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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 28, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 28, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             A Star As Inscrutable As the Eyes of Buddha-As Deep fca As the Fathomless Sea-Nazimova in "The Red Today 27 ft THIS DISTRICT H6 RETURNS THREE CENTS THE COPY THrllMlOTKSTS AGAINST HUSH COST SRIZITKK tYi-Kl" OK LIVING AS rKONOUXC- PECT SOON. AMUUCA. By tho AssocintcJ Press WASHINGTON. Nov. of bituminous coal mines in cases where the owners do not show ti disposition to co-operate in increas- ing the production, and the use of troops to protect all miners who de- sire to work, has been decided upon, in an effort, to end the coal strike, it was stated officially to- The seizure of the mines by the government and the 1-t per cent wage advance ugreed upon by the cabinet will be put into immediate effect. It was agreed upon last Wednes- day, officials said, in order to meet the situation resulting from a re- fusal of the miners and operators, to" agree to the government wage increase proposal. Cabinet officers expected many mine owners to put into effect vol- untarily the 14 per cent wage in- crease. Whether the mines ol those refusing to do so would be seized immediately, was not made clear, but it was said ihat no general plan for government control would be made. Kuch individual case will be decided on its own merit. WASHINGTON. Nov. -Mines taken over by the government will be operated by the Fuel administra- tion. Inn dei.iils as to compensation for owners not disclosed. While varoiiis federiil agencies were pre- paring 10 carry out the govern- ment's Fuel Administra- tor Garfield reaffirmed in emphatic terms his position that "profiteer- inu on ihe pan of either labor or capital will not be tolerated." "The public cannot and will not be asked to bear the increased bur- den of hither prices for coal, nor the payment of a largo sum as increased wir-rcs to any special class of workers." he said. Says Germany Will Not Comply With Demand of Allies I IU ttw- Ajsocintctl i TOK10. Nov. against the High cost of living and demands for increased wages are as i emphatic in Japan as in other na- tions. The newspapers attack the Government charging it with maiii- mining a policy of procrastination !in dealing with these economic prob- lem-i. From lUl parts of the coun- 'try. from oftlces, factories and schools come urgent appeals for ad- vantages in wages to meet the .mount j i ing cost of everything- 'Japanese, laborers have started a; popular movement 10 secure a re-j i construction of the cabinet, believ- ing that a ministerial change is no-1 ceWiry to secure economic rotorms. The newspapers deal lengthily with vNit that seven laborers made to Miu-auis Okuma, the venerable forin- ;er premier. The delegates included ''two coolies, three printers, a fac- tory hand, and an ironsmith. all at- rred in homespun dress. Some inem- of the delegation attributed iheir economic distress to the lack of -overmueut action and denounc- ed 'the cabinet for alleged failure 10 halt the mounting costs. Martinis Okuma also nssoris that the difllciilites under which the na- tion is suffering nrc largely due to the fact tli.it ihe cabinei has taken no effective remedial steps. He says he fear- thai unless some important are undertaken there is dancer of a popular uprising. To this he adds a vehement denuncia- tion of the luxuries of the rich. The House of Peers has snggest- ed that steps should be taken to control the prices of the necessaries w AUNTIE, oo you KNW WHERE Trif m IP; iS  s causing grave concern ,o industrial leaders and Ankers j The extraordinary interest In Japan 'in labor congress at Washington. due to the- fear that an elRM-houi I iav for Japan would so reduce Ja-1 output and so increase the- POSI of production that Japan would] greater difficulty in with other nations in world com LADY ASTOR IS ELECTED TO THE ENG. PARLIAMENT icause scarcity coal southwest was in prospect be- of the extreme cold and the of fuel resulting from the Cattle on the western American railroads, connect Pauls Valley, the commer- ihe educational center of the uni- l lie euuvULiuuai cial center of Oklahoma, with Ada verse. He warmly praised the effect our educational system had on the recent war. He delivered a scathing, Hei IS CIDER H THAN'KSiitVtM! SKKV1CHS A SVCt-KSS The Thanksgiving service yrster- d-iv was a success. Considering the weather, a good audience was out to engage in offering thanks to tne Creator for his wonderful blessings. The chief feature was the sermon which was delivered by Rev. Morns of the First Baptist Church. It was a fine message- -helpful and inspir- ing He began by giving a bnel resume of the history of Thanks- giving. Then he noted a number of the blessings for which we ought to be crops, tree America personal salvation, etc. Ho said thai above all else the world needs Jesus Christ. Nearly one bil- lion people have never even heard his name. The church, must give Christ to the world. It is a day of large gifts. The churches are giving millions to the cause of Christ today. Thp need of 'he world is great- Armenia starving to death. Japan, China India, Africa. South America, need the gospel. We must Rive H to thorn. Those'who heard the message were deeply impressed with its truths. The offerings for local char- .ity amounted to twenty-three dolla.b. Hy tho rrcbH PLYMOUTH. Eng.. Nov. Aston American born wife of Gen.. was elected to the parliament, from 'the Seventh Section of.the Di-j vision of Plymouth In the election! of November 15. The result was au-j xf-ter a count of balances WASHINGTON. Nov. 2S. Though further investigation of tacts will be lhe American govern- ment has no intention of receding from its position in the Jwikins case, administration ofticiats coal s.trtKe. vu LUC recent ne clared today. The government, they. ranffes also were reported in danger, j aUach on bolshevism in general said, is prepared for the next j Wridenltion today was forecast the coal strike in particular. which may possibly take the formlonly ror the Panhandle region of ,made quite a hit with tne audience of an uliimatum to the Mexican; Texas In the western plains states by his and enthusiasm. trains were delayed and wire com- president Stewart In nis annual munication was crippled. Over the Lddress was very brief but very interior districts temperature poin.ted. He urged the teachers not from ten to 3S degrees below excited over the low salaries, they now receive. They will receive! more generous enumeration. (Continued on Page 5.) The Mexican reply to the Amen- can demand for the immediate re-; lease of Jenkins raises a new issue that the Amrican consular agent made contradictory statements to the trial judge and this phase, otti- cials said, must bv investigated. In- structions will gu I'orwaid to th.- embassy at Mexico City to investi- CIIKAT BlUTAIX WILL ASSIST TO.K .HJC.O-SLAVS By iho PrCM LONDON. Nov. Britain nan given the Jugo-Slavs assurance that the Asiatic question will be soon taken up by the Supreme coun- cil and that Great Britain's In- fluence will be used to secure a just and equitable settlement in ac- cord with the life and Interest of the juKO-SlavB, according to private dispatches. ALIJKHT THOMAS HEADS LBAOUB LABOR OFFICE By tho WASHINGTON. Nov. Thomas, the conservative labor lead- er of France, waa selected today by the governing body of the Inter- national Labor Conference as the first director general of the inter- national labor office under the league of nations. Arthur Fontaine, also of France, was selected as per- manent chairman of the governing body. Ily tin, TOI'EKA. Kan., Nov. federal authorities and courts a_re struggling with the problems of 5 mi cent beer, the pure food division ihI sfite department of health Is h.v ing a busy season cs.ablish.ng or illegality of rasliioned Kansas cider. Th s b, i season tho apple juice P o-luci is being a, W UuaniUteB-tht- uuesnon ot how it is supposed to contain an u still not be classed as contrabami.i is specially pertinent. The chemists both of the state laooi.i- toiv and the food laboratories at Kansas Agricultural and the University ot Ksins.ib 'where many samples of foods and beveargus are analyzed, are having rush season. The results of these analyses as indicated in -the late Issuo "f I lie Bulletin, official organ of the SI.UL hoalth department, show that SCOK.S 'of these samples contain us high as per cent alcohol. Any tiuant.ily; !or alcohol in cider is illegal, and; 'eider with C per cent alcohol is. I recognized as highly intoxicating.: '.Many of these samples are sent in. ,'by county attorneys and others who i express the opinion that the cider is, of too-ancient a vintage, and that the sale of H constitutes a violation ilfa the state prohibitory law. j For alcoholic.content, however, a patent medicine submitted by the 'attorney general's office outranks the cider samples. Its label sug- gested that it was "a digestive tonic" and it contained 18.Cl per1 cent of alcohol. The cider samples contained as high as eight per cent. The ceremony counting of the ballots the historic Plymouth guild hall at o'clock. Lady Astor's philan- .tropic endeavors here dn-ring   afternoon. The bird selected was just the, average sized turkey and was in the west window of the- store in. full view of all and an invitation! was extended to everyone to guess at its weight. Hundreds Of people took a chance and promptly at three o'clock the turkev was weighed and Mr. A. 3019 E. 8th Street, County Superintendent of Schools, was found to be the lucky contestant. The turkey weighed 14 Ibs. and, t-k ounces and was in splendid condition for the big roaster which it will doubtless land in. Mr Stanl'lcld to .be congratu- lated'upon iho splendid manner in which the contest was conducted. I Btttiilcy-Tyler. T J. Stanley and Miss Vasuia .Tyler of Atoka camo to Ada yester- iday afternoon and were united In i marriage by-Justice H. J. JBrown. Mr. Stanley has been In the army for two' years and only recently returned from overseas service. The kaiser is setting a good example In one respect at least. He Is sawing wood. The old cuss must have seen tho miners' strike com- Milburn News. st Hut ion." he said in a statement, made public here today. As ihP newly crowned head of tne Angplos family, the youth said he must first look to tho financial wel- fare, of his mother, sister and younger brother. Once he has ac- complished this, he said, he would go to Mexico to take up tho fight. father's death will solidify the cause for which he hi> said "I can state my conviction that' my father's friends will not remain inactive." li.v IV Associate! Tress NEW YORK, N. Y.. Nov. Mberl o Angeles, the 22-year-old of General FelipR Angeles who was executed by a Carranza firing, snnad at Chihuahua City last Tues-1 j, p. Loving, Sr., died at his home day hopes to take up the work in j in gherman. Tex., -last Tuesday after- wliich his rather of Mr Loving was familiarly lahlishing in Mexico "a democracy throughout Grayson county that will be. respected In its na- ag artd was. one of tional obligation and its own aiui most popular men that ever lived in that county. Mr. Loving was a native of Mis- souri, being born in 1S35, and had lived in Sherman since 1S52. He was- elected county treasurer of G-rayson couivty in 1859, serving till "iSGl when he resigned to enter the I Confederate army. He was again elected county treasurer in 1866 but was removed by the federal au- thorities as "an Impediment to re- construction." But in 1872 he was elected coun- __ ________. treasurer for the third time and i-rtlPF I'ATD served for ten years. He also served LCK OK STOLEN FUHTliln the Texas legislature, There are entered his Plea i many former citizens of Grayson or guilty in Justice Andersons court county living in Oklahoma who know "Uncle Jesse" Loving and who will regret to hear of his death. this morning to a petit larceny charge. He was arrested some time since on a charge of stealing a sack of flour from Stanfield's grocery A whore he had been employed as a D ANUNZIO AJMl) roustabout. He was fined by Ihe high court, the costs in the raising the total to ITALTAX SOCIALISTS TNITB WITH SOVIETS ROME Nov. directors of the socialist party today adopted a motion declaring that the "Social- ist victory at the general elections an act of complete solidarity I with the soviet republic of Russia, clearly expressing, to the Italian gov- ernment an order to recognize Rus- Let a Want It for you. Marriage Licenses. Sam Andrews, 21, Stonewall to Ella Calhoun, 19, Frisco. ITALIAN FLEET CO-OPERATING By tho Awociated Press General Felipe Angelea, who was executed by Carranza's firing squad early Wednesday morning, was class- ed, before the great war, as one ot the world's foremost artillerists. He had attained considerable fame, as an artillery commander in the Mexican army under the long re- gime of President Diaz and cast his fortune with Francisco I, Madero in the revolution by which Madero seiz- ed the Mexican presidency. Subse- quently General Angeles enlisted his skill'in support of the cause of Fran- cisco Villa against the'Carranza gov- ernment and was credited with plan- ning many of the battles Villa won. Both friends and ene-mies ot Gen- eral Angeles havg declared that he was an unselfish patriot and that his hope was to bring about peace in Mexico. He was successively student, in- structor and director of the Mexi- can Military College, Chaultepeo, and an author of several text books not. all of which dealt with military realtors. Graduating from ChapuUepec m 1892 he was assigned to the engi- neers but later to the artillery corps with rank of captain. In this latter branch he served as a member of several technical commissions, was sent to Europe to inspect artillery for the Mexican government and while there was graduated from the French artillery schools at Fountainbleau and Mailly. He wrote a text book embodying some of his observations in Europe and France decorated him with the Cross ot The Legion of Honor. was barred from return- ing 'to Mexico when Madero's revo- lution occurred but when Madero became provisional president Ange- les was recalled and placed in com- mand at ChapuUepec. In 1012 he was made a field commander, al- ready having been commander, al- ii general, and commanded troops In a campaign against the bandit Za- pata. In this service ne is said to have won the good will of the Mex- icans by his humanitarian policies. When Madero sacrificed his life as' a. penalty for his revolution, Angle- les was first imprisoned and then banished. He returned to lend his support to Villa's various campaigns and it is declared that when Villa followed his advice the bandit lead- er was victorious. After Villa's fa- mous raid upon Columbus, N6w Mexico, Angeles went to the United States and remained there for about two '.ears He returned to Mexico in November, 1918, expressing the hope that he might unite the scat- tered revolutionary factions into a compact unit and pacify that coun- try "-before it was called to ac- count." He accompanied Villa in the attack on Juarez, June 15, 19is. when American troops crossed tne Rio Grande and dispersed the rev- olutionists. After this incident he -ppealed to the United States mili- tary authorities in the name of the "Fellowship which exists among military men" to define the attitude of the United States toward Mexican revolutionists but the United States authorities 'but the United States with him on the ground that he d-ia not represent the Mexican gove-rn- evidence that General Angeles was prompted by desire to promote peace in Mexico it has been said that Villa's payroll which was among his papers taken in the attack on Juar- ez showed that while Villas broth- er Hipolito. was credited witn drawing Angeles' name was on the list at Angeles was born in the town of. Zacualtipan. in the state of Hldal- .'0 June 12, 1896. He was the son of a retired colonel who had serv- ed in the War of Intervention and against Maximilian when the effort was made to make that prince em- .perlor of Mexico. His wife and three sons lived in El Paso, Tex., during the time he was in the field witn Villa. By the Associated Prow PARIS, Nov. 27. AdmLrla Enrizo Millo, cojnmander of forces of occupation, the Italian _____ along the coast of the Adriatlce, is walking liandvln hand with Capt. Gabriello D'Anunzio, according to information received here all along.the Dalmatia coast, It is said that people believe the Italian fleet and the D'TnunzIo forces are co-operating for the pur- pose of occupying all of Dataabla. In circles here, It is felt that excitement among the w B. Ledford, 22, Stratford, to, it ia ,_ Probably sleet and snow tonight'May Slagle. 19, Stratford. i population, will result in a uprls- nnd Saturday with rising tempera-1 Jess Lee. 21, Stratford, to Blanch, wtn raake Serbian mobili- Wllllanis, 18, Stratford. zatlon absolutely neces-wry. Last night about 11 o'clock a crowd of friends gathered at tne home of Hobson Cloer and wife on 109 W 14th street for the purpose of serenading them. The was furnished by old tin pans and cans. Owing to the rather late hou- the callers found the couple on th? point ot retiring -but upon the ren ditlon of "music" upon above IB- stru'ments they arose, dressed and proceeded to entertain their vls.- Re-freshments consisting of cigar- for the wen and fruits and candle- tor the ladies were served after the guests departed to leave the newly-weds in peace.   

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