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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1946 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - January 3, 1946, Ada, Oklahoma                             .e. r.0. ef _ Continued mild tonight and Friday except considerable cloudiness extreme cast FHE ADA EVENING NEWS BUY MORE WAR BONDS ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 19-Jfi Hereford Heaven Welcomes Buyers To Five Auctions Area, Now Among Leaders in Hereford Breeding, Mecca for Buyers from Many Places Seeking Best In Fine Hereford Stock; First Two Sales on Friday "Hereford Hr.-iveii has become the indicator for other in that nation ;md at the .same time has become a na- ti-.ria! Jin-.eliRh'. for Hereford breeders all over the nation ]t.ok for :md have leadership in Hereford Dan Tho.-r.io.M of GunnLson, Colo, who sold three animals during the past 12 rr.onths for each, said Thursday. Every Hereford Heaven breeder agrees that the animals to A. I Sales to Be Well 'Aired' ABC to Put One Sale On Nationwide Broadcast; State Stations Plan IJHO.WAST 'NOISKD AHItOAI) the Livestock News Service. Denver. Colo., an- u-ade-r.-. tiie nutionwide AUC broadcast of part of iiiey. Jr. l.a.-y D Ranch ?ale of Saturday: river Ihe nation will hear the chant of the auc- :r bv radi'i when the purebred Hereford auction at the P. is held Saturday. Jan. 5. iieiily-bn-il modi-rii beef pattern He-re-fords will ti.e aiictmn img at the prominent ranch in the heart -.at is kr.o-.'.n in tattle circles as "Hereford Heaven." The :.an Company will broadcast the auction r naTi'.n. b-gmmnfi at a. m. and Station WKY .carry tr.e auction from to I p. m.. but hundreds of lerr.en cl-.oiee breeding stock will not be content to r-y radio be in attendance at the ringside to pick l.'.e an ay nf sire Del Zentn 1st may be off'jred to is due to multiply the attendance. bo ing offered in the- Hereford Heaven Association sale this year be ns much ns 50 per cent better than offered in trie- sale la.st As in every sale, there will be nothing but the top animals in the area offered, Since fome of the most out- I standing Here-fords in the nation are found in Hereford Heaven; an official of the American Here- ford Association said that I folks in Hereford Heaven are do- I ing more to promote the Here-1 j ford breed than any other group! i of breeders in the United States. They're Here Some of the persons attending; the Hereford Heaven sales cir- i cuit include Ross Phar, Wayne Smith, P. H. Stephens, Albert Noe j of Jackson. Tenn.. former owner of the famous old Milky Way farm: Mrs. Rupert Harkrider. Mrs. Fay Young Morton, Dr. and Mrs G. C. Wood, Don Tellow. L. E. Hawkins. J. O. Dickey, J. H. Ahnberg. Clarence Buck, J. L. Cook, Charley Lewis, George Tel ford, R'. T. Alexander. Melvin Jones. Art Beal, Paul Blenkin, Joe Barton. Uavie Carter, R. D. Cravens. Charley Korkcl, Roy Farrar. R. D. Ealey, Paul Fergu- son, George Graff, Ernest Gris- som. T. D. Haney, Mason King, Hank Herbcr, Ed Hisle and Ar- thur Hale. Where and When Following is the Hereford Hea- ven sale calendar: January 4. Friday, p. in, W. K. Harvey Ranch. January 4, Friday, B p. m Hereford Heaven Association at the Armory north of Ada. January-5. Saturday, a. m.. Lazy D Ranch. January 5. Saturday, 7 p. m.. Horse Shoe Ranch at the Armory north of Ada. January 7. Monday, p. m Turner Ranch. George Rodenz. of Toronto, Canada, president of the Here- ford Association in that area, is already in Ada and has been looking over some of the animals I that will be offered for sale. He purchased several thousand dol- lars worth of pure bred stock to return to his ranch in Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Everett Ingle of Mcna. Ark., heavy buyers in re-- cent Hereford Heaven sales, are in Ada again this year to at-j tend the sales. Buyers from all sections of the' nation have already started ar-' riving in Ada for 'the Hereford Heaven sales circuit and more are expected to be in the area be- fore the first sale starts Friday afternoon. Every breeder in the area is of two r.ci a national Hereford Hea- by many >le not niily in ery .state in A r-'iMr.n of fiiot -..le of Here.', rci Heaven cli- ent W. E. Harvey ranch he through the fa- f.f WKY in Oklahoma Eri farm editor. c'r.arg'.- of the broad- ea.-t. Tr.e time has not been ar-.r.-j-jr.eeci. KVOO in lul-a will a delayed broadcast f.-f.-i Harvrv Ranch. t nd rjr. ll-.v. en As- n rale, v. ill not be bioa-l- at 1 :.'U) tie National Hnur a nationwide ti-.e D n program similar broadcast of he cani'd by ns (i! the Ame-ri- company. lie no broadcast e Si-.ne Ranch sale The s.-ile- .starts at Arn.nry r.i'rth of Visitors To Sales C-C Guests They're Here from Notable Hereford Centers For Livestock Auctions W. A. Delaney, Jr., immediate past pirsident of the Hereford Heaven Association and owner of the Lazy D. Ranch, introduced vir.iting dignitaries of the Here- ford cattle breeders to members of the Ada Chamber of Com- merce. Dan Thornton, nationally fam- ous Hereford breeder from Gun- nison, Colorado, termed his visit to Ada and Hereford Heaven a "pleasure." (Thornton sold thrro bulls during 1045 for S50.000 each, an all-time high for any breed.) In praise of this area Thorn- Inn said: "All of the Hereford breeders look forward to visiting Aria. This Hereford Heaven thing is a thing that kind of grows on everybody It's gotten to be that way all over the country. Everywhere you go vou hear of it You fore Heaven) occupy the nation- al limelight." Everett Ingel. lumberman and owner of a famous Hereford ranch near Mena. Arkansas, said: "We appreciate the nice gestures extended during all the years I've been coming here." George Rodenz. president of the Canada Hereford Breeders' Association and prominent cat- tleman of Canada, was intro- duced to the Chamber of Com- merce. Rodenz' home is in Tor- onto, Ontario. Delanrv invited Allans to see the ranchers and auctioneer in action at the armory Friday night at 8 o'clock, when the draft sale! of prize Hercfords begins. j C. C. Buxton, owner of Horse- shoe Ranch; W. E. Harvey, own- er of W. E. Harvey Ranch; and Jack Smith, manager of Lazy D Ranch invited those who want to see the auctions at the individual ranches to attend. Boy to Have Plastic Skull FIVE CENTS THE COPX Anti-Aggression Pact Is Submitted By U. S. MacArthur Argues Policy Of Using Jap Government to Put Orders in Effect Paying Off J.', "1-7 other races and fated to rule the Six-year-old Norman Turner was born with scaphoccphalus. a rare skull condition which necessitated removal of most of the bone from the top of his head in order to relieve threatened prcs- r "f'-100 tllc missli'K skull, Irvinq A. Gold- man of Arlincton, Va., plans to provide the boy with one of plastic. Above, he, displays a plaster cast of the artificial skull to Norman ana his mother, Mrs. Laura Turner, a graduate nurse. Homma Knew Wants Look Conditions At Documents Traveled 20 Miles Down Highway While "Death March" Was in Progress P. H. Committee Wants To See What Acheson Re- fused; Kimmel Had Stark Confidence Aussie V.'K-HITA. K.-i, if ii.e Hereford broadcast liti's WKY. rum the Turner Monday. Y.ink Wife AiMra- a-ke-i May- File Discharges For Records Here They're still coming out of uniform into civilian life and re- cording their discharges at the county clerk's office here. In the last sever..! days 55 men have so recorded their discharg- es. Of them, one was in the Ma- rine corps 21 in the navy and in the army. The lone ex-Marine is Cecil V. Hallum C. Patterson, Woodrov W. Whittington Clif- ford A. Hatcher. Herman E. Mill- er. Fred L. St.ilnaker. Walter R. cd these conditions to Homma's McCracken. Aubrey C. Harris, I headquarters but nothing was done. His statement that Homma's interest in prisoners was "very thin" was quoted by prosecutors from nn earlier, written state- ment, nnd Takatsu today declined to elaborate. He explained to Prosecution Questioner Lt. Ben- iamin F. Schwarts. Los Angeles, that he was "honor bound" not to speak badly of Homma in the latter's presence. More Details of Prosecutions Defense counsel had objected filed against Homma in his trial that many of the specifications "for violations of the laws of By JAMES HALSEMA MANILA. Jan. WASHINGTON. Jan. ese Lt. Gen. Masaharu Homma congressional committee in must have seen orders for the brutal "death march" of Ameri- cans and Filipinos from Bataan in but had "a very thin in- terest'1 in his captives, one of his former officers" testified Homma's war-crimes trial open- ed today. The witness, Maj. Gen. Toshim- itsu Takatsu, said1 that Homma's headquarters on Bataan were less than 500 yards from the death-march route, and that Hamma traveled 20 miles down the highway while the prisoners were driven mercilessly along it 300 Died Dally Describing the deal h rate among captives as 300 daily at the O'Donnell prison camp. Ta- katsu sairl medicines were "not sufficient." and "I think there was a lack of fond, which was mostly rice. Also, there was not much water." He said he report-1 d, James O Adair iur violations or tne laws of i American r "F. Waner, Clyde Colt- I were vague, anrl the war began and ert I Jones Leehman Prosecutors introduced addition- could not see ho ell, John A. Hiliburton. al I possibly be consid "A fm, to 2 r !o th'- nf S.ilfas. 1 m DC rial Qucr-nsland. is 23 and 'Continued on Page 2 Column OFFKR JANUARY 13, 1946 Ada Evening News Christinas Bargain Offer CLI Pond MAIL Ada Evening News, Ada. Oklahoma Gentlerr.cn: Attached find (check or money order) for v.-hich cnti-r my subscription to the Ada Evening News to be delivered as indicated below. BY CARRIER OR MAIL Ry carrier in Ada. or Q by mail nnw.i-ere OLT.SIDE Pontotoc and ad- counties. Number or R.F.D. Town State Charles H. Vincent. James G. Ste- jvenson, Miles A. McCauley, Hugh B. Warren, LukcB.Dobbs Wayne H. Wilkcrson. David M. Clark, i Wiley L. McCraw. Eugene W. Bingham, Carl M. Johnston. Ro- bert D. Lawrence, Thomas H. Dcam. Orel W. Busby and Robert L. Meek. 1 W. Daniel. Ray E. Smith, Charley B. Whisen- himt. Tom Harris. Cleo Chism, Albert T. Woolly, Leonard E. Caldwell. James B. Clark. James E. Orcbaugh, Torn D. Wilson, i Bentin I. McCauley. Aubrey R. Rutherford, James O. Adair, Ralph G. man. Robert E. Campbell, John A. Hiliburton. Jr.. Ray M. Watson. Luther S. Hawkins. Tony C. Foxx. M. L. Hall. Alfred E. Masscy. Kelly O. Spann, AnJlrew J. Hilton. Jei'e D. Johnson, Herman W. Wilhitc, Billie- K. McHurd, Howard W. Vandergriff. L D. Nickell. Clarence C. McKinley. Paul A. Black. Everett E. Bra- den. George C. Elevens. County Surges Far Past Bonds Quota Final Day of Buying Sends Already Over-Top Figures Farther Beyond Goals It took many days to do it, but Pontotoc county in the closing days of the Victory Loan surged past the quota of 'E' bonds to just under 114 per cent of goal in that division. Dec. 31. final day of the loan. 1 saw go into individual I type bonds, boosting to 07HJH the total; the 'E' quota was The county had already gone far beyond its quota for other types of bonds and finished on Dec. .11 with investina of Pearl Harbor took steps today to got a look at docu- ments which Rep. Kecfe (R-Wis) asserted the state department re- fused to show him. Kenfe complained in open sess- ion that information he knew was revelant to the inquiry had been dubbed irrevelant by Un- der Secretary of State Dean Ach- eson. Specifically, Keefe said, he wanted to see a memorandum which he said was prepared by- Lawrence Salisbury about three months prior to Salisbury's res- ignation from the far eastern section of the state department. Keefe Point" Chairman Bark ley (D-Ky) agreed that Keefe a point. He asked committee Counsel William D. Mitchell to gel the memorandum and submit it to the committee in executive ses- sion. "It has been a misunderstand- ing all along." Barkley said, "that the committee, and not the secretary of state or any other secretary shall determine what is relevant." Keefe brought up his com- plaint as tile committee resumed questioning of Adm. Harold R. Stark, chief of naval operations at the time the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor December 7 Department Deciding Material Keefe said Acheson had in- formed him through Mitchell that the Salisbury memorandum dealt with exchange of Japanese and American nationals after and that Acheson General MacArthur contends that his policy of using the Japanese government to execute his ers is paying off. The supreme e o m in a n d- er makes tin? point in his first report on Janpanese occupation, covering the initial two months after the landing last August 30. The report was released here by the war department. MacArthur said bluntly it is policy "to use, not support, Ihe existing government in Japan, and to permit and favor changes in the form of government iniat- ed by the Japanese people or government in the direction of modifying its feudal and author- itarian tendencies." Illnihlto Giving In (On New Year's day Emperor Hirohito issued a rescript re- nouncitn: the myth of his per- sonal divinity. ties between us and our people have always stood upon mutual trust and the- re-script said. "They do not de- pend upon mere legends and myths. They are not predicated on the false conception that the emperor is divine and that the Japanese people are superior to Military control has been Im- ord-1 posed upon the government structure-, but there has been minimum interference with tin- existing administration, the gen- wrote. He added: Saves t.'se of Yanks "Not only has this policy at- tained the desired ends, but it has avoided the use of hundreds has avoided the use of tr of thousands of person. .-1 which1 for cone would have been required had i action to thwar the- basis structure of the Jap- I aggression anyw anese government been re-con-I "Vli stitutcd and replaced" made publr Mac-Arthur's renort Hemisphere Treaty Sought United States Offers Latin- American Except Proposal By NOKMAN CARIGNAN WASHINGTON. Jun. All Latin American governments except Argentina todav pondered. ;i United States-proposed treaty concert- thwart or anywhere stitutcd and replaced.' Mac-Arthur's report hold out no ligh hope for an immediate trend to democracy in Japan because the people "have had no exper- ience with it in any way" and the government has little toward flctnncratic reform. Hut if democracy can't he im- posed directly, the American GIs of the occupation force are de- monstrating it, the general said. He added that the conduct of the troops is "exemplary." The report, written well before the recent Moscow conference which resulted in an allied con- ______________________ (Continued vn Page 2 Column 4) Truman Taking His Program to People Speaks to Nation at 9 P. M. in Appeal for Support To Break Legislative Jam Holding Up His Proposals WASHINGTON, Jan. Truman's re- port to the nation by radio tonight will deal with the "whole labor the White House said today. VJ practically Ware, Resident 01 Ada Since 1912, Dies at Home Here I.onnie Warr, resident of since died Wednesday about H o'clock al his home. West Ninth. He had been criti- cally ill for two days but had been- in ill health for several! years. Funeral arrangements will announced later by Crlswcll Fun finished the half hour talk, to start at p.m.. CST, when he began receiving his first callers this morning. He saw no visit- ors yesterday after returning from a four-day river cruise. I The speech has been desci ib- ed by party leaders as an over- all report on the president's leg- proposals and an effort by the chief executive to stimu- 1 'at appeal to that this _ reflected in congress, his program has bogged i down. bei HLs Own Speech ________ ___ _.............. Asked at his news conference cral Home: Dr. C. C. Morris will whether the speech would officiate and burial will be in current labor-manage Rose-dale cemetery here. He was born in Fayette county, Tennessee, in March" of 1871. lie public hv Latin American diplomats, will considered at the forthcoming Rio De Janeiro conference sched- uled for early spring. Diplomatic authorities consider this country's suggestion as a runmiii! mate to the recent Uru- guayan proposal calling for col- lective action in this hemisphere again.st any nation which disre- gards its international obligations or denies human lights to its own people. Companion Plan Not Accepted The United States' treaty, these authorities say. would take care of the purely military side a{ ae- iion. while the Uruguayan prot sal would deal with the pol- itical phases of conditions lead- ing to war. The Uruguay plan, however, has received a frigid Latin reception although this country pledged its ''unequivo- cal" support. Tlie suggested military treaty is designed to continue in force the act of Chanultcpec. adopted at the Mexico City inter-Ameri- can conference List March. While calling for the peaceful settlement nf disputes, the pro- posal provides for immediate as- sistance by the Americas in cases of armed attack either from within or without the hemis- phere. Defines Armed Attack As soon as possible thereafter consultations would be held "to examine measures that may have already been taken in agreeing upon collective measures." A two-thirds be neces- sary for agreement. The proposal, defining arm >d attack as "invasion of territory by the armed forces of any slate." carefully nvoids use of th'c word "aggression" which remains undefined under the United Na- lor moved to' Texas, served iii flic-! covered. Spanish American War, return-1 was asked if a speech of ed to Texas and was married at 'J1IS '.VPC is normally cleared Corsicann in 1809. through the democratic national The family moved to Stonewall headquarters for sug in Indian Territory a few years later and to Ada in 1912. 'He-re- he worked some years as a bar- ber, then operated a taxi, one of American diplomats described the decision not to give Argen- tina a copy as being in line with Ihe administration's politcal cold- Secr'et'-Trv treatment of the Farrcll DtLii.iii p Charles G. Ross replied that the C ''whole labor situation" would be inent strife, Press the first auto 'jutneys' in Ada. Several years aco he retired because of failinc health. He In establishing "widespread rapine and brutal mistreatment of American anrl Filipino wom- they said, they would offer proofs that such actions, for which they blame Homma. in- cluded the "inhuman" treatment of an unnamed, married Ameri- can woman at the swank Rosario annrtmcntr two davs after the fall of Manila. As the result of her treatment, they said, the woman was sent to an asylum as insane. Polish Jews Pour Info Yank Zone UNRRA Chief Thinks Port Of Plan They Have to Get Out of Europe FRANKFURT, Jan. Gen Sir Frederick E. Morgan, chief of UNRRA operations in gestions. He replied: "This is the only speech of this type that lie has delivered, and I should say no. There is no set procedure on any speech." to the inquiry. Actually. Keefe complained, the state department "is deter- mining in advance whether ma- terial requested by a member of this committee is material, and I am foreclosed from seeing it and judging its materiality by the conclusions drawn by Mr. Acheson." The committee heard from Stark that he was not concerned in late about the ability and wisdom of Adm. Husband K. Kimmel. fleet commander, and others at Pearl Harbor to pre- pare against a possible air attack. Stark Confident of Kimmel Since the situation had been surveyed and "machinery put in motion" at least by the summer of 1941. Stark said. "I felt it no longer necessary to emphasize air attacks in my letters I was sure- that the commander in chief of the Pacific fleet would continue efforts to meet an air attack." Stark recalled that on Oct. 14, 1841 Kimmel wrote that it was possible a Japanese attack on ans' grounds south of Wilburton. in a house constructed by them on ground they cleared in that scentic area. Two years ago they moved back to Ada, however, cause of his health. He is survived by the widow; a daughter, Mrs. Bert Dorsey. Ada; two sons. Earl 'Friday' Warr, Oklahoma City, and Alto'n Warr. discharged from the Army Air Forces in November ami now in San Francisco: three grand- sons Pvt. Paul Hill Warr. in San Francisco on his way overseas, Karl Warr. Jr., and Pvt. Leonard Dorsey. stationed at Fort Sill; brothers and other relatives liv- ing in West Tennessee. in accordance with "a well or- j 'tiiE.e'over positive plan to get out bllity attack woiYhi I of Europe. M o r g a n told newsmen he t vtini HI r, 111: STlfl 012.25 for n closing flourish in i an unknown, secret J< w- i 'not I K -11 f 111 i L 11, f; i i..i.. i i... ISM fire n ri i 7 ;i 1 i f in n --ic tlm have diminished during In- said. "Certainly my concern had that division, the- final total ing Tbc- county total quota was SIMfUHW. the final grand total bond buying nr about percent of the .sum asked. STRATFORD, Jan.. 3. '.Pi- James Patton, national president of the farmers' union, will speak here January 111. Greater returns for amount in-' News Classified Ads. ish organization was behind the infiltration He said he was not convinced about what he des- cribed as "all the talk about pog- roms within Poland." "1 believe we are about to see a second exodus of time from Europe." the UNRRA executive declared. (London officials of the Jew- ish agency for Palestine said they had no knowledge of any organ- ized plan to get Jews out of Eu- rope or to move them from Pol- Staik also supplied figures that afler the attack there wete undamaged ves- sels in the Pacific fleet. Of M in Pearl Harbor. 14 wire sunk or variously damaged by the .sur- prise Japanese attack, the fig- ures showed. All eight battle- ships in the harbor were sunk or put out of action. Dogs in Arizona lulled more than sheep in the Salt River valley during a six-month period. Thieves Break Into Three 0. Stores j OKLAHOMA CITY, Jan., 3, I.PI escaped with more than in cash from three stores at Nowatn last night after battering safes with sledge ham- mers taken from the Kaly rail- road .seelion house, the state bur- eau of investigation reported to- Shei iff Arthur Turner, inform- ing the state office of the inci- dent, said the safes were reduc- ed tn junk by the burglars. Turn- er asked Ivan Kennedy, head of the- state bureau, to supply fing- erprint equipment. Of Course, This Weather'll Change Weather is rightly a topic for remarks any time, e-ven when it is nice-. And when the exceptionally nice weather comes at a time when the conditions are Usually otherwise it is more so than ever. Take the first two days of this year. January is not regarded usually as a month of balmy temperatures and springlike sun- shine. And this one could turn on this area any day now with a flurry of real winter. But a few more days like the first part of this week and peo- ple will begin to wonder if their fruit trees will misunderstand and think it is time to start swelling ,iuds toward blooming. The weather records indicate Mr. Truman's championship of j T'V' this and other legislation tonight llnR 54 de- may well figure prominent ,th" next day 62 next summer's congress.ona. However, any time Read the Ada News Want Adj. It was Mr. Truman's first re- sort to the "fireside chat" tech- nique of his predecessor to at- tempt tn focus public attention on key labor and other legislat- ive prcposals stalled on capitol hill. One of his most recent pro- posals was a recommendation to place the force of law behind fact-finding hoards to permit them to weigh disputes affecting important nation wide indus- tries. Both strikes and lockouts would be barred while the fact- finding procedures were in opera- tion campaiRns. Some of his associ- ates express the view that the .'id-minute speech will lay the (Continued on page 2, col. 4) Bank Deposits In Ada Rise Sharply Gain Over Three Million During 1944, Report As Of Dec. 30 Shows 1! JWEATHER fair and continued mild today, tonight and Friday except eonsidcrahle cloudiness extreme east; low to- i night 32-40 except near 30 cx- i treme west. Bank deposits really mounted here dui ing despite the sev- eral million dollars that went into War Loans and the final Victory Loan. Reports from the two Ada banks las of the close of business on December 30 show total de- posits of SI 4.455.550. That figure is up over the deposits of December 30. when the total was And that figure had show- ed a healthy gain over the December 30. total of In the of loans and dis- counts, the two banks here show- ed a total, as of December I 1945, of PESSIMIST Bab Jr. Th' observer may wonder whut college students do with the'r week-ends an' we've concluded that a lot o' 'em wear the'r hats on 'cm. When Crow N a y 1 o r. a bachelor, wuz asked, whut steps he'd take if he saw a blonde approachin' he re- plied. "Long ones."   

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