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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: December 15, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 15, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Warren Kerrigan in a Romance of California in the Days of '49, When Justice Was Meted out in Summary Fashion-liberty Today ft THIS DISTRICT VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 235 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY m A CLOSE SHAVE FOR THE OLD HOOKER BRITISH VKAXS AUK KOU THE MBASUKK OK SELF UOYKKNMKXT OK WHICH j EUYIT IS OAPABhK. KEPOUT OK ONE OIMiASIZATlON SHOWS THAT 551 AMERICANS HAVK I1KHN SIN'OK By ttw AwofiHtwl WASHINGTON. Dec. Britain's plans for establishing a, constitutional form of government i in Egypt are sot forth in an of-; ficial statement made by Earl Cur-' British Minister of Foreign; Affairs, which has boon received here. Objects of the Miluer Mission which goes to Egypt to arrange the proposed now government are des- cribed in the statement. The British Foreign Secretary an-' uouucos that it is the intention of. the British government to establish! the largest measure of self-govern-1 mont for which Egypt is believed capable at this time. He states that.' the Milner Mission is not author- ited to impose a constitution on: Egypt, but rather to study tho situa- tion and confer with the native leaders. In part. E.u'l Ourzon's statement' follows: "It was in 1P14 after we had boon compelled to declare war upon Tur- key that the British protectorate over Egypt was declared. So far as ibis being intended or indeed re- garded at 'ho time as a high-handed act. aimed at the suppression of Egyptian liberties, it was decided upon by Mr. Asquith's government as n much milder and more generous- policy than that of annexation which at that time was stroncly advocated by some. Cyprus, which had long. been administered by the Colonial Office as part of the British empire. was annexed. But the opportunity of incorporating Egypt in the empire was deliberately, and I think, wisely rejected because it was intended, in a wide latitude of opportunity which the fomulae of a protectorate af- fords, to give free scope to the political aspirations am: the self- governing capacities of the Egyptian "I need hardly elaborate the rea- sons for which Gro.v. Britain is compelled to interest herself in the political fortunes of and is unable to give any encouragement to the claim of complete national in- dependence. Quite apart from the fact that Ecypt. if loft to stand alone, could neither protect her fron- tiers against external aggression nor guarantee a strong or impartial gov- ernment at home, her geographical position at the gate of Palestine, at the doorway of Africa and the high road to India, renders it im- possible that the British Empire with any regard to its own security and conditions should wash its hands, of the responsibility for Egypt. "Egyp' is of course, primarily an Egyptian interest, the good covern- ment and the prosperity and happi- ness of its peoplpe are the highest consideration. But it is also a Brit- ish interest of capital Importance and 1 suspect tha; there are few who would deny that it is also a world interest, and that the world Interest is best secure by leaving Egypt under the of a great civilized power. "But within these boundaries is a wide and ample field in which the Egyptians are invited to participate. and must as time passes on, partici- pate in an ever increasing degree in, the government of their country.' We recognize the legitimacy of these! aspirations. Wi- desiri- to provide for their satisfaction. The progress-1 ive development of self-governing iu-. Stltuiions In Egypt is an ideal In which they may share with us and we with them. It is not to bo thought of that a race like the Egyptians, possessing in its upper, ranks a high culture and historic memories, should be content with (i role of passive subordination in the administration of their country. "It will be the object of Lord Milner and his colleagues, in con- sultation with the Sultan and tm ministers and representative Egypt- ians of all classes, to devise tho detail sof a constitution by whim nil these parties shall be able' in their several spheres and in an in-, creasing degree co-operate In the. management of F.Kyptlan affairs. British assistance and British guid- ance will still be required. Nor will' any of those who have followed the history of "Egypt for the last forty years and seen tho astounding ad- vance that she has made under our auspices question the necessity of this supervision. "Lord Mllners mission IB not out to Egypt with a constitution In its pocket. It Intends to consul all parties before It even forms an opinion. It Is not authorized to Im- pose a constitution upon Egypt. What it has to do Is to undertake the preliminary work that Is neces- sary before the future form of gov- ernment determined." Uy tin1 WASHINGTON, Dec. 15. The! National Association for the Pro-: tection of American Rights in Mexi- co has sent out for publication inj newspapers throughout the country: !i map and statement showing that; 551 Americans have been killed Ini Mexico since November 20, 1910. j Of this number, the association, states. 423 were civilians and 123j soldiers or sailors. One hundred sixty-seven Americans were slalnj during the Madero and Huorta gimes, while 383 lost, their lives, since Carrtinza took control of the1 Mexican government, according to, the statement. j In the list accompanying the map a number is assigned to ench Amerl-, can killed and his or her name, date., place and manner of deaih and the! source of information concerning the; individual case are given. The man 1 nor of death ranges from "killed by strav bullet" to wanton murder, and! includes instances of alleged torture] and mutilation. j The association gives as the I sources of its information in pre-i paring this map and statement I three lists of Americans killed hi1 Mexico or along tho border, pro-1 pared by the state casualty lists of the war depart-] mom; a list of Americans killed In1 Mexico prepared by Thomas E. Gib- bon, author of "Mexico Under information submitted the senate by Senator Albert B. Fall' of'-Now Mexico; newspaper articles givinp tho name, date and locations of murders: and information In the possession of the National Associa- tion for the Protection of American Right? in Mexico. In summing up. the association says: "Bandits" were responsible for ISS of the murders listed on the map. according to the authorities cited. Officials, officers, or followers of Oarranza are charged with 76 of the murders, according :o the map. Villa and his band killed SI of the Americans listed. "Inert istas account for 41. Madens tas for 13 and Zapatistas for five, miscellaneous outlaws listed by the authorities cited as "rebels." "revo- "cattle thieves." "smug-i glers.' 'and similar marauders, were: responsible for 70 murders and 23 j (WOIISSIONKR OF 'IMMIGRATION nUKKAU OPP08KD TO AJUKXS OF UNDESIRABLE CHAR- ACTER OVLY WIDESPREAD SOCIAL AND IN- DUSTRIAL UNREST MUST CKASE BEPOKR WE BECOME NORMAL By tho Associated Frew WASHINGTON. Dec. tion of an additional office of As- sistant Secretary of Labor with ju- risdiction over all immigration mat- ters, deportation of alien draft slackers and strengthening of: tho By the Associtiitu i'r.'. LONDON Dec. 15. The world can expect no relief from the pres- ent 'high cost of living and the tbe widespread social and industrial un- rest has disappeared and the war- shortage of commodities until border patrol service against unde- 1 shattered economic machinery sirabl-es, are among the recommen- been put in order, according to dations made by Commissioner Gen-j Charles A. McCurdy, Parliamentary eral Caminetti of the Immigration j Secretary to the Ministry of Food. Bureau in his annual report. Suggestions that immigration be suspended completely were opposed by the commissioner on the ground that it would have an "injurious effect upon our efforts to further American commerce and enterprise! in foreign countries." Continuance j of war-time passport vise regula- tions and assignment of immigration j bureau representatives at consu- I lar offices to aid In excluding un- I desirables was urged instead. Only two aliens were excluded from the United Stales during the 1 fiscal year on anarchistic grounds, while 37 aliens in the same class 1 were expelled from the country and 55 are now awaiting deportation. To reach American citizens who en- gage in similar propaganda, the re- port urges od by the the immigration laws" be criminal offenses. Deportation is "not punishment j for crime" but merely allows pondent of The Associated Press, and added that he was not particu- larly optimistic over the chances of any marked betterment of situ- ation in the near future. "We have Bolshevism at one end of the world and widespread strikes at the said Mr. McCurdy, not until society resumes ita normal course can we right econom- ic conditions. "It is very difficult to prophesy regarding the food situation of the future in view of the fact that the whole economic structure of the world has been so badly dislocated. There is hardly any factor of busi- ness that is stable, and we do not know what wages are to be. A3 ft result of these conditions the regu- lar channels of distribution are dia- organized and until they are normal madeiir wil1 be impossible to tell -what 1 effective supplies there are as com- .IVST A KWIl'ARISON The Daily today was eight puges. the same size as thf Kvening News. The News carries, eight pages and more reading1 matter than the Oklahoman, )due to the fact that the carried nearly three Pages of v bulIeVs SITRKME COVRT SAYS SIO.NINO border. Vaqui 'and OK NOT AB- miss.'ble Japanese and Qhinese, as! a -shortage if the peoples of ,......____, Japanese ana uninese, as i T- S The News entries news (.ITV OFKIOKRS TAKK TWO PHIS- wpll ;ls alicn Demies. Europe be NOT AB- several later than the oNKRS AND THKKB ,ad ,b next year t-0 purchase the meat May Indians killed IS Americans during the period coveroiT by the map, and casual rebels murdered, six. In 25 of the cases listed the authorities were unable to determine ny who did the killing." ROGATK CONGRESS1 TIME POWKRS. Oklahoman apd has also nearly twice the amount of display advertising fcjr merchants. Thus the News beat the Okla- homan in both the duality and OF DKAIH.Y POISON WITH TRIMMINGS li-rt'i I .-ad .been smuggled 'uu II Uupted the proposal to strength- j ad- from. RAILWAY ADMINISTRATION VM> BROTHERHOODS AGKEK 111, UH UIK, Mi-t-i t iuin_c 
                            

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