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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 4, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             H.W. h, Mfc about New H.h year; n..yb. .on., h.v. busy t. figur. up a s.t and prefer no, ,ook back .945 get their idea, ,h.r. Mostly clouilv. scattered thiinilrr storms this afternoon and east tonight. THE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS 42nd Hereford Heaven's Series of Sales Is Under Way Today Harvey Sale Launches January Circuit, Association Sale at Armory Tonight; Two Great Auctions Saturday And One Monday; Many Noted Breeders Attending Sales ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1916 One of Stars in Hereford Heaven FIVE CENTS THE COPST morning the i'-T the Harvey Sale In Good vStart Opens Hereford Heaven Sales; Turner Soys Animals Better Each Year d that held do'.vn ?peice was oc- W.' E. Har-. He Ha d sale at the Ranch near Ada Friday afternoon. U-.ni; held in the vey had eor.itruct- P.T.' Turr.er a t. president of tlic As.-ociation, :ig point an open- en. a: r.mg tnat only -avrn :a'.-.es Herc- for some of nringmg buyers v. ar. Hereford breeders and spectators from 11 states, Canada and Mexico have been Rathering in Ada this week. Friday .started assembling at the E. Harvey ranch f five Hereford Heaven sales. Juan of Sonora. Mexico. arrived in .-Via Friday morning and lias made plans to attend all of the sales in 'Hereford Heaven. lie has a large raiu'ii in Mexico and is making plans to improve it with the quality .stock raised on ranches in this area. George Rocienz, Toronto. Can- ada, has been here since Wednes- day. He purchased several ani- mals at the sales here last year anil has returned to Hereford .'leaven to down the cash for to further improve his herd. Other Buyers nn U'ay Men from North Dakota. Mississippi. Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska. Minnesota, Arkansas. Louisiana. Missouri and Iowa. Other states are expected to be represented at the sales circuit before it ends Monday. Dan Thornton. C.unnison, Colo., has been selected to judge tin- cattle by classes to be placed in the- Hereford Heaven Association j Mile. He is one of tile outstanding breeders of the nation and has made much progress with his Hereford breeding. U-ist year, he three bulls for each. Association Sale Tonight The W. F.. Harvey sale was the first on t.-e circuit and will be followed by the second annual Hereford Heaven Association sale (Continued on Page fl, Col. 2.) Flames Destroy Modern Dairy Barn Of Welch Dairy The Welch Guernsey Dairy barn at Fill-town was destroyed by fire New Year's night, "the loss running into several thous- and It was one of the most modern plants in this part of the state. Origin of the fire has not been definitely d( termined. but Mrs. Welch thinks it was set afire. She says all indications point to gasoline havinc been applied to parts of the building and then .set afire. The concrete floors were damaged as were the concrete walls. The fine barn will be re-built as eiuic'.ly as material can be obtained. Mianwhilc, the milk will not be delivcrul in Ada. As soon as the barn is re-built and icadv for ui.e. delivery in Ada will be resumed. Mr. and Mrs. Welch had no fire insurance- on the property. Housecleaning President Calls On By Japanese American People To Insist Congress Act Is Ordered A star in Hereford Heaven that owned by the Lazy D Ranch is Del Xcnto 1st, listed "in the Lazy D catalogue for 'reference Tho bull was sired by Beau and the dam was T. R. Lady eel March 13. and was shown in the sale last year. A number of. cattlemen tried to persuade Jack Smith, ranch manager, to put the animal in the sale last year, but he refused, even after a.-.d he P. J. "A "W'K'Y r. i-i inn to the fact that eat- -d h: jire belter offei.-ci a year ago, a n: :r. ;i 15 alrer.dy being i for i-.'-xt January will i'-pcrior to Rupert 4th. Del Zento was calv-1 being guaranteed an opening bid Bob White, Chicago, Is Back Wearing That Cowboy Hat; Public Invitation of Several breeders have requested thai the animal be put in the sale this year, but Smith has not agreed to sell the animal. The bull will be shown and may be sold at the Lazy D Ranch sale Saturday. o G'lr.r.is'-ri. f the A. H. A. at 12 7.0. in charge, had Harvev. W. A. IJaa Thornton. tc> R E" H .r- to1..-] a heifer, Turner ranch for S2.7UO D (Deiar.evi followed i STafl bid for r: T. G. Ec-nd Wails. Sul- a choice heifer for SSOO, Homma Gave March Order Member of His Staff Says He Ordered Infamous Bataan Death March MANILA. Jan. 4. l.t. j (ien. Masahru Homma himself gave the order for the infamous death march that killed thous- ands on the trewn route from Dataan to Camp O'Donnell in April, one of his staff officers testified at Hr.mma's war-crimes trial today. And neither Homina nor staff cared what happened to Grove. i or.? for 5550 and T Texas. another State's Broomcorn Crop Down in 1945 Almost 50 Per Cent Below 1944, Weather Blamed AHOMA i. L 1 W Color. CITY. Jan. 1 ''if) b: o nr.eo: n 1--I1 almost .111 I'll-l har- fur the l.'.S. icultui e leporl- led all oth- was second s Tins year's v. .-e. l.lanii'-d nn eather at 1 unii ual r.tin v :ivi dunrii; the if spring .r.er r-.ar.v ;.crt. i inter.ried for .rr.cnrn v.e-e planted late, replant', (i one more or rut planted at all. 74.'. re h 22 10-vear Quahtv reported sted i-r than year below pounds an i5 pounds in average of of the 194.1 fairly good Negro Confesses To Tulsa Killing Tl'LSA. Okla.. Jan. 4. '.Ti County Attorney Dixie Gilmer said today a negro arrested on a peace disturbance charge con- fo.'oed he killed Lee Kllis Barnes. I :io. in a New Year's argument' a debt. Gilmr-r ciuotej the suspect as! Baying in a sinned statement that he went to the gasoline station j where Ilarnes was employed to collect lie said the war vet- eran owed him. Harnes "went to fighting me." Gilmer said the statement con- tinued, and "I pulled out my gun. throw the shell into the barrel anj shot him.'' his the emaciated American and Filipino prisoners, the witness. Lt. Col. Michio Kitayama. asserted. Kit- ayama, a communications officer i at Homma's 14th imperial army said he saw the march from several successive vantage points along the road. Tho once-arrogant Homma lis- tened meekly to the testimony. Kitayama's Ksponsrs to prese- ;cution questions did not swerve from a previously-recorded de- position in which he as-erted that the Japanese altitude to- ward prisoners was not one of "too great concern." "This prevailed all through the 'Japanese) he explained, because Homma's men were busy n ducinj; C'orri'gidor and because of the Japanese belief that any soldier who surrendi rs has com- mitted a shameful act and deser- ves punishment. Homma as commander of the Japanese army bore responsibil- ity "for the whole action of hi-; men" ni rarryini; out his orders, Kitayama said in reply In one question. Hut Japanese law. he andid, dors nr.t consider him as criminally liable for their der ils. This answer was hurriedly shushed by Maj. Gen. Leo Dono- van. president of the trial com- mission, and stricken from the i icord. Hob White, official of the Am- erican Broadcasting company, Chicago, arrived in Ada today. He is wearing the cowboy hat given to him last year by the Ada Chamber of Commerce when he made his first visit to Ada in connection with the first nationwide hookup for broadcast of a Hereford Heaven sale. White didn't have room for the hor.ts that went along with the hat. Incidentally, he doesn't sit around waiting to be told about a spare time last Truman Names Housing Goal Sets Emergency at 000 New Homes, Gov- ernment May Provide Them By STERLING F. GRKF..N year he gnt nut and wnlkcd many blocks.seeing what Ada was like and said later that he liKed what son w. Wyatt. Jr.. with he saw. Blond Lines Important What's all this talk about Ru- perts and Domino and Hazlctt, with maybe some remarks about Tone and Bocaldo? Well, there are certain major strains Unit have been develoncd i among the finest Hereford beef cattle- of America, and certain great animals have so helped es- tablish top types in their descen (hints that their lines carry names. And those names mran a lot to a prospective buyer of an ex- pensive animal. The well vcr.-rd Hen ford men can look at an animal and point out differences in color, in short- ness of neck and so on thai the average outsider hadn't noticed, but each characteristic being found in the descendants of some great sire. ll'.s Inside Let it rain, the 'fans' will be dry at the Hereford Association sale at the Government Miyht Seize Meat Plants OFFER EXPIRES JANUARY 13, 1946 Ada Evening News Christmas Bargain Offer CLIP and MAIL Ada Evening Ada, Oklahoma Gentlemen: Attached find 3------------ (check or money order) for which rr.ter my subscription to the Ada Evening News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL r] By carrier in Ada, or Q by mail anywhere OUTSIDE Pontotoc and ad- joining counties. per year Name Strwt Number or R.F.D. Town State If Mediation, Fact-Finding Fail to Avert Strike WASHINGTON. Jan. The labor department forecasts that, if mediation and fact-find- ing fail to avert a threatened strike in the meat packing indus- try, government seizure will be a last resort. This was made known last night by Kdgar L. Warren, chief of the federal conciliation serv- ice, after a late afternoon confer- ence with Secretary of Labor Schwellenbaeh. Warren told reporters that the labor department will not rec- ommend seizure of the meat packing plants, but that such a proposal might come from Sec- retary of Agriculture Anderson. On Wednesday Anderson .said that the government could not permit a meat tie-up. PLAN "PAPKR FOR HIUSTO1V OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan., 4, Articles of incorporation were issued by Frank C, Carter, secre- tary of state, to James C. Nance, Purcell publisher, and Joe W. Mcfiride and Wallace Kidd. Ana- for-the Bristow Publish- ing Co., a corporation authorized to publish a newspap- I cr and operate a radio .station in Bi istow. mis- i m'V north of Ada Friday night. Inside the spacious building bleachers have been set up to take care of 800 persons. The auction ring, the auction- eer's stand, tie racks and other furnishings that make the .setting for the sale have been in place several days. And Ada people who can't get away to the ranch sale-; are in- vited to be at the Association sale at the Armory Friday night or the Horse Shoe Ranch sale of Saturday night in the same sett- Navy Hearing End 91 Atoll Search Has Been Combing Thou- sands of Islands, Atolls For Missing Men WASHINGTON-. Jan.. 4, Setting an emergency goal of 000.000 new homes, president Truman served notice that the government will provide them if private enterprises cannot. Tho chief executive gave a fly- ing start to the career of his em- housing expediter, Wil- .....j.......... with a promise broadcast to the nation last night that Wyatt has a his disposal i agency of the government more and every resource of the govern- ment." Wyatt, former mayor of Louis- ville, Ky.. was bare'ly settled in new quarters at the o'ffice of war mobilisation and reconversion when Mr. Tn.rnan made his first "fireside chat" report to the peo- ple. In it. he named housing as the their j "most, difficult problem" among the three major elements of the stand; rd of cloth- ing and shelter. The New Year will bring peak food production. Mi-. Truman predicted, and satisfactorily out- put of ainiarcl. "but in housing the situation is diferent." Fmphai-.izing that ad- ditional homes are "urgently needed-now" the president not- ed that the biggest pre-war year's construction produced fewer than a million I "II clear he add- I ed. "that this is an emergency problem which calls for an cin- ergoncy method of solution. We must utilize the same imagination, the same determination that back nnt in enabled us to raise our sights to overcome the Nazi and Japanese military might." (Private building organizations have estimated that the construc- tion industry cannot provide more than new homes this year, 750.000 in and 1 000.000 in Mr. Truman said his 5.000.000 figure did not include replace- ment of millions of sub-standard dwellings in cities and on farms which ultimately will have to be replaced. MacArthur Directives Means Getting Rid of Ultra- Militarist Persons, Societies j By RUSSELL BRINKS TOYKO, Jan., 4. MacArthur today decreed a dras- tic "housecleaning" of Japan's government, and premier Shide- hara's cabinet called an emer- gency Cession .for tomorrow to consider methods of compliance. taunting informed quarters, the Japanese news agency Kyodo said that the two new directives or- dering a purge of all men who led Japan into war would affect practically every member of the present government. It except- ed specifically only premier Ki- juro Shidehaia. foreign minister Shigeru Yoshida and justice isler Chuzo Iwata. i Toyko newspapers interpreted the allied orders as a move to give Janan new leaders, and Kyodo said the first reaction among pol- iticians was one of bewilderment. Present Diet Members 'Out' It quoted a member of the pro- gressive party as saying "this practically means that all memb- ers of the present diet will not be able to run in the coming elec- tion. Even if they did run, they will not have a chance." The directive ordered the gov- ernment to abolish all ionalist, terrorist and militarist groups or .societies and to oust from public office and influence persons who "deceived and mis- led the people of Japan into em- barking on work) conquest." The directive picked up where the war criminal lists left off. The new move makes the first incision into encrusted bureau- crats and politicians controlling the government. The consterna- tion in public offices probably w-il be matched by the people's applause. Allied Impatience The new orders serve notice of allied impatience with Japanese efforts to rid themselves of pcr- sonnages and organizations in- strumental in the militarist era. Patrotic societies, such as the Black Dragon, supposedly have been dissolved. But the Japanese press reports at least eight of than 30 current political parties are led by former right- ists. The first immediate effect of the orders will be to disqualify dozens of the strongest candidates from old line parlies form com- ing national elections. This will widen the field for the indcpen- the extensiveness of political machines opposing them. It will minimize the hold over influence of the "Tojo diet." Says Action in Congress Distressingly Slow on Most Of His Reconversion Measures Badly Needed Now; Labor Disputes Settled, Prices Kept on Even Keel By U. HAROLD OLIVER WASHINGTON, Jan. Truman call- ed on the American people today to domnnd more action and less talk from congress on legislation to lessen strikes. He also told the nation in a half-hour radio address last night that "time is running out" on most of his other recon- version measures because action in senate and house has been "distressingly slow." Navy Patrol Sent Wrong Opposite Direction to Japs Approaching P. H.; Yanks Expected Japs to Come Back Charges Filed On Kirkpalrick Here Accused of Assault With Deadly Weapon in Sat- urday Night Gunplay PKARL HARBOR. Jan. 4.-'.T> navy is ni a ring the end of one of its greatest fruitless search of the thousands of islands and atolls that stud the Pacific for missing men of the A black purse stolen from the- armed forces. [office of Fred Andrews, local at- bpccially trained parties, opcr- I torney. was recovered Tuesday Charges uf assault with a dead- ly weapon have been filed against Howard Kirkpatrick in the justice court of Kranklm Bourland by Jimmy Dean, assist- county attorney. Charges were filed in connection with a gun wound received by Highway By JACK BELL WASHINGTON. Jan. Congressional investigators heard i ultra-Hat- i today that Hawaii's defenders' fully expected the Japanese to come back promptly after the Pearl Harbor attack and called I desperately for more f i g b I e r j planes and anti-aircraft guns to meet the anticipated second as sault. This information went into the record along with the word that that fatal Sunday morning December 7, liltl, the navy flew a Ill-plane patrol in just the op posite direction from which the Japanese task force was advanc ing. Report Hitherto Srcrct The source of these details was the hitherto secret report the late Secretary of the Navy Knox made to President Roosevelt soon after his' return from a flying trin to the scene of the disaster. Senator Ferguson who obtained the report from navy files, said it differed from the one made public at the time. Admiral Harold R. Stark, chief of naval operations in 1941. told the committee that IIP had never seen the Knox report to Mr. Roosevelt until today. He said Knox had filled him in on some details in conversations. Knox told Mr. Roosevelt that both the commanders at Pearl Harbor. Admiral Husband E. Kimmel and Maj. Gen. Walter C. Short, were completely sur- prised. Third Wave Turned Bark Other points of the Knox re- port included: 1. Nothing but "ineffective ma- chine gun fire" met the first of three waves of attacking Japan- ese planes, but the third wave was turned back. 2. American radio and other equipment were recovered from the wreckage of Japanese planes. One had n Lewis gun of v Ullage. :t. Knox attributed the lack of adequate fighter plane strength on Oahu before the war to diver- sion of aircraft to the British, Chinese and the Russians. Stolen Purse Is Found, (ash Gone War Bonds, Valuable Pa- pers, Endorsed Check Re- covered for Owner Patrolman Harvey Hawkins at the Broadway club Saturday night. Kirkpatrick and another man were arrested following a gun plav incident during which Pa- trolman Hawkins suffered a hand injury. Authorities said that three shots were fired at the club. The two men were arrested by members of the highway patrol and placed in tho city jail Sat- urday night in connec'ion with the shooting. They were later taken to the county jail where they were released a short time after being placed in a cell. OKLAHOMA 4 L a y m o n d Camnbell :iH. Bethany, was killed today when his automobile skidded and over- turned. Greater returns for amount in- News Classified Ads. Klectrical engineering depart- ment at Yale IJniver.sitv has de- veloped spark plugs with elec- trodes that grow with use in- stead of wearing away. They are used in a new ignition system which fires them by radio fre- quency currents. ating from destroyers and small amphibious craft, have been ran- sacking the out-of-the-way plac- rs of the Pacific for men who vanished during the war and who might have made it to land. On five islands they found the graves of allied fliers whose planes crashed or evidence that j the fliers met death, but no sur- vivors. The parties have ques- I Honed natives and Japanese mil- itary personnel in addition to making a painstaking search. Silicon? oils, suitable for use as hydraulic fluids in aircraft systems, will flow at 121 degrees below Fahrenheit. So deadly is the new re- denticide developed during the war by U. S. government agen- cies, that only professional rat killers and other pest ex- terminators will be allowed to buy it for civilian use. near the railroad tracks on North Broadway. Nine dollars in cash was the only item missing from the Andrews said that she hud several hundred dollars worth of War Bonds and some valuable papers in the purse. The bonds were missing from the purse, but wire found at the post office where they bad been shoved through a slot for letters. A check for a large Mim of money was not bothered even though it was ndorr.ed anil could have been cashed handily. CHICKASHA, OklaT Jan. Students at Oklahoma Col- lege for Women will resume their Monday following a two- week Christmas vacation. "Butvl." a snvthetic rublx-r. is derived almost entirely from re- finery gases that go into manu- facture of aviation gaiolma. cloudy, scattered thunder storms this afternoon and east tonight, warm- er east this afternoon; cooler west tonight; low west, middle SU'.s east: Saturday partly cloudy, rain northeast, "and forenoon; cooler west and central: utlook for Sunday partly cludy and mild. Soil Conservation May Become Part 01 School Study OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. educators will be asked to make the .study of soil conservation a part of the public school curriculum at a series of conferences starting Jan. IB. E. E. Harris, assistant staU su- perintendent of public instruc- tion, said the first meeting will be held at Muskpgec or Tahlc- quah. Other sessions will be at Wilburton and Miami. Schcol superintendents, prin- cipals and teachers will be in- vited to confer with federal soil conservation officials, county farm agents and experts from Oklahoma A. and M. college and the University of Oklahoma. "We hope to put soil conser- vation on the curriculum of even the elementary grades and then teach it right Harris said. "The plan is to make everyone conscious of the great need for conservation and of the terrible I waste of soil through erosion.1' State Veterinary Association Meets Congress returns January 14 from its holiday adjournment. "Unless we can soon meet the job of obtaining full production and employment at home." Mr. Truman asserted, "we shall face serious consequences. They will be serious not only in what they mean to the, American people as such, but also in what they can do to our position as a leader among the nations of the world." Therefore, in this "year of de- Mr. Truman" turned to "the most powerful pressure group in the Ameri- can great mass of citizens who have rto special interests, whose interests are only the interests of the nation as a whole." Not All Promises Kept The president expressed deep concern over present and threat- ened strikes in the auto, steel, electrical and meat packing in- dustries, declared that war-end promises of cooperation from members of congress, industry, labor and farm groups "have not all been and concluded: "We cannot shirk leadership in the post war world. The prob- lems of our economy will not solved by timid men, mistrustful of each other. We cannot face in a spirit of drift or irre- solution." In his address, Mr. Truman said that of equal impor- tance with settlement of manage- ment-labor disputes is the ques- tion o! keeping prices on an even keel. Hit's Pressure Groups Hitting at "pressure groups" which he said are lobbying to (Continued on page 2. col. 5) More Than Workers Idle As New Disputes Rise IIr Anonrliilrd New and continuing labor dii- putes keep idle more than O'Jlt workers-. Major labor developments: Tru- man, in radio address, peo- pie to press congress into action on legislation aimed to curb strikes and labor unrest. Communications possibility remains of nation wide walkout of telephone workeis m sympathy with strike by employees in western electric company plants in New York an-t New Jer.-ey over wage dispute; new stoppage would affect 000 telephone employes. Trend of balloting by 50.000 AKL employes of Western Union telegraph company outside New York City indicates, say union officials, they will accept War Labor Hoard wage directive and call off strike set for January T; however. CIO Western Un- ion employes in New York plan walkout on Tuesday. Farm of 30.- BOO CIO employes in 11 Interna- tional Harvester company plants threatens as wage negotiations collapse; union to set strike date Sunday. Mine Mill and Smelter Workers Union in Salt Lake City strike for January 21 affecting of its Utah mem- tiers. In Akron. O., the ClO-United [lubber Workers local at Good- vcar Tire and Rubber Co., plan- ned a strike vote Sunday by (Continued on Page 2. Column 3) FORECAST FOR JANI'AKY t-8 Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and rain in Mis- souri, eastern Kansas and eastern Oklahoma Saturday and general rain or snow in Nebraska. Kan- sas, Oklahoma and Missouri again Monday or Tuesday, with a- moiint totaling above normal; colder trend Saturday and Sun- day and again Tuesday or Wed- nesday; temperatures slightly above normal. OKLAHOMA CITY. Jan. annual convention of the Oklahoma veterinary medical association will be held here Monday and 'luesday with veterinarians expected to attend. Dr. James Farquliarson, Fort Collins. Colo., president of the American veterinary medical as- sociation, and Dr. C. S. llryim, Kast Lansing, Mich., will speak. Dr. Herman Karliv of Okla- homa A. ami M. college. Stilt- water, will discuss anaplasmosis, average I a disease which has frequently I ravaged state cattle. TH' PESSIMIST nob niiaiu, Jr. Th' stomach is 'n organ that you dump things in an' often Mum's more sense than you do by dumpin' 'em right back out. When Ih' average feller kisses 'is wife time he starts for th' office thev'vn iest been married cr they've jut made up.   

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