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Ada Evening News: Friday, October 23, 1936 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - October 23, 1936, Ada, Oklahoma                                 It would be interesting to bear the late Theodore Roosevelt, advocate of the strenuous life, express his opinion of the hunters who use automobiles instead of horses on their fox chases.          —   ...  *    and    unsettled,    probably    rain    in es-  I 'me west portion tnnicM and Saturday; slightly earner Saturday and in narth and west portions tonight.  THE ADA EVENING NEWS  ADA, the Marketing Center For Southeastern Oklahoma  VOLUME XXX1I1 NUMBER 192  ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1936  THREE CENTS THE COPY  PRODUCTION TEST NEXT FOR WILDCAT  Landon Appeals To Oklahoma Demos To Vote Republican  Final Week of Campaign ^ ill Be Strenuous For President  Declares Principles of Government in Danger lf Roosevelt Wins  INTRODUCED BT MURRAY  Praises Democrats Who Have Deserted Nominee Because Of Policies  OKLAOMA CITY. Oct. 2:5 - CT) —Governor Alf M. Landon summoned ‘'real Democrats’' to join Republicans in ousting the new deal today in addressing an Oklahoma audience to which he was Introduced by a former Demo  Last Day For Registration  FACE THREE FRONTS  Have you registered? lf not.  then J. E. Roswell’s warning that!    ____  today is the last day before the Insurgents Claim Fresh Suc-  November ‘5 presidential election is not untimely*  Roswell, Pontotoc county registrar. reported Thursday night that new registrations are “about normal” throughout the county, totalling between 5^0 and 600,  cesses in Mountains Near Madrid  (By The Anroriated Pre»*>  Spain's opposing armies braced on three fronts today as diplomats or an average of IO to 15 for the assembled to renew London neu-62 precincts.    !    tralitv debate in the peninsular  Michigan, Normally (or G.O.P., Is Rated Doubtful by Dutcher After Tours of Roosevelt and Landon  T  COLDER FRIDAY! PERFORMS WITH  The 10-day registration period  .......    „    ... closes tonight, he said, hut trans-  crane governor. William H. <Al-| fers frnm ong    (Q    ano(her   may he made up to and includ-  falfa Bill) Murray.  “Men and women of all parties" the Republican presidential nominee told an audience filling the 7,50b capacity Coliseum, “have joined forces to turn out an ad-  to support and uphold the constitution.  “And it is only natural that real Democrats should join Republicans in the defense of state's rights—of home rule—against greater centralization of power in Washington.  ing the day of the election.  A complete list of precinct registrars and voting places of Pontotoc county was published in The  civil war.  Insurgent troops of Gen Emilio Mola routed government defender-; from mountain positions at Lass Navas Del Marques, 15 miles west of strategic El Escorial, delayed reports disclosed.  The advancing forces occupied  , , ,     ite     JSAd. News on Sunday. October 11. t he town of Navag  yesterday after  ministration that violates its oath    ___   .    ,____,  ^    routing    socialists    from    the    jagged  [  E  T  pa*sses with a concentrated fire of artillery, machine guns and rifles, j The complicated situation in [the British capital, where replies from tSiree fascist nationals were to be aired in opposition to Russian charges, held only slight hope for amicable settlement of diplomatic difficulties.  Answers Awaited Italy and Germany, accused  with Portugal of aiding Spanish insurgent-;, had their replies ready to the soviet allegations. The answer from the Lisbon government was en route to London by gov-  (11 a. rn., E. S. T i informed sources predicted;  The fascist powers will pro  WASHINGTON. Oct. 23.— Rack at the White House after two days of the most arduous motor campaign in southern New England, President Roosevelt today began making plans today for his final pre-election addresses.  He has one scheduled in Madison Square Garden the night of October 31. White House officials also said the president probably would sp^ak briefly from his Hyde Park, N. Y.» home on election eve. November 2, over a national radio hook-up.  The Madison Square address has been set down as a major speech. In addition, he plans at least one more somewhere in the east. While the president has not named the date and place of this appearance, there wa stalk that appearance, there was talk that Sylvania. probably Scranton, either en route to New York for the Statue of Liberty celebration next Wednesday or between that day and his Garden engagement.  Busy Time Ahead Mr. Roosevelt has two engagements before he goes to New York to participate in the Franeo-Anterican Statue of Liberty ceremonies in the harbor next Wednesday. Tonight he addresses from the White House IS dinners being held in various cities. They are known as the “business men s dinners for Roosevelt.”  Monday he will dedicate a new chemistry building at Howard university here.  Good weather max induce him  By RODNEY DITCHER (Ada News Washington Correspondent I  DETROIT. — Michigan, where thp Black Legion has flourished and where most of the automobiles are produced seemed slightly hatter than an even republican bet before Landon and Roosevelt came campaigning into the state.  Memory of tremendous crowds which greeted Roosevelt in Detroit and other cities has colored all subsequent guesswork. A reorientation of political judgment has led to many private predictions of a Roosevelt victory and has persuaded nearly everyone that Michigan is just another of those large and very doubtful states which Landon must carry to he elected.  Despite a record of political independence and a singular freedom from boss rule. Michigan has gone for a democratic presidential candidate but twice since Lincoln's time.  Roosevelt took her I ti electoral votes by a plurality of 132,000 in 10552. but there has been a backswing —especially iii rtiral areas and small towns—and in the democratic landslide year of 1034 republicans elected Gov. Frank D. Fitzgerald by 84.000.  Tankage Bein? Erected to Give Coal County’s First Producer Test  STATLER WELL ON PUMP  so much more about Fitzgerald  early  Thursday, then went on than Landon that Chairman John  d0WIl to nT  degree* by 2 o'clock   _ !     Thermometer Gets Down I o  If london loses the state by a 35 Degrees in Sharp  small margin, he can blame a    Weather Reversal  state organization which sacrificed him to its candidate for gov- p r i diy wonf  almost rainless ernor, a bandwagon pathology |  but res n',t er ed    in the earlv hour-  arising from the unprecedented  of morninK a    lowe r temperature  ovations given Roosevelt, or Lan-1  thjm did  Thursday, when a chii-don's own course on his Michigan  1|ne fain fp|l mo<r of th ,.  day .   vJ sit.    The    thermometer    got    down    to  Republican billboards are pins- ...  dozreps on    the  record day of I    Comnletion    Potential Report  tered over the state, hut they say ( ^  rold wave .     u ha(i  reached 4b    <~ om P ,etlon     ™    “  Shows Gain of Area  Operations  Oil that shot to the top of th#  derrick before ti could be closed off in the Delaney et al No. I Sawyer, >W SE NW of 7-1-H. was the final convincing that reality is replacing Coal county's old dream of becoming an oil producing area.  Earlier in the week oil rose 2.5Oil feet in the hole from the first Bromide sand but lacked gas to force it to the top.  Tho well was drilled through a six foot shale hr*’ak into what is believed to be t he second Bromide sand.  The result wa* sensational. Opened up late Thursday, the oil rushed from the well, jets shooting higher and higher until it reached the top of the derrick before the valve could cut it off. Friday morning a brief test  Hamilton is said to have pro tested.  Ford Doesn't Help Lau*.**  Roughly speaking. Landon seemed to come to Detroit a; the candidate of the automobile manufacturers and Roosevelt came as the candidate of the automobile workers. There just happen to be a lot more workers than manufacturers.  The president, according to political experts on pro-Landon newspapers in Detroit, scored heavily by patting the former on the hack and mildly panning the latter.  Top men in the automobile industry greeted the governor. Rut the worst thing that happened to him, one is informed, was his endorsement by Henry Ford.  Ford s labor policies are unpop-  (Continued on Rage 2, No. 2;  in the afternoon as the wind continued to blow rain and cold out of the north.  The weather Ada Is receiving is part of similar wintry conditions existing over the southwest arni is not surprising, although it did come on the heels of a warm spell.  I ST. LOUIS, Oct. 23. —    —  “The party of Jefferson has a1-1 Leonard Bajork. regional director ways been the jealous guardian of J of the national labor relations states rights."    (hoard, reported today to the sen-  Landon was cheered and ap-j ate sub-committee investigating plauded when he stepped upon I labor espionage and strike break-the flag-decked platform fronting, he had been denied permis-whlch Murray had introduced him. j aion to inspect the Phillips Petro-“Alfalfa nill” was a candidate ileum company plant at East St. for the Democratic presidential J Louis, 111., where union workersj ernment seaplane, nomination against President Roo- are on strike.    Two things may happen during  sevelt in 1932.    j Bajork said he and David th* session around the council  “He is not a genius who know*    Shaw,    attorney for the labor t a foi e>     scheduled to    start at 4 p. rn.  everything about one thing    and    board,    had sought to inquire into  is foolish on any other subject .“assertions of pickets that atrike-Murrav said, “hut he is a man of j breakers, ammunition and arms.  talent.    jiucluditig machine gun, had been j  ba £ ly deny lh P Russian accusa-  *‘He combines his qualities    with    taken    into the plant. He sai<lI (forts    and counter    with fresh    as-  a pleasing personality that    gets    ^    Joplin?, director of public i aertlor»» Moscow is assisting    Ma-  what he wants done without op~ j  r<dat * ons  * or  *be company, had de-  dr | d  j n  the latter s fight against position”    UMMided a warrant or subpoena be- rebellion    dustrtal towns in the Connecticut  Hyde Speaks    , forP he would  Permit their in-  RuB9 i a , believing efforts to en-  and  Naugatuck valleys. The prest-  V few minutes before Murray j * on - ....    ...    force uon-intervent ion have col-  spoke, the same audience which \,    ,  e r< *S» ona J director said ^(lapsed, will possibly withdraw  to embark tomorrow on a weekend cruise down the Potomac to relax after the tumultuous New England scenes and prepare for his final drives.  On the New England swing, from which he arrived back in the capital early today, Mr. Roosevelt motored nearly 300 miles and greeted shouting crowds in Rhode island, Massachusetts and Connecticut.  Arriving two hours behind schedule in Stamford, Conn., last night, after touring a dozen in  dent reboarded his special train and front the rear platform ex-  Senator Couzens, Wealthy Michigan Senator, Passes  Ford s Fo rmcr Partner Passes Away at Detroit After Operation  CONVICTS SIT IN - ESCAPE ITTEMPT  LANSING. Kan.. Oct. 23.—LD Guards at Kansas state penitentiary shot and seriously wounded one of two convict* who attempted to climb a wire fence and escape early today. The second convict was driven back.  rite prisoner shot was lh D. I through three-inch pipe revealed Weatherly, 35, sen in- a I" to I th at there is plenty of pressure  applauded him liad cheered an' 1,1,11    hp '“"     tol< *     a    lraln    oi    two     from    the    27-naiion    accord    with    a    presR^rl    thanks    for    a    "very    warm  anti-new deal speech bv Harbert ertllman coaches and two boxcars K. Hyde. Republican 'senatorial I    ?  nominee.  Yesterday afternoon. When the  threat of openly aiding the Span-  rer *UOion. ish socialists.    I    Th#u,    as    he    had    done    in    other  Madrid Prepares For Defense town;, he smiled and added;  I.andon’s voice sounded a bit}  tr *^ ers att *mpted to search thcj j a  Madrid, preparations were:    "I ani confident that the people  hoarse from the sore throat which! rars *  hr 83     *     Wf>r0  '^[. rushed to defend the capital  ar * using intelligence in this elec-  bv a man armed wil t a inafhlneLgj^  a  projected fascist invas- Hon year, and I am not the least  mask . j„  t he face of movement of bit afraid of the result.”  gun and carrying a gas slung over his shoulders.  Strike leaders were subsequently permitted to inspect the boxcars and Bajork caid they report  ed finding gas bombs and gas  bas bothered him for two days and prevented any speaking for 24 hours out-of-doors, he wore a russet scarf as a safeguard.  The Kansas, speaking as a neighbor with oil interests who “pay taxes in Oklahoma.” said that in the Sooner state “and in  many other states, the real Demo-  d ,. clarP(l  was a violation of a con-crats hold the balance o f  power, (tract with the union, was called  “In this year of great indecision j  to forcP the  reemployment of W. it will he their courage, their! j  A hrens. president of the local ,  thp     .. natipr    raid     ••  sense of duty, their willingness to i  al !h „  plant> who said hf * was    ,    ‘    commanders    airier  place loyalty above mere party fl red  bec#use of union activities     ln9,,r * e    8    apI *  regularity that will determine j The company denied tho charge.  •whether their states share in the ;     _    *    —  honor of saving American institu-j tions.  heavy artillery into positions within 20 miles of the city.  Anti-aircraft gun* on the roof* of capital buildings blasted today without success at two fas-°®rtridges.    ;    airplanes    which    droned over-  Th** strike .which the company  hPad  dropping leaflet* demanding  surrender under threat of bombardment. Terrified housewives raced through the streets during  The crush of people at the Stamford station was such that several children were knocked down.  DETROIT, Oct. 22 — LV> — James Couzens, 64. Lnited States senator who as an office clerk joined Henry Ford at the turn of the century in founding the motor car company that grew to gigantic proportions, died in a hospital here after an operation late today.  A week ago the senator left the hospital to greet President Roosevelt whose re-election he had termed “the most important matter confronting the nation.” Fol-  Will Be Questioned About Weyerhaeuser Kidnaping Case  AY ^ S HINGTO>L Ort. 23. ZP) J. Edgar Hoover, director of the federal bureau of investigation, announced today the arrest by his agents of Edward Flies, described by Hoover as a former associate of William Dainard, kidnaper of 9-year old George Weyerhaeuser.  Fliss wras captured by federal agents in San Francisco late last night. Hoover said, after a prolonged search.  Hoover said Elis-, wanted for questioning in connection with the location of part of Ute Weyerhaeuser ransom money no* vet  50 year term for hank robbery from Kingman county.  Deputy Warden E. M. Stubblefield said Weatherly was not expected to live. He said Weatherly and another convict were in a group of 2 4 men working ar the prison power plant, enclosed by the 14-foot fence.  About 2; 30 a. rn. Stubblefield I said, the two ran to the fence and started to climb. Guards in three posts on the penitentiary wall opened fire. Weatherly fell to the outside wounded. The other man ran back into the power plant. Weatherly rose, Stubblefield said, but was shot by a rifle bullet which pierced his left lung.  Stubblefield said Weatherly told him three prisoners decided last night to attempt to escape. He said he did not know tile names of the other two but that he had two men in solitary confinement while he investigated.  Weatherly was received at the prison February it). 192*. He was  to flow the oil and now tanks are being erected so that by .Sunday  lowing this statement Couzans recovered, admitted to G-men was defeated for republican re-itj^at he had accompanied Dainard nomination.    j alias William Mahan, through the  Mr. Roose\elt on a campaign,    while Dainard was a fusri-  tour offered to visit Couzens at, jj v#>     also admitted. Hoover  asserted, assisting Dainard in »*x-chansing portions of the Weyerhaeuser ransom money for “good' money. An associate of Fliss". taken into custody yesterday also.  equipment may be in place for taking a re ti production tpst.  Most observers estimate that the well will make a potential In line with other wells of the general area#  Associated with W. A. Delaney jr. is the Choctaw Oil company, headed by George Thompson and Claude V. Thompson.  Continental oil company holds the leases to the west and south of tie Sawyer well, which is in the southwest corner of the Deja ney-Choct aw' lease.  The second sand is said to have every characteristic of the second Bromide sand in the Fitts field except that the grains are angular instead of round.  POTENTIAL'* RISING,  WELLS INCREASING  Steady * \ pan aion of the Ada oil area in i: - several divisions con-  paroled last February but was (i n un  returned June J 4 as a parole violator. He said that after lie was paroled he worked on his father's farm near Centerton. Ark.  AUSTIN. Tex.. Oct. 2 3 - </PV— ' Gov. .lames V. Mired today proclaimed Nov. 4 as Will Rogers Day, in memory of the fifty-se\enth anniversary of the late humorist's birth. Allred suggested  OKLAHOMA CITY. Oct. 23 - -CT* Gov. Alf M. Landon told Oklahomans today that the new deal bas “deserted" Democratic party .    ,    ,  principle* ami violated it* ..a.hl ,ha '  srho0 !'  and n ' ,c r U ” in support and uphold lh* coml-, Prof*™*  ln , “" nor - v of l!n£ ' ,r '-  tution.    |  “Real Democrats. I know.” the Republican presidential nominee said, “will fight shoulder to shoulder with tis in this battle to save: I our American form of govern- J men! and otir country ”    *    *>  The Kansa® spoke in the Coliseum after an introduction by William H » Mfalfa Bill I Murray. former Democratic governor of Oklahoma.  Pausing here nearly four hours on his final trans-continental campaign trip. Landon said Murray, I by introducing the Republican ’  and urged all Texans to observe the day.  WEATHER  THURSDAY  Maximum 66 Minimum.,  Rainfall .5*  Friday 2:30 temperature degrees.  ently intended to move the batteries ahead to positions from where shells could be sent blasting into Madrid's outskirts, accompanied by aerial onslaughts on capital su burbs.  In Paris, French officials spurred by Argentina Foreign Minister Carlos Saavedra Lamas hurried to complete preparations to evacuate refugees from Spanish war zones.  Spanish socialists were 'expected to reply today to queries as to whether they would allow government officials to he taken from the country in the face of fasci-t occupation of Madrid.  5 I  candidate, was “severing political] friendships ’ and opening himself  “to political penalties "  “Only a threat to our form of government itself could cause a man like Governor Murray to take  Oklahoma — Cloudy and unsettled. probably rain in extreme xxe-*t portion tonight and Saturday; slightly warmer Sat-  urday and in north and xx est  l*ortiotis tonight.  Arkansas — Cloudy and unset-  ...    ...    j    j    .tied    tonight    and    Saturday;    sticht-  this step, Landon said. naming  K  .L-    .,f__    i    t*    i.    warmer    in    nor    Ii    and    central  portions Saturday.  John W. Davis. Alfred E. Smith. Bainbridge Colby, Joseph B. Ely. lames A. Reed and Lewis W. Douglas as other Democrats “who are putting their country above party name.”  “Countless other Democrats feel as strongly as they do." he continued. “They max have made no  East Texas — Unset!led, probably rain in north and west-central portions tonight and Saturday; not quite so cold in northwest portion tonight; slightly warmer Saturday. Moderate north and northeast winds on the coast.  West Texas — Unsettled, proopen break, but. they will state habiy rain in north portion tother position emphatically at iho! nich , * mJ  Saturday; warmer Sat-ballnt hove* next month. Their urday and in north and west por-feelings are strong enough to tions tonight  make them rise above the party name even though it means breaking political habits of a life-time.  “When they go to the polls they will not alone be protesting the attempt made by this administration to change the fundamental principles of our American government. They will be rejecting  iCoa.uaugd pa lase -« * N o. 5)  Kansas — Generally fair in the north, possibly rain in south portion tonight or by Saturday; not so cool in northeast and southcentral portions tonight.  Missouri — Partly cloudy to cloudy, possibly rain In northwest portion tonight or by Saturday; not so cool in northwest tonight  and in northeast Saturday.  SEATTLE. Ort. 23.— UP)— Whip women criminals, too, lf you whip men. Justice Reah Whitehead urged here today in Washington'; state bar controversy oxer a proposal that the legislature legalize the whipping post for certain kinds of felonies.  “A woman's skin is no tenderer thart a man s." said the feminine justice of the peace. “But as the proposed measure stands now, women criminals would be exempt.  “I am against the whipping post, but if we must then there should be no master whip wielder but citizens should be drawn for whipping duty as they are drawn for jury duty — and that women should whip women and men should whip the men.”  Homing Ballots  Aberdeen, Wash. — Eight votes from St. Paul’s Island in the Bearing Sea. six from* the Canal Zone and one from Manila. Mrs. Zetta IL Averill, now flying the Pacific on the first regular passenger flight, plans to return her ballot un the Clipper,  OKLAHOMA CITY. Oct. 23.— TH—Gov. E. VY. Marland said today William H. (Alfalfa Bill I Murray's introduction of Gov. Alf M. Landon. republican presidential nominee, at a rally here. would remove Murray “forever from democratic party influence in the state of Oklahoma."  “I am not surprised for he never was a real democrat," Governor Marland said.  “People of Oklahoma are pretty tired of Murray's antics. Democrats ought to be well pleased at his coming out and showing himself a party bolter.  “It removes him forever from | democratic party influence in the state of Oklahoma.  “He won’t do Landon any good nor Roosevelt any harm.  “He is like Al Smith, when the party won t play his way, he takes his hall and glove and he goes home to join some other gang.”  Murray, former democratic gox*. ernor of Oklahoma, boarded london* special at El Reno, Okla., this morning to confer with the Kansan.  As head of the Association for Economy and Tax Equality Murray consistently has criticized new-deal policies.  had been question but would be released, Hooxer said.  Mahan, serving life at Alcatraz penitentiary for the Weyerhaetis-  the hospital but Couzen* left his bed, joined the executive at dinner aboard the special train and stood with him at two platform appearances.  Successor to Be % plaintext  The vacancy in the senate will be filled by appointment by governor, the appointee to serve until in January.  Couzens' early association In Ford's motor enterprise which prospered under what an associate described as “Couzens -  hardheaded financial management” laid the basis for his personal fortune. He was one of the wealthiest senators.    serve    from    ll    1-2    to    25    years at  He disagreed with Ford over     the    Idaho 8ta,e  *> rison for ki,i ~  policies in 1915 and resigned lat-     na b* ni; an 'i robbery.    Record;    did  er selling his interest in the com-     nnf     *bow bx what    method    :se  pa ny to Henry and Edsel Ford    his release,  for nearly $30,000,000-    Other    offenses    charged    against  IT mist CIT!  \ summary of th*' field as of October 2 * shows the following: Fitf;-Huntoi», 92 wells completed. potential awaits classification as Cia ss C pool.  Fitts-Upper Sim po sn. 360 wells completed, potential 847,797 barrels.  Fitts-Wilcox. 2 f wells completed, potential 100,664 barrels.  Jes-e, ll wells completed, potential 33,296,36 barrels.  We.I; due for completion in  Aided Unfortunate Children  Couzens’ charitable benefactions. principally for unfortunate children, were estimated to total more than $20,000,000 including a $10,000,000 trust fund established in 1929 with a stipulation it must he spent within 23 years for the health and happiness of children in Michigan and elsewhere.  Outspoken in his opinions and independent in his political actions, Couzens alienated many republican leaders.  He supported many legislative proposals of the democratic Roosevelt administration but declined to campaign for reelection! t  OKLAHOMA CITY. Ort.. 23 -Pi—Continued snow was reported j the next low weeks xviii send the er kidnaping, recently was trans-1 at Boise City in the Oklahoma total for th'*  f hre*> pools of the furred to the federal hosptial for panhandle today, while Lf3 in- Fins field over the 5«>»> mark. case; at Springfield, Mo.    ■ cites of rain was measured at Du- j figure; given do not Include  Has la»ng < liminal llerord rant in tile southeastern area. , well; or t q several Gilerease Justice department file* dis- The temperature was slowly well; that produce some oil with closed that Fliss alias ’Red" rising from a minimum of 24 in •;g as>  l*ane, was sentenced in 192 » to] Guymon in the panhandle. Hook !  er reported    a light snow    during!    Attention of oil men in    this  the night.    I ae    snow cut    off th»* ;    ar*.».    already    divided among    sev-  row crop Reason, but    farmers were L, ral     developments,    is    shared    by  hopeful for a heavy    snow which |    Continental'; No.    I    Daniels,    in  would provide    moisture    for a     aw    NE sw    of  27-1n-9e,    Coal  wheat crop.    •    county, no xx drilling as a wildcat  It was 42 degrees at Durant. I below- - UI„ fe. t    I  where total rainfall    for the past    , n     northwest Coal    county the  18 hours measured    2.78 inches.  Woodward,    in    northwest    Okla  homa. reported a low of 32.  their prisoner included as. atilt and robbery at Spokane, Wash., investigation in connection with stolen property at Billing;, Moat., for which he receixed 90 (lax; in the county jail and vagrancy in Missoula. Mont.  REV. GFW SMITH ATTACKED BT TRIO  NEW ORLEANS, Ort 23.—-CP) Gerald L. K. Smith wa; attacked by three unidentified men in a  radio studio here last night ju-t  his year on that ticket. He enter-i ,l '    *V ad     deliverec  #1 tho rorxtiKli/x'in rxrimirv Kilt loca U    3    $5*    cli    ll    ll    K    ftO\    Pf    HOI  ed the republican primary but less than a month before the election made his pro-Roosevelt announcement which drew charges of  I an ad-ernor Richard I*eche for “betraying” the late Senator Huey I^ing.  Smith had completed his talk  C trier N<». I Wa me. NE NE NW of    »    wa; drilling Friday at  .3/1-feet, still in Cromwell sand  Another    sad plight    is    that    of    ‘ Ul '*  w r    no  show of oil.  lh* actor    who    made    Rood.    bul     ,h "    * ,u *  , '“ M .  a11  homo"*  fear* thai. if he return* home, b-  fon  inned o furnis 1 ache ope-will be greeted with cheers. He ' * ° ns   is from the Bronx.    I Carter No Richard;. SE SW  __ ___ *_____ SE of ""-2- i; ric-ing up hydril  A friend of ours is so worked 1  and will probably drill into the up over the election that, if his Wilcox sand Sunday or Monday. man lose;, he intends to go hunt-, Magnolia No '• Sutler. SE SE ing and climb over a wire fence SW of 28-2-1, Oil Creek discovery with a gun.    well, xx i?    running tubing and    pre-  ' paring to    zo on pump. In the    last  ;webbing    fe; f  'he well made    374  (barrels of oil in 17 hours, i    Magnolia No. 8 Burr.s-B. NE  TH’  PESSIMIST  j  Train Fired On  SHREVEPORT, La., Oct. 23 — '.P>—Several bullets were fired into the southbound Louisiana and Arkansas passengertrain as it was leaving Alexandria about midnight last night. Nobody was injured. railx**y general headquarters here announced today.  Most of the bullets went through the locomotive and t h e club car. Al least one was picked up in the train.  The firing occurred after the train had left the Alexandria station.  Trainmen of the railroad have  been on strike for several weeks  Greatest returns for amount In vested.—Ada News classified Ady, Wilbur Bracker,  traitor” from republican leaders  and wa - s  ^ atpd ln fhp     <‘"*1  _    I    m    *    *    jro    rife    V    *    ft    ,    A    %    *    ■*    few*    Uh    atm.    A    A    I  By BU Blank*. Jr.  and sealed Couzens’ defeat.  DETROIT, Oct. 22 (UPi—Sen. Jameo Couzens. 64. who left his sickbed a week ago tonight to din** with President Roosevelt, died today after an emergency operation performed in a last desperate effort to save his life.  On the operating table for an bour, the senior Michigan senator never regained consciousness and died while members of hts family stood at his side.  A former partner of Henry Ford, his vast fortune came from the success of the billionaire motor car manufacturer’s dream. Couzens* died after his bld for nomination to a third term in the United States senate had been discarded by the Michigan electorate in favor of a younger man,  closed studio when the three) men walked in. Without any preliminaries. one of them swung on Smith, striking him on the chest.  •Smith’s companions jumped to his defense arrd a brief free-for-all ensued. The intruders, seeing they were getting the worst of] it, made for the door and escaped.  No serious injuries were report-! ed after the scuffle.  Smith, in his speech, criticised Governor Leche particularly for the executives support of a •‘luxury” sales tax and endorsement of President Roosevelt for reelection.  -in on** hour produced 172 barrels , of oil through tubing, with 2,-467,DOO cubic feet of gas.  SKELLY HINTON PETITION DELAYED  The corporation commission,  by request of the shelly Oil com-| pa ny, his con tin tied hearing on petition to reclassify the Hunton j pool of the Fit ta field from Class * D to Class C.  The date for hearing was mov-] ed to November 25.  A Beet in* Team  MUSKOGEE. Oct. 23.—LP>— Carl Bryant, 21. was under life sentence today after his plea of guilty before District Judge o. H. I*. Brewer to a char-*- of slaying his father-in-law, Richard Johnson, 47, Oct. is,  Candidate Ike Jimpaon wuz booked fer a speech at Elm Grove schoolhouse yesterday, but on ’is way t’ th* platform  he kissed the wrong baby. ^   OO—  Anyway^ th' people who hay * their nose t’ th’ grindstone ain't alias got it in somebody else s business.  ! Windsor. Colo.—Windsor high school forfeited its Saturday foot-; ball game with Fort Collins b«-  cause of a temporary closing for j *he beet harvest, but Windsor's record in three games to date left little dotibt of the outcome anyhow. Th*- record:    Windsor 9,  opponents 229 a    

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