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Ada Evening News: Saturday, December 6, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - December 6, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 Opening Next Monday and Changing Program Each Day Cornea “ Heart Breaking Baby    the    Liberty    Theater  WXie !H$ia Cbcmntt  ('LI ME XVL NUMBER 228  HESSEE MUSI SITUATION HH OE  ADA, OKLAHOMA, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1919  Burning the Bridge Behind Him  THREE CENTS THE COPY  J  \ { I j  I i  GOVERNOR nonplus DKMKS SECRETARY LANSING SAID (K>V-THE RIGHT OF ROTH ORBK-    Bl I.NM HNT HAD NO FART IX  A Ti HIS AXD MIX KRS TO    SM    TRI    KG RBL KASE OF  REMAIN IDLE    JENKINS  By the Associated l“re*s    By the Associated Presa  KNOXVILLE. Tenn.. Dec    6.—    WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—The  Notice was served on miners and American government has not operators here today by Governor changed its attitude on the Jen-Koberts that all resources of the kins case and had no part in ob-state in men and mo ne) would be taming the consular agent’s re-1 used to produce coal unless the lease on bail. Secretary Lansing de-! strike was ended speedily.    dared    today    in denying rumors that    I  • The owner of a coal mine has the state department had unoffici-not the right to use his property ally passed the word to the embas-j or decline to use it to the detriment sy of Mexico city to see that the* and injury of tin* public.' the Gov- consular agent was liberated on! ernor said. and. “on the other hand. bond.  the moral right et the men to strike Officials here refused to com-J is not in any way an absolute one”, meat on reports that J. Walter!  Governor Roberts warned the op- Hasen who furnished the $500 bond { era’ors that they must either mine was acting for Lewis Carera. Min-j coal or exhaust every effort to do ister of Finance in Carranza’s cab-1 so. “ or be prepared to answer to met. They are awaiting reports on the state for failure to do so this from the American embassy) through its courts, or military pow- at Mexico City.  ers as the state may elect.”    The    state    department,    it was said,  A number of miners and opera- his not yet been advised officially! tors were in the audience which that Jenkins was released on bail. heard Gov. Robert address. He it rt^ceived word here today that was accompanied to Knoxville bv at- Jenkins himself did not know until torney General Thompson and Ad- after he was liberated th* bond  infant General Sweeney.  MISAS GETTING COAT BT VOLUNTEER PIAN  was fin Dished and that he is contin'tm: »r investigation on his own account to determine who was responsible for his liberation.  DOCTOR DERCUM SAYS MR. WILSON IS STILL BETTER  Mil KHIEU  SfiJT aCHIGAN i THIRTY VOLUNTEERS GET BUSY  SS     AND    MOBE ABE  reported  GHERING NUMBER j TO BE FORTHCOMING  OF HUNTERS.  AT ONCE  By th® Associated Press    I    ..     A ,    ,    ...    _  CALUMET. Mich., Dec. 6.—There Governor j’’ B A -RnVirtTn^ *2 were four fatalities in the upper j John A f WhUehurst chapman ^5 peninsula of Michigan during the, state council of defense, volun-deer hunting season, which ended  teer  “iners Today began removing Nov. 30. This toll is considered fight  coal from the stri P Pit mines six-  in view of the large number of deer hunters, estimated to be about twelve thousand.  It is believed that fully 8,000 hunters crossed the straits into the upper peninsula this year. Most of them came from the lower part of the state, although neighboring states were well represented. Weather conditions were ideal for hunting, and there was an unusually heavy slaughter of deer.  Sportsmen are already demanding a closed season on deer next year, believing this step to be necessary if the animals are to be saved from  miles south of McAlester.  With moving picture cameras clicking as he worked, Governor Robertson himself lifted the first shovel of coal from the pit. The governor wore tall rubber boots and an outfit of heavy wooles resembling an army fatigue uniform. He stood at work in the pit for several minutes, until he had shoveled out a goodly pile of eoai. Chairman Whitehurst, similarly attired also used a pick and shovel for a time.  Governor Robertson, Chairman Whitehurst, George Clark and War-  extermination. In some counties De- ! de ?  Swltzer of tbe state  penitentiary titions are being circluated for pre-  e out to the mines in a  mule-  -.....  K  cart driven by a negro convict. The  ‘’ix mile drive. The governor told the convict driver, who made a lengthy plea for pardon during tho six-mile drove. The governor told  sen tat ion to the state legislature and the state game commission, asking for a closed season until 1921.  The movement to prohibit deer hunting for a year or more was begun even before the opening of* be  convict to “write me a letter.* the season just closed.    j    —-  By the Att^fiatad Press    —_____  KANSAS CITY. Mo., Dec. 6 —  Kansas is getting coal in fairly ap- By th® A*ao<-i*t*d pre** preci&tive quantities through vol-    WASHINGTON. Dec. 6.—Dr.    F. X.  unteer plans today; Missouri hopes Dercuni, the Philadelphia neurolo-to be going by night; Oklahoma gist. made his weekly visit to Che where martial law has been estab- White House today. He said he lshed in coal producing counties, found President Wilson’s condition hopes to be in the busineaa*by Mon- good, but that he would not give out  Seed Situation Will Be Serious Next Season  Extreme Cruelty And Non-Support Alleged By Wife  Ada, Okla., 12-6-19  Carter vs. Carter is the style of a  The seed    situation should be    giv-     cas « filed in district court yesterday  en prompt consideration bv    all     a,tt ‘ inoon * wherein Mrs. Mary Carter  —wv ... — ~ .I i mm** -v»- - —. —------ .     formAI(D  -    ...    .    ,    seeks a divorce from her husband.  day and Arkansas reports indicated a statement as Senator Fall of New     rari ucrs in    this county. As    the    Ernest Carter. C. O. Barton is at  that probably it will have launched    *J exico »  wh o had conferred    with the    large per    cent of    cotton and con  its mining venture by early next    * rodent, had made that    for him.    has been    damaged    during    the unweek. In many localities concerted The president conducted    some of-     favorabl     weather    this fall    ”  efforts were made to secure supplies    “T* 1     “g? 1 "!    r T. I,^  torney for the plaintiff.  Missing Boys From Missouri Arrive in Ada  SECRECY HOVERS AROUND NOTE TO GERMAN GOV’T  BOOZE FLOWS FBEELY III ST. LOUIS ISOAY  .sheriff Duncan’s office had the Evening News print a lot of cards last night, asking for information concerning two boys from Mountain Grove. Missouri. They left Mountain ! Grove some time ago and were  By the Associated Press  PARIS, Dec. 6.—The htmost secrecy is being observed regarding the terms of the note which was unanimously adopted by the counsel this morning, but it can be said that  By the Associated Press  ST. LOUIS, Mo., Dec. 6.—All sorts of intoxicants were sold freely here today following the order of Federal Judge Farris yesterday, temporarily restraining the United States District  of cord wood and other fuel. San  of a foreign warrant and a bill to This condition exists over a large defendant three weeks, and that noisome  lo her petition plaintiff states driving across the country tn Roff ».   Sh f Tnir ma , nied to def * nda "tiTheir family at Mountain Grove hadl ^u 7 Cl08ed * ! April, 191a. that she lived with tailed to hear anything of them for    bote    re.  conf^ren^l l l ¥ firmly that the, attorney and the collector of intenral conference expects the discussion; revenue from interfering with the with Germany regarding the putting, sale of such beverages.   e  ! rea * y  into effect will be Thousands of gallons of whiskey ^    I and wine s were disposed of and it  recalls that to make the was a common sight to see persons  Antonio reported that Major Goner- £«!?!?    ° f     k* 6    P ? liCe     ? n     * ht *     part    of the 8tatea  *» d  all men who J    ..££ v ?    , been    born    to    lhe ! about  a1 Dickman had received orders from    the measure the president 1  used* an     have    good wel1 Dlatured  seed should    the ' marriage said'    defendant  a IuPfT™ for information.    The sheriff's  the war department to have soldier?    indelible pencil because of the diffl-     save     them for planting purposes, as    guilty of extreme    cruelty toward primed hi tend iii    °f inquiry  cut wood from the military reserva-    cult) of using the pen in a re-    they    will be in demand when pint-    Pontiff, and cursed    and abuse? her pother Dofnts^n    T'  U°n forests for army use if nee es- dining position. This was the first  if J  fl _ JLL    “     P     I    to her great mental humiliation; andtor? theytit   6ar 7*    time in the history of the nation  Kansas volunteers exeperted to that a document of this nature had be working in ter mines today. Un- not been signed with ink.  official reports were that when they    ---V—  quit work last night a total of twenty-one cars had b^pn taken out.  mg time comes.  J. B. HILL. County Agent.  failed to treat her should treat his wife.'  MAN WHO KILLED CZAR NICHOLAS IS PUT TO DEATH  Train Schedule Badly Crippled By Coal Shortage  L  .    .    .     the >'    could    get    the    cards into  That    i     n iSi I    the    two    boys dr °ve into  ,  r " at  defend- Ada. Their names are Lewis Foster ant failed to work to support plain- 1  and Chester Carroll  tiff. altho an able bodied man, and     —___ _  that plaintiff had to work to support 1     *  herself.  Wherefore, plaintiff ask’s a divorce and the restoration of her maiden name of Mary Johnson.  VV ..VU. .....TUi.llg DI lilt -  111 IOT I Irpo.v    .    --,     —       “    vv.au.wu    “‘(.Ul    IU    acc    yci SUUB  days and had become uneasy! uiotp'  rp i P!10      e     imme-    boarding    street    cars    with    large    urbin  them, writing to the local of-L Thl    i    Prison-1    jugs and bundles    of    quart    bottles.  Germ an v    it     b *f    Erecting'    Whiskey    wholesaled    at    from    $17 to  ToeoT failing wMnh    ,f rmi !l ,ce pro '     n a galIon ' Bottled    goods    at    aa  tocol failing which    action, the coun-    average of $10 a    quart.  sel declares it will    be compelled?    -----------  to adopt measures of coercion of a  By the A*x»euit«*ii I'r*->e  COPENHAGEN, Dec. 6.—The so- Effective at midnight viet authoritie.- in Russia have radical changes will be made iii the punished by death the individual schedule of passenger trains run-held immediately responsible for Bing thru Ada. Both the Frisco the execution of former Czar Nicho-  an d Katy are effected by the change las and his family at Yekaterinburg Altogether four trains in Jun€  vak troop- were approaching the night trains on the Frisco—the city where the Imperial personages southbound due at 11:49 p. rn. and were then being held prisoners, ac- *be northbound due at 4 a. rn. cording to a dispatch from Kovno "ill be discontinued. The Katy train today.    due here at 10:15 from Oklahoma  By the Aaeociated Pres*  PARIS, Dec. 6.— In a note draft-ed by the Supreme Council today. .mu av, .hat body demanded that Germany  A XIE Ii HAX LEGION TO  MEET MONDAY NIGHT  The American Legion will meet • n  regular meeting Monday evening a* 7:30 at the city hall. A. R.  OIL PRODUCERS ARE TO BE PROSECUTED  military nature.    I    THE    4RMY TANK  Owing to the importance of the ~    - -     Xi V VtV   note, Puestres, the general secretary of the peace conference, will hand it*  man mission.  personally to the head of the Ger-  1918, when the Czecho-Slo- off for the time being. Both Yhe  courR *  to mil,tary  measures  sign the protocol providing for the J Chandler, the delegate to the na carrying out of the peace terms, failing in which the allies it is set forth will be obliged to ha vt  re-  ’ioii.il convention will be ready to i! i a K r ais report. Plans for the  Whit Hyden Died Last Evening of  Gunshot Wounds     Michigan:   _____    In    Keeweenaw county, it is pro  j posed to use army tanks for packing  IN NEW SPHERE OF USEFULNESS  By- the Associated Press  HOUGHTON, Mich., Dec. 6.—Th© army tank which had a big share in revolutionizing methods of warfare during the late world conflict, is to find a new sphere of u?eful-ness in the snowy wastes of th* 1  far northern states, according to plans  by t ho Associated Press  WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—Prosecution of western oil producers for  alleged profiteering was ordered to-    ,    .      ,______  t*ay by Attorney General Palmer.! Whit Hyden,Who was shot yester  1  deep snow on the public bigben complaint filed by Senator Capper  dcy  morning bv E. \V. Ussaprv n.i  ways  during the long, hard .inter  Baron Yon Lesner’s communication which was received by Premier Clomenceau Thursday declared the Allies were misinformed regard-  ins their complaint that Germany u’Tio atte^  A message quo»«*s the Bolshevik  ( it . v  and the one arriving here at j forces*^rnGUed 10     °*     mi,ilary    1   newspaper, Pravda. of Moscow, as 5 a. in. will be eliminated from the  ___________ jail    pending     a     hearing,    a    E    J    •    m    .  Cation established  an  embargo ef-  char « e  of murder having been filed  a .. e  °A  u *  The tank - carryin g ita fi ctive Monday against the shinnied I against him this morning  authority for this statement. The schedule.  Pravda’s account states that M This change will leave only two  her under the treaty.  The text of Premier Clemenceau’g note to Von Leaner concerning the  MICKIE SAYS  Johantowoff, member of the soviet, trains a day on the Katy and makes excessive German has been condemned to death and Th** schedule about as bad as can;    which  executed for ordering the execut  ******************  *  *  *  *  ♦  *  *  ♦  ♦  ♦  ♦  *  ♦  ¥  *  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  TO THE PI RU*’:  Police court characters and others who become aggrieved by reason of any reflection that the publication of news items may seem to make upon them, are hereby notified that the editorial staff have set aside one hour each day to hear complaints against the paper.  Owing to the rush incident to the publication of a large daily paper such as the News, we are unable to give the time to these hearings until after the paper is on the streets in the afternoons.  For this reason we designate the hour of from four to five in the afternoon to hear complaints against this publication. This is the custom practiced in the offices of most of the large metropolitan papers of the country’ at the present time, and we trust -that it will meet with the approval of the public here. You will con-■erve our time and enable us to publish a still better paper if you will follow the rule.  nim Kiln mnra  un     M     cr, P-|fhe    formation    of    Imperial defense i   m,,l> an unaatl «factory *er-[, roops  wHh organizing security po- i  ‘ *e and emergency volunteers which I  taking off a number of switch engines on its Iii  *  v *re, leaving only one train each I |j c   ^ way on points below Ada. The (have been declared to be virtually  J ta lr i n ar „ff    °    I ^ Germany to restrict her forces  ¥  ¥  ¥  ¥  *  *  *  ¥  ¥  ¥  GOV. ROBERTSON WITNESS IN THE FEDERAL COURT I     until    the   strictly to the limits of the treaty.  The supreme council today took under consideration Germany’s ex- ? press desire that custom payments on goods entering Germany by land be made in gold as had already been done on goods sent by sea. The  ^ Br »b» Auoci.ted Pram  * KANSAS CITY, Mo.. Dec. 6 — ^ Governor Robertson of Oklahoma 4 was the first witness for the gov-  * eminent today in the trial of 28  * alleged members of the I. W. W. on  * trial before Judge John C. Pollock  * in federal court, Kansas City, Kane.  <'HJt'AGO PLANTS ARE  STILL SHUTTING DOWN  tag the Auori.ted Pram  CHICAGO, Dec. 6.—The shutting down of industrial plants Monday iii Chicago on account of coal shortage will put out of employment at least 200,000 men, it was estimated  * The eignature of Michael Sap! L oda ,J/     w “    . by   « IHT. one of the defendant, who lat-j®, gl    I!f l0 , n  h  a '     f “ el   ( ? lr  1  cctar   .  er  t„ ...j .    . ,    ." or me northwest, that the fuel ad-  *:« I. .aid to have become an offic-  luin i StratU) „  wou ld  K „ farther than  the schools in conserving coal to relieve the distress.  Funeral Announcement  Funeral sendees In honor of Whit  * ial in the organisation, was identi  * Tied by Gov. Robertson. The signa-*| lure was attached to a question&ire.  * Gov. Robertson was a member of  * the legal advisory board of Okla-  * boma at the time the .elective Ber-1    , nonor . or    wh 't  * vice act wa. in operation.     W *°. dl *.     U . ,t - eve P* n ».  wi "  *    ^    «*>e W4 at 3 o’clock Sunday after-  *    !    noon at Oak Avenue Baptist Church,  *    Musk is the chief and most valu- by the I. O. O. F. and the W. O. W ¥ able export of Tachineiklu, Szechuan. Odd Fellows and Woodmen are re^  ¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ ¥\    ™ eai tf    the    annual    I    quested to meet at the Hall at 1:30  destruction of !««.««* leer.    o’clock to prepare for the funeral  Ie through the deep snow f it. The tank, carrying its  gainst the shipment!  aKainst nfm  This morning    -    ow ii motive power, will do the vork  of tuei oil from the west to points*  The  funeral services of Mr. Hvden !i luch mor t  ra P idl >  a bd, because of east oi St. Louis and Chicago. This  wil1 be beld  at Oak Avenue Baptist* strength, much better than was j action, it was explained, was neces- Church tomorrow afternoon at 3  possible with thfc  rollers, the high-isary to conserve the small supplies °’ cl oek under the auspices of theist ^muiissiouers believe. of coal available for the territory Woodmen and Odd Fellows    I    trouble    in    getting    the    tanks  west of thp MiKsiaainni u»i..— ——■___ *    !    over the snow is anticipated and it  st of the Mississippi River and to compel the use of fuel oil instead wherever possible.  WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—Oil producers. Senator Capper, said. have increased their prices from $1 OO a barrel before the strike to nearly $4.50 a barrel. Declaring that scores of industrial plants in the west had converted their fuel equipment for oil consumption since the strike began, Senator Capper said the increases in oil prices had plac-jed a burden on them.  Senator Capper also asked the de-, partnient of Justice to investigate complaints that oil producers ‘“had got together on prices”, he skid the quotations made by the bigger concerns were practically on even terms  Memorial Service Tomorrow  William L. Byrd Camp of Confederate Veterans will hold a memorial service at the First Baptist Church at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in honor of the late Dr. D. M. Hailey of McAlester. A historical sketch of Dr. Hailey will he read by R. C. Roland and the memorial ser-uon will be delivered by Rev, C C. Morris. Singers from the other churches of the city are invited to assist in the ceremonies. Everyone is cordially invited to attend this service and do honor to one of Oklahoma’s greatest men.  is proposed to have them driven by Keneenaw county young men who were soldiers in tho tank service during the great w^ar anti who are, thermore, accustomed to the w’ayq and vagaries of the tanks in slimy mud and clay—not unlike, in the difficulties provided for locomotion, the snows of the north. Snow falls to a depth of several feet and The enrollment for the winter *  dri ** s ’. * n places> a  score or more  A OIC ENROLLMENT AT NORMAL SCHOOL  term at the Normal school was 267 at the close of business yesterday. This is just 18 per cent over the enrollment of like date last year. The number of young men entering is very gratifying to the management. In several cases, young men who are on the farm come in for the winter term taking double work in agriculture and courses in Eti^lish, penmanship, etc. The courses in agriculture are largely the attritive features. Furthi mation regarding the  feet in depth in the passes and along the trails of the cliffs and little mountains of Keweenaw.  The government, in turning army automobile equipment over to th© states that have road improvement programs, will give Michigan, it is said, several army tanks and caterpillar tractors and Revreenaw’s road commission will seek one.  WEATHER FORECAST  Th   ......  \ ___ii    circumstances of any solar  Cloudy tonight and Sunday. Cold- i°n     4      r  all ? 08t     exactly  ar tonight    I    *    of    6585,    days    and    8  *    hours,    or approximately is years.  CAN'T INCREASE PRICE  . TO RAISE MINERS* WAGES Furthermore, infor- I  By th « Associated Presa  .  t     Ig    the    courses in. WASHINGTON, Dec. 6.—Not on©  agriculture has been carried abroad  c *nt can be added to the price of  %  by the school and county fairs to coal to finance any increase in the a very large extent as the Normal!    °* owners, Fuel Administrator  has been quite active in this kind i Garfield declared today after reading of work. These young men are R ress d *«P a tches to the effect that very welcome indeed and the school ! X i  ov ® rn 9 r Co *  of 0hio had  Proposed  only hopes that it may he able to do some real effectivd^service for them It is Interesting, also, to note that 67 new student# enrolled this term —just 25 percent of the present enrollment.  Flint weapons used by the modern savage tribes in no way compare with the finely finished weapons  that miners and operators in that state compromise on the basis of a 25 per cent advance in pay for the men.  Dr. Garfield indicated that the government would have no objections if the increase could be given without advancing coal prices.   w »».« mc fmeiy nnisnea weapons and P ? rr0t  ^ ldca   x,rr$sjr - ——'ta: Saar*"=   

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