some wives 're so trustin' that they think ther hus- bands are rcferrin' to hot cakes when they ask for another stack" in therfcleep.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication