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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 19, 1936 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 19, 1936, Ada, Oklahoma                             An .hi, vXSX, Partly cloudy tonight; Thursday unsettled, not quite so warm in north and central portions. THE ADA EVENING ___. .-.-._.. V 1Q 1 Q3fi BUY IN ADA! It'i Cheaper and Better! VOLUME XXXIII NUMBER 136 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1936 THREE CENTS THE COPY) City Votes Incinerator to Issue Bondi to Fi- nance Project By 30 VOTEJSJWE Final Count Shows 151 Ballots For, 121 Asjainst Pro- position Sells For More Than Wheat in Flurry in Chicago Market; Wheat and Oats High CHICAGO. Aug. Corn, more expensive than wheat on the board of trade for the first time in five years, sold today at the highest price in IS years as all major grain values soared anew to fresh 1936 peaks. American tanners, many ot whom have encountered a disap- pointing if not disastrous crop year, watched skyrocketing prices nf their commodities as a result nf tbe drouth whiln government experts forecast farm. Income gains and increased luod prices to consumers. Corn for immediate delivery sold at a bushel, highest price since 1920. Corn for September delivery was quoted as high as a bushel, an overnight jumy'p- -ms, and the highest prlce'In'the (-lection on issuance of bonds to finance a city incin- erator brought out a light vole in which tlie proposal carried by a margin of 151 to 121 ballots. The issue is for or 55 cent of the total cost of 000 for thf incinerator. The in- cinerator, planned as a complete- ly modern, efficient, addition lo th? city's sanitary facilities, bus bad tbe support ot' city officials and civic clubs of tbe city. The official totals on the vote were as follows: J-'or the proposition, ISl. Avainit the proposition, 121. Total votes cast, 273. Number of mutilated 1. The smallest vote in any pre- cinct was in ward 2 precinct 1 where only eight ballots were cunt. The largest vote was In ward 4 precinct 4 where four votes were in fnvor ot the proposition and 2K against. Klght precincts car- ried the proposition, five voted It down and In two precincts the vole was a tie. aijo and 43 cents higher than a ne annouucail. The pre.-ent ruling on the num- ber of votes necessary to carry a bond Issue is a majority, tin- der Ihe old three-fifths ruling the present Issue would have failed. Now that the bonds are voted the next step will be the calling for bids. The project has already been approved by the federal gov- ernment which Is furnishing 45 per cent of the cost. The Incinerator will meet a lone felt need for a more sani- tary disposal of garbage within 1 he city. A system of collection will be'set up by tbe cily admin-, istratlon and the garbage able in Chicago at the ed to ashes at the plant. I timfi were estimated at Voting bv precincts in TIIRR- ISO.000 bushels whils unsatisfied August had ad- futures market since 1fl27. September corn vanced more than 11 cents so far this ami is now more, than I'.O cents higher than a mouth ago and 43 cents higher than a year ago. Wlienl: nu Oals nt oats, nnd rye also sold at new 193B peaks. September wheat V.-KS Quoted up to a bushel, highest in t'uO last two years. September oals told above 45 cents and rye above Sfi cents. Kxplanatlon of tire scramble for corn, traders said, was believed to be based on ex- tremely pessimistic crop prospects along with a very scanty visible supply in the large terminals. Contract stocks of corn avail-1 Astor Case Romeo Ends His Hiding Out ot the seclusion Into which the Astor case drove him, George S. Kaufman, playwright roman- tically starred as No. 1 man ot Mary Astor's diary and testimony, buries his nose in a book at his apartment in New York, where be told interviewers he had spent tour days nerving himself for the ordeal of resuming public con- tacts, "f haven't kept a Alleged Conspirators Against Stalin Government. Submit Without Defeiwe DEflTH SENTENCES EXPECTED Charged by Soviet Authoritiei With Beiny in League With Trotsky MOSCOW, Aug. cused Trouky conspirators plead- ed guilty in open court today to Soviet government charges they had plotted to seize power through an organized reign of ter- ror in which Dictator .losef Stalin and other head? of the state would have been killed. Prosecutors, at the opening of the trial, charged tbe plot was di- rectly organized by Leon Trotzky. famous bolshevist exile, and that the plotters hoped for Interna- __ f lional complications which would i pave the way for overthrow of the1 government. The German gest'apo (secret po- lice) also was charged with direct Vaughan Becomes President Of N E V Teachers Statements Indicate Josh Lee Heads List For Amounts Expended in Races particip.V1011 in the plot. Frant Weitz, still at large, was named by prosecutors as the, German agent who acted as a go- between with Berlin and led expenditure ot David, one of it was alleged, at the Comintern congress defeated, In the first PII OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. of the state election hers today showed that democratic senatorial nominee, spent on bis sec- ond primary campaign. Lea reported spending in bis first primary campaign. Gov. E. W: Marland, opponent of Lee in the second primary, lis- coru par- 1L11 JJVI lilt i of the prisoners, with for the first, and red, was to have killed 1 T. P. Gore, incumbent who was Stalin last July. David admitted attending the Mother Tails to Win Custody She Relinquished 1 I Years HOLLYWOOD, Cal., grandmother day's bond 1 o w s: Wnnl I P reel lie I. 1 Precinct 2 rreel net Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Wnnl li Precinct Precinct Precinct Wnnl a Precinct Precinct Precinct Wnnl -I Precinct Precinct Precinct Trecinct election was as fol-j contracts .on tiie board of trade providing for delivery of corn .in Vor ___________.17 ______S _______IS ___________12 ,__________15 __________x September total more than 000 bushels. 1-1 A car ot Xn. 2 white corn sold 1 on the Chicago "spot" market at S1.R7 a bushel. The previous hii'h price for cash corn was estab- lished m 1920 was as high as per bushel was quoted. AH cash corn prices around 4 cents higher in today's market. estimates place li'.e United States expected com pro- duction at the smallest volume in more than billion bushels below normal. i A sharp increase in margin rc1- i iiuiremeius for trading in corn I was instituted today by trie board 2_i ot trade clearing.association. Thi.'i lo-] action was seen in some quarters as a possible brake on specula- tive activity. BE OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 19 Harden Ray, president of the slate League ot Young Democrats. announced here today the organi- 7.atlou of the "first voters" league, composed of yuiinj; men and wom- en who are participating in a presidential flection this year for the first time. Kay said he has asked county presidents ot the league to nomi- the girl'o mother, Mrs. "Fellows, t') gain the wr.icli she relinquished STJGE FIST FIGHT first voters league units. He said the new group will serve as a subsidiary to the League of Youns Democrats. Hay said a meeting of c o u a t y chairmen of the new organization will be bold (ill days before t h e November t! general election. WEATHER Tuesday jlax. 104 Min. 79 degrees. Wednesday p. m. Tern. 102 degrees. Oklahoma: Partly i-loutly to- night; Thursday unsealed, not Miiite so war'', in north and cen- tral portions. Arkansas: Purity r.loudy nUhi: Thursday unsettled, prob- ably scattered thundershowers in northwest and central and n.o t quite so warm in liorthwest por- tion. East Texas: Partly cloudy, and unsettled, probably on tbe const tonight and Thursday. Moderate oitslerly winds on t It e const. West Texas: Partly cloudy to- night' ami Thursday, probably lo- cal showers In extreme west por- tion: not miitc so warm in the panhandle Thursday. Missouri: Local thundershowers tonight or Thursday; cooler In north portion tonight and Thurs- NEW" YORK. Aug. The bitterness existing among Tammany hall leaders flared into the open today when William P. Kcnncally, chairman of Tam- many's eexcutlve committee, en- gaWd in :i fist with Christo- pher Sullivan, ilisirict leatitr. .Sullivan was named yesterday by James .1. Doolin. Tammany chief, as one of a triumvirate to assist in the administration of the hall's affairs during Doolin's illness. The fight started in the office of Hort Strand, secretary of ll'ti hull, us Keiuieally and Sullivan gathered with other- TamniMiy leaders in response lo enneally's call for an informal conference today. Kennoally suddenly si ruck at Sullivan and the two men, both past middle age. exchanged blows before leaders parted them. The cause of'the trouble, was not disclosed. Kenneally yesterday expressed opposition lo tbe numiu'41 ot -he ti-iumviraie of Sullivan, Charles K. Hus.-iisy ami SH-phen A. '.'.tudily, iintl at first threatened to ci'.ll :i Hireling of die executive conYm'it- tee. Lai or, however. In- culled the informal meeting for today. Aug. ho idith'Fellows from oahyhood re- tained guardianship i-f the yer.r old film aciross by court loday. Edith's bank account and JDftO a week salary...earned as the "problem child" in numer- ous screen drama, were con- signed to the care of a trust com- yan.v. Thus ended the suit brought by Harriet cusiody to Mrs. Kliziibeih .Fellows, paitrual grand mother. 11 years ago. A lawyers' conference brought the week-long hearing to sud- den termination after Kilith, her mother and grai.'dniofher all had testified. Harriet Fellows declared she hid spent years senrching for her daughter ai'.-l when she found her, the child acted as i; her mind were poisoned against her. .Mrs. Elizabeth Fellows told of scrubbing floors and doimr odd .lobs' to earn enoush 10 educate the little girl whom loved_as a daughter." "My grandmother i> the only mother have evc-r known." fiod Kiiilh. "I'm not used to lur- ing strangers." Happy over Superior .luJgc Arthur Cr'im's ruling, ihe grnud- iiiother promised to allow mother opportunity to visit E'riith at all reasonable congress as a delegate but said he was unable to get close enough to shoot Stalin. He was alleged to have come to :he Soviet L'nion with a Honduran passport and a kroner check given him by Trotzky's son. Hel'iise Counsel All the 16 defendants refused counsel and said they would de- fend themselves, But hardly had the session opened when Gregory Zinovieff. former high bolshevik leader accused as one ot the mast- ers ot the conspiracy, .rose and declared: "I am fully His colleagues, including Leon Kameneff, also ft one-time com- munist .leader; ousted -by Stalin, NEW PRESIDENT mary. Law limits campaign expenses for senatorial candidates to 000 for any-single election. The board's report showed that I candidates .for congress near .the mark in the two primaries. K. J'. Hill, fifth district demo- cratic nominee, spent for the second' primary and in tlie July 7 campaign. His defeated opp'onent, F. B. Swank, Norman, iistd ?6fi7 in the second primary fight. Will Rogers, democratic nomi- nee for congressman at largo, spent ?221 in tha second primary and S7-) 4 in the first. Phil Ferguson, Woodward, eighth district democratic incuin- JOH.V VAUGHA.V TEMJ1SI Man Who .Broke From Payne County in 1931 Caught in West'Virginia OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. Cunningham, par- don and parole officer. Indicated today he would ask the. return from Delbarton. W. of Wil- liam M. Sumner, 24, who broke from the' Payne county jail Dec. I 21, after being sentenced to I eight years in McAlester peni- tentiary on1 a robbery charge. Cunningham said Sumner was captured in a gun fight at Still- water following a series.pt rob- beries in which the victims were mistreated and beaten. .r.'''T. Caldvnel'K Sumner's'. corn- followed 'although X Smirnoff.! bent, used in the. first pn- ahd E. Holzaiann, two-q-fStbe-les- -mary and in the second. CRT- riefend-an'ts. pleaded guilty i Wilburn Cartwric'ht, ciemocrat- ser defendants, -pleaded with reservations and said they were not Involved in the actual at- tempt .to kill.the leaders. Death List. Those marked .for dfcuUi, in ad- dition tci .Stalin, included Klemen- ti Voroshiloff, comniissar ot war: man of the. Ail-Union Peasants Congress and comniissar for rail- ways; Gregory K. Orion commissar of heavy industry, and the head ot the communist party day. Kansas: Mostly cloudy, local thundershowers In east portion to- night or Thursday; not change in temperature. much CHURCH AXD BAli.V. BUKXED AT'BHAGGS BRAGGS, -Aug. Firfi last night destroyed the Braggs Church ot Christ, a two story dwelling, am'i a barn near- by. Loss wus t'iUiniuted at Or'min of the fire was unknown and because ot the dry condition, flames spread rapidly from the house and for a time the town's business district was threatened. .Muskogee firemen answered- a call but flames were under con- trol when they arrived. The burned dwelling was oc- cupied b ythe families ot Bill eKn- nedy and Floyd Calvert. Several children were In the when ihe tire started, but none were in- jured. OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. G. Johnston, slate Repub- lican chairman, said here today fliat he would call later-in the week a series of-Republican con- gressional district meetings lo or- ganize the stale campaign. "For these meetings we will carry our organization work into each-precinct of the John- ston said. Johnston said county chairmen, vice-chairmen and stale, commit- teemen in eacli of tiie eight, legis- lative districis will attend t h e district meetings. Ho said tbe candidates favored a volunteer orsifhizalloii reach- ing every precinct, but details -were not yet'completed.1 Johnston said anti-new deal Democrats would-be-asked to join Republicans in electing a state and national ticket. A parly finance committee will be appointed next week to raise funds. _____ sxow K.AI.I.S ON Tor v Oh' I'IKKS I'KAK 'lOIKSOAY COLORADO SPRINGS, Aug. 19. (.'Pi Midwest tourists had something more than a "wish you were here" p'oslco.rds .to back home friends. Heavy wraps and mittens were in order for those who .went to the top of-Pikes-Peak. Four inch- 'es ot snow .fell there lasrnignt as the temperature dropped 'lo 37 degrees above zero. Creates; returns for amount in- vested: Ada News classified ads'. Two More Die As Heat Wave Remains Unbroken; Key Considers Relief Plans panlon, was killed' by officers OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. _ Temperatures throughout Oklahoma vaulted toward the 100- degree mark today as the weekly crop report gave a bleak picture of conditions and two more heat deaths'-was reported. Muskogee reported 1C! degrees at noon. It was in O.klahoma i-itb' Tulsa" re- teraper- ic .incumbent in the third cong- ressional district., reported cam-, ti r paign expenses of .fliSO in Lnc, ot pactu.es i second primary hnd In the at porting a mid-morning attire of 0-1. Fires which swept S.nflO acres near Pauls Valley ad- when he resisted arrest, Cuunlng.- ham -said. Sumner entered a plea of-guilty "Dec. 20. 1031, in StlHwater- and was given an .eight year.sentence. He escaped the following night. Cunningham said that.'Sumner has written M, J. Bradley, super- intendent of the Pauls Valley training school who in. 1931'was Payne county sheriff, 'expressing a desire to clear his record. Ministers, church workers and friends of Sumner at Delbarton, W. Va..- have sent numerous re- quests for clemency to Cunning- ham. "I am going to leave myjtf'se up to God. and you. to Cun- ningham -said-Suiiiner wrote him Henry ,W... Hall, district judge for the'Cogan .and Payne "county protested S'umner'-a 'plea "I-have no-personal interest in this matter other than that I fee" first, while Lyle Boren, Seminole, democratic nominee in the fourth district, spent Ihe second primary. Nomination certificates of number of candidates for the stale legislature being halp up be- cause campaign expense r.cconnts have not been filed. ,1. William Cordell, secretary said. of the board, In Ihe'L'krane, Posiishcff. V.inovieft and Kameneff, who with the 01 hers are expected to re- ceive the death penalty, already nre serving sentences for activity in connection with another alleged plot against the government In 1924'. Three formal charges were made against the defendants as they entered the court room un- der guard. Cnairman j0hn p. M. Hamilton, They were: ,i flew northward today for continu- 1. Organizing a cenlei to seize campaiSn j DALLAS, Aug.' 19. j publican National (.T) Re- Committee power by terror. 2. Organizing terroristic groups to shoot Stalin and other leaders. 3. iKTlllng Sergei M. Kiroff. chief, aid of the dictator, at Lenin- grad on Dec. 1. All the prisoners, apparently destined for the death sentence, were former members of the com- munist party. Th.e indictment stated the de- fendants had admitted they had no definite political program for use when they gained power. Allegedly, the plot was hatched in Kai'neneff's apartment in Mos- cow in and 1934. Trotzky, the government charg- ed sent instructions to S. Mirach- Kovsky, one of the' defendants, through Trotzky's son. OSLO. Norway, Aug. 19. Tbe mate's attorney decided to- day to ignore nazi charges tliat Leon Tro'izky, the -Russian e.xilo. has engaged in illegal activities here. The charges were not bacssti by sufficient evidence, the prose- cutor ruled. returned today to -Hoeii- efos from a small island on th-3 south coast. TuOUEHITOBELIEf By D. HAROLD OLIVER Frtu Wrilcr) HYDE PA11K, N. Y., Aug. .Roosevelt today canvassed latest droul.ii develop- ments ;u a conference witli five financial and relief a. view to mapping new relief steps. Secretary Murgenthau and Dan- iel Reil, acl.ing budget direc- tor, .went In The siininifti' White House for the parley from thft trt-asuip' secretary's nearby Dutch- ess county borne. Harry L. Hopkins, federal' re- lief administrator; W. Frank Per- sons, director of the United State? employment service.' and "Walter Burr, assistant, came by train from ded to 'the suffering ot the R0ru.ewhat--outraged'to think-the new deal. Kan.-an told 000 Texans last night the "Roose- velt administration is skillfully at- tempting to have the American their own death drought stricken areas. Thomas Jefferson J' died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. S. T. Moore. Oklahoma City, heat exhaustion. The Rev. W. R. Edwards, 79. retired Baptist missionary to the Indians of eastern .Oklahoma, died at McAlester yesterday. Cotton plants were reported wilting, prematurely dropping bolls and dying, the crop report. Waler Scnrt-e Stock water was reported scarce over the entire low in many cities.' and1 .cattle growing thin because ot lack of feed, and water. The Harlshorne cily council passed an ordinance last night imposing a fine on any persons washing their automobiles out ot the city water supply. Officials said an 1 S-day supply of water re- mains in the municipal lake, slate ot -Oklahoma would enter- tain an application, of this kinc and under the circumstances, i this-.defendant'is sincere in hie professions of reformation, T. fee' he should come back and stir render himself to proper authori- the judge, said. T.' L. Bocbck. Payne count) sheriff, also protested clemency. said Sumner has Indicated that be will resist iriy attempt to return him here. taxpayers sign wai'rants and dig their graves. Hamilton had a gagement at Sedalia. Mo., today. The plane's'immediatc destination was Kansas City. In the Texas Centennial exnosi- lion court of honor last night Hamilton said the American con- source of tlie town's supply. A new pest added to the trou- bles oj Oklahoma cotton farmers. .Ephriam Hixson, Oklahoma A, and I M. college entomologist, said the stittition was threatened "change by usurpation." with AUSTIN, Tex.. Aug. The right' ot the Texas railroad commission to Inquire into the le- gality o! oil claimed lo have been imported from Louisiana, was up- held by a three-judge federal court in a decision filed here. The court. brought by the Panan-.a Refining com ruled that the commis- sion could stop Texas movement of product's of claimed Louisiana oil unisss it was -shown the nil was produced in conformity with Louisiana regulations. The court decision affirmed the commission's authority to require of owners detailed information as to .the source ot allow- ing them- to check with the Louis- iana authorities on the legality of the oil. The federal court was compos- ed of Circuit Judge Joseph C. Htitcheson of New Orleans, who wrote Ihe opinion, and District Judges Robert ,T. McMillan of SHU spiking en-! annual migration of the cotton leaf worpi into the state is under way. He suggested dusting with Calcium arsenate as a method of control. To combat the suffering brought on by the drought, W. S. Key, state works progress admin- istrator, said today he would call a meeting of ail the district WPA directors'for Saturday to plan projects to aid drought needy. Sixteen Oklahoma school lead- ers left here today to present, the drought problem as it affects the of Oklahoma to the. nati- onal youtii administration confer- ence in Marysville, -Mo, Burton Wright, state director ot the national youth council, said, that state would ask for no spec- ific amount, of money. "We will present the picture and let them decide how much money we -will need this Wright said. test case Aiuonio and Houston. Kellerly of .OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. 10 The. state, highway commis- sion today designated as a' state highway the road leading from Crescent north through Lovel and Marshal! to .Covington in Logan and Garfield counties, gravelled. It will be TAMPICO ESCAPES Hui-riiNin'e K.vprc.ied n> Miss .Mexi- can Coast. City TAMPICO, Hex., Aug. Tam'plco, repiembering her sands of fatalities in the great hurricane of heard with re- lief todny she probably would cape the Cult of Me.dco disturb- ance now .rettortid moving Inland. -Pan-American Airlines received reporls the storm was about S'J kilometers' (approxjpintely fit' miles) north of 'i'ampicn, which meant It was sweeping an almost uninhabited area of: swampj and wasteland, A .central observatory bulletin also stated the disturbance was of "little probably would move'inland just north of. Mils famed oil. shipping port at the mouth of, the.Paauco.river.. ESTES PARK, Colo., Aug. Alt M. Landon.said'to day liis second trip ot ths presl dential campaign would take him Into the middlewestern farm' belt The Republican preside ntla nominee, as he packed for his firs eastern political foray starting to morrow, said it had not. been, de cided what states would be includ ed ;n this central tour no wl'-'.her he would make speeches Neither, he the tlm of this trip been decided. However, the candidate t o 1 i newspapermen, in reply to a ques tion, that Michigan would not b included. Aides explained that su states as Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois Indiana and Jlinnesota-were bein considered' for the-.second tour. Landon and his party complete plans to board a train at La Sal le, Colo., 'tomorrow for a cross country I rip that will take hin east, for three speeches. At West the aft ernoon of Saturday, Aug. 22; a Chautauqua. N.'Y., Monday nighl Aug. 24..and Buffalo. N. Wed nesday night, Aug. 2G. PORT 3PAI Trinidad Aug.  resident of Northeastern' 'State Teachers college at Tablequab: by. he state board. of education. Gov. E. W. Marland appointed A.. L. 'Crable, director of corres- pondence-study -.department a-i'd extension class teal-bin; a.t Okla- loma'A, and M. college, as stata superintendent at the same lima .accepted Yaughan's resigna- tion'. Crable tjok office Immediately. 'will take over' tlie prcsi- lency ot Northeastern succeeding Dr. J. M. Hackler, act- president who will be restored. to .his former position as tha college faculty. Hackler. has been acting as pres- ident since tlie death M. .IV Hammond in February. As state superintendent, Crabla also becomes .a member .the state'school land commission, the state board of equalisation, chair- man of the. board ot regents of tiie Okla'hoina College lor .Wo- men! Chickasha, head 'of th> board ot rejenlx -of juni9.r.. .college, .-Miami, o: the'board'bf'regents of Southeast- ern junior coliege.-Wilburton, and. ihafrriian'. of. the state library; com- mission. ,-Vaugtian. will- receive a salary. o.f a' y ear' a.s president q" tlie'taachers; 'college.'.He re- a year as state SUIH erintendent.'-. 'After'nine years 3i> a menibtr; of- the--faculty ot Teachers, .at Duract, Vaughan. was. erintendent by former Gov. S. -to jerve-Otlt o" M. A. Nash, who resigned, to become president ot the Oklahoma College'- for Women. He siiiM has been elected twice to four-year terms. Native o( Crable-was born in. Hunt coun-' ty, Tex., in 3S80, was; sraduated.' from' high school in Lone'Oak, Texas., "in his'BJA. degree from Austin collegu.1 at Sherman, Te.v., in'lOl.T, and.'a' master's degree from-the-'Univer-' sity of Oklahoma in 1927. Jn' 1914 he" taught In .'rural schools in Texas., and after serv- ing in .the army'during it.he; World war .taught high school in Sadler, Tex., served two years a.s superin-. tendent ot schools in Coilin'sville. Tex., was for two years 'principal of the Marietta, Okla.. high-- and eighteen months -as head ot the .Durant high school- From February, 1924, to Aug. 1929.' .he served as state high, school -inspector In .the state tin- partinent of education and from. that'datu until today, was a mem- ber of the 'Oklahoma. A1, and college faculty. Crable has a wife and children.' 1 Tomorrow, Crable will go' lo1' Marysville, Mo., to attend a rc-j gional meeting -of the national youtii adraini-strstion. He said he had not yet decided whether he would make any changes in the state superintend- ent's office personnel. TH' PESSIMIST Br Btb Jr. Leroy Harp. A. B., B. 3.'.' LL. B..-Ph. D..-has gone t1 work at th' "Y" flllin.' sU- tion. I.wouldn't bother sue couldn't possibly git it down before sometime'tombr-' said Lem Wheeler., when th' nurse started V call-' last night on count .0.' 'is wife swallowin' 'er. tongue,   

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