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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 9, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             Do You Believe in the Regeneration of the Humari Soul? Whether You Do or Not You Should See Mildred Vane, Showing at the Liberty Today II THIS DISTRICT CuElttltg 6RETURNS VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 230 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1919 THREE CENTS THE COPY KXKCVTTVK AXl> SOAl.lv IN KAl-K OF PROBABLE SBTTLK- OOMMITTKK TO INTO MKXT OF ST1UKK, TODAY TO I TUATOK. (iAKFlGLD TIBS SESSION SKTTLK DISIH'TK, DOWN THE LID. By AuoeUtcd Prou Hy "w Ajsonnt.x) Press INDIANAPOLIS, lud., Dec. WASHINGTON. Dec. ihe Sottlement within twenty-four hours' face of an expected settlement of of the strike of 400.000 bituminous' coal miners of the country which tin- coal strike at today's meeting in Indianapolis. Fuel Administrator had its Inception "more than TivejOnrfield put effect today the ago, WHS sufficiently predict-: most drastic irgulutions foi fuel ed today. I i-'-onomy since the restrictions oC At 2 o'clock this afternoon the! 1918. Even if the strike was sot- executive board and scale committee. tKxi today, IIL- lednivd, fuel con- of the' United Mice Workers observation measures would be neces- America wore scheduled to go iutoj sary as sevor.-n week-s would bo session to consider the proposal, required for tho national fuel supply made by President Wilson to John to be iw. >-oil to normal. L. Lewis, acting president, ann', Probably the most important regu- Willinm Green "secretary-treasurer! lation is that proscribed for nianii- of the organization Saturday night.! fucturiug plants using bituminous The proposal was expected by the: coal or coke. These will bo restricted miners' officials who returned to1 to operations three days a week on Indianapolis today. the basis of present working hours. While none of' those present Kxception is made HI -avor of plants the. Washington conference would' manufacturing what 'Jro considered give out any details of the Presi-! necessary products and those con- dent's proposal, it Is believed in.sumlug anthracite coal, gau, and mosi circles that the new offer does1 other fuels. not contemplate any advance in I The order which will bo adminis- wnges above the 14 per cent pre-1 tered through the Railroad Adminls- viously suggested by the government''ration, included curtailment of as a "basis for settlement of the i si reel n-iuing, lights and heat for strike. The principal feature In the: office buildings and current for proposal, it was believed, would pro- street railways, vide for the appointment of a com- mission by the president to investi- gate and report on what is con- sidered to be a just increase in tin- wages of the miners in view of the increased cost of living since the old scale was agreed upon. STORM WAKXIXCS AUK CONFERENCE OF 48 WAS UNABLE ID MEET ON By Atyocmu-d Press WASHINGTON. Dec. wesi warnings were ordered displayed today on the Gulf coast from Cedur Keys. Fla.. to Bay St. Louis, Miss. Winds will shift to northwest ipnigiit and increase to gale force with much colder weather. WEATHER FORECAST Fnir tonight and colder in ex- treme southeastern portion. Temper- ature degrees below zero in north.i and zero to_ S degrees above in south; portion. Wednesday fair and rising, temperature. By the Associated PK-SS ST. LOUIS, Mo., Doc. conference of liberals, known as the committee of 48. was unable to open its first national convention here on schedule time today because it had no meeting place as the re- sult of charges of alleged disloyalty brought against it by the American Legion. Whether the conference would be deferred wns a matier for conjecture. It was said that efforts would be made to hold a convention else- where in the event the management of the hotel where the conference was to be held remained firm in its refusals to countenance the' meet- ing. Delegates asserted the principle object of the conference was to for- mulate a program to solve the eco-! tivvnic and social problems confront- ing the country and- 10 improve the. inu rnatlonal relations of the Unit- ed States and to adopt a definite plan of political action to enforce the program. A Norwegian has patented -parkless radio device. To Hell With We Want Gas! Ada is foci up on promises. They won't lire a healer or save a freezing child. We have had promises from thi' first frost, down the line of Ihe thermometer to the zero point, and we find today that the promises of the- local gas company are not worth a tinker's damn. We are told that it is a matter of the pressure will be put on forthwith, and that we have ha.l the last of our gas troubles. But another blizzard brings another gas shortage, and it is the heathen's repe- tition- of the same old trouble. Zero weather and the lowest supply of the season places the market value of promises i'.xr below the zero mark of performance. If there is no gas in the local field, we are entitled to know it so that we can make other arrangements. If there is-an ample supply, we want to know in the Almighty's name why that supply is not turned loose. If the system is defective and the mains are rotten, the people have a right to know it. If the local management is working under the orders of its foreign president to hold the pressure down to a passing minimum, the people have a right to know that. No matter what the trouble is, the people have a 'right to have that trouble removed. If the trouble is beyond the power of correction, the people have a right to know the worst. But the people have had all the promises they want. The promises they have had are altogether without value. As the long suffering and extremely suffering public shiver about the tiny blue flame they want to know why former promises have not been kept. They want gas or they want to know why it cannot be sup- plied. CHILDREN, SANTA CLA US' LETTER BOX IS NO W OPEN- WRITE THE EVENING NEWS AND TELL YOUR WANTS TO OLD CHRIS CRINGLE sendin' word to Santy Claus to tell Urn A dishes confining! Please help me put It in the can't reach up, you Poor Sanity'd be so Vpolnted if he dWn't hear from me. .NATIONAL COJIMITTEE MEETING TXVKVFY TO TWENTY-FIVE CAB LEADERS FROM ALL OF COAL BEING PARTS INTERESTED IV .MIXED DAILY BY THE CANDIDATES. VOLUNTEERS By the Associated Press By the Associated Proas WASHINGTON. Dec. 9. With: McALESTERi Okla., Dec. i.-Coal most of the national leaders of the by voiunteer hegaa moving from the M-cAlister dietrjct republican party assembled here and others arriving on every train, Wash- today to the fuel sections of western Ington was alive today with gossip! lo Iuel over conditions and issues for the Oklahoma. Cars were sent to Clin- carapaign of 1920. ton- Woodward, Elk City, Hobart The gathering was incident'to the'and Alva. Tney were consigned to' meeting of the national committee! the county councils' of defense In which convenes tomorrow to .select' the countries in which those cities the time and place of the national convention next summer. The fight for the convention was between Chi- are located and will be sold at the prevailing market price. Twenty-five car loads of coal waa cago and St. Louis, but it attracted Pvpected to- be on the track only passing attention compared to this afternoon under way to the the activities of the friends of presi- dential possibilities and the confer- ences over questions of party policy. Friends of every republican prom- inently mentioned for the nomination wore busy, the managers of General i Leonard Wood and Frank 0. Low- den of Illinois being among tho first to get working organizations under way; Ohio sent a delegation to fur- ther the Interests of Senator Warren G. Harding of that state, and sup- porters of Senator. Poindexter of Washington and Hiram Johnson of California also were at work amon those who had gathered for the I meeting. It was regarded in many quarters as tjie formal launching of a boom fcr Senator" James E. Watson of Indiana, who was the subject of much talk among the committee and its guests. Senator Watson has announced he would not be a candidate for the presidency but would be in the race to succeed himself r.s senator. His friends assert, however, that (he a'd to the cemetery association in Indiana state convention will instruct '-he purchase of an additional five Its delegates for him and that an acre tract of land adjoining the active campaign in his hehaif will] east half of the cemetery on the healless portions of the state'. -------------K------------ C. of C. Board Meeting at the Harris Last Night The recently organized board of the Chamber of Commerce held its first regular meeting in the par- lors of the Harris Hotel last even- ing.4 All the officers were present and the r.ew president of the or- ganization, tfohn Smith, named the executive committee for the ensuing year and appointed a few other committees for special purposes. Probably the most important mat- ter disposed of was that of lendiug be made in many other states. Judge McKeown III With Typhoid In Washington south. The Chamber of Commerce will, through Its members as indi- viduals, sign a note for to purchase the land, and it is un- derstood that after the first of next July the excise board will make Ihe allowance for the amount in the j city's yearly budget and the same _ j will 'be paid. It was decided by the board'That the body would attempt to raiee I some money for next year's work by means of a big scream in the -way I of n home talent entertainment, to 1 be staged about the middle of Jan- j aary. A committee Avas appointed j to work out the plan and the de- will be announced at a later fdate. The board took the responsibility of hiving a water line to the dence at the fair grounds, now I ing occupied by Mr. Newton, pro- j prielor of (.he Honest Bill Shows land will also render him any other j assisiance within their power in j an effort to make him feeh at home at tiie same time take care of his show in good order. The board has plenty of v.-orfc and will no rioubt ;iu-c--; leg- ularlv onco a week hereafter. WILSON" THI-; MIVKRS TO Tom MrKeown. That Tom D. .Mc-i Known i.s il ai is information reiieiiiiiK his Ada friends, i It. is reported that he is suffering! from typhoid loiiowiug ;.u attack 01'! malaria. Judge McKcown left Ada- only a short time since and at that time seemed to be in excellent health. It, is sincerely hoped by his thousands] of friends in Oklahoma that his ill- ness may IK- only a s'ight attack and that he may soon be well again. fi III BlIIIE, MONTANA By tho Assoeinted PI-CHR SPOKANE, Wash.. Dec. ing cold and no fuel was ihe situa- tion reported in dozens of north- western communities early today while many others reported wood the only fuel available. The most suffering was reported trom Montana, where fuel ad- ministrator Mclntosh told a citizens' meeting that "hundreds are in dis- tress. Women and children are suf- fering from hunger uuo. cold. Butte has 'been burning old frame houses, the relics of it's early days, and while it was reported 10 days ago that all these had gone, an urg- ent appeal was sent out last night that others which could be spared bo demolished. The teoaperature at Butte-last night was 30 degrees be- low zero. J. R, Forest returned to his home in Stratford today after visiting friendg in the city. J iho Associ.-itcd Press WASHINGTON7, Dec. 9. Secre- tary of Labor Wilson today sent a telegram to John L. Lewis, ac'.ing president of the United Mine Work- ers of America, urging the miners to accept President Wilson'b pro- posal for settlement of the strike. The miners' representatives are to act the proposal this afternoon at Indianapolis. "The Secretary Wil- son said, "has pointed a way out with honor to the government, and honor to yourselves." BIG COAL GOXFEBENCE CALLED FOR TOMORROW tho Ansocmtcd Frau FORT SMITH, Ark., Dec. conference of all mine operators of district 21 comprising the states of Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas has heen called. for Kansas City tomor- row, It was learned in mining cir- cles today. COLD WAVE LMVEDKS VOLUNTEER MIXING By the Awociated Praia PITTSBURG, Kan., Dec. thermometer registered 6 degrees below zero at 8 o'clock ihis morn- ing. Operation of the Kansas strip pits by volunteer coal miners will be seriously handicapped if the worle- ers are able to labor at all today. DAYS _J TO SHOP   

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