Wednesday, November 26, 1919

Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - November 26, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma laba totting VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 220 ADA, OKLAHOMA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1019 THREE CENTS THE COPY OKMULGEE FADS MFA VI HK THAN NKW LY FORMED LABOR PARTY LOCALE. BYT SPICED IS EX- JUST IXXMPLCTKD MARKS PE* TYD TO OVERCOME;    RADIC Al, DEMANDS IN REVENUE HOPED FOR.    THEIR    PLATFORM. The fleet football machine that By the AMomt«d Prca Charles Rayburn has built at the CHICAGO. Nov. 26—Leaders of Ada High School during the last the newly formed labor party of the three months will fire up tomorrow ignited states today began prepara-at noon and begin to function at t j 0n f or extending tile organisation 2:30 o’clock when a Uke machine from Okmulgee will steam against preparatory to the second national convention next summer to nomi tt. The Okmulgee machine is a bf t candidate® for president and heavier, but reports have it that* the steel in the local engine is a vice president. The convention adjourned last night after completing States bit better tempered and the various ____; connections are better welded. Then. ' v “«*«niMtion and adopting a plat-too. the local machine is able to set ° rm °f *birtT-two Planks. Amens into high gear without an, delay.    written into the platform at and it is reported that the engine    fi n a1    croci on were: from the oil city    is    subject    to    fro-    Abolition    of the I nited quem shifts from    low to high    and    senate. vice versa.    Repeal    of    the Espionage act    with Coach Rayburn    is    making    no    pre    abolition    of    conscription and    secret dictions about the outcome of the treaties and the establishment of game, but feels that his eleven war- free speech, prees and assemblages, riors are able to take care of the Nationalization of railroads, oth-heavier visiting gridsters. The Ok-ler national resources and all basic mulgee team was victor when the industries. Ada boyg went there some weeks Organization of a league of workup©, but this was before Rayburn’s erg of all nations with legislation proteges struck their stride. Mc- to protect the workers against for-Alester tied Okmulgee and Ada de- eign made goods until complete teated McAlester with comparative solidarity can be accomplished, ease. Okmulgee has lost only one    *__ game, that going to Muskogee. Mus- OAirrDVAD TOTI T kogee ic now fighting for the AXU/ v EiluIN VZ Iv VV ILL championship of the state. Oklahoma City being the other strong! contender. Judging from the interest mani fested in this game, there will be    ‘ one    of    the    largest crowds    presen*    OKLAHOMA CITY. Now 25.— I tomorrow that has ever matched a Although expressing hope that yes-) football game in this city. A few terdav’s conference in Washington! WHI go with the Normal to    Durant, might result in settlement of the but most of the football enthusiasts coal strike controversy. Governor will remain here for the Ada-Ok- Robertson declared yesterday that be mulgee scrap.    will resume operation of the mines    a    All?OI/v    a Tar    T    DP|A\T -------- 0n the prison farm at McAlester    AiHEilVli. AIM    LLlvlUIN NATIONAL COAL SITT A TIO N    Tuesday or Wednesday. HAS REACHED A CRISIS Convicts who were sent into these CHICAGO, Nov. 26. Progress to- mines more than a Week ago were, day    of    the    nation's strike,    the 2th    withdrawn upon representations from day,    brought no marked    improve-    offiicals of the mine workers* union ment in the situation at the mines, that the men would return to work Government efforts to bring about if the convicts were taken out and u    u?,i .„Ben the    miners    iha ptix^i «rithHmvn Thia ns twee H. Hagan, state commander V the chief attention.    their Bromise it was said by the SEND CONVICTS BACK TO MINI'S GENERAL FELIPE ANGELES WAS EXECUTED BY, A MEXICAN FIRING SQUAD EARLY TODAY. By the Associated Press EL PASO, Nov. 26.—Genera! Felipe Angeles, * Mexico military leader, and famed throughout the world as a military genius, was executed by a Carranza firming squad at Chihuahua City early today following his conviction, with two companions, charged with rebellion against the Mexican government, according to telegraphic reports from Chihuahua City this morning. General Angeles was sentenced to death by a court of four Carranza generals at 10:45 o’clock last night. He was immediately taken to the place of execution which was set C. OF C. KOLOS in ELECT OFFICERS FOR THE COM-ING YEAR AND DISCUSS FUTURE FOR THE DOUBLE A TOWN. That the Ada Chamber of Commerce is a live and enthusiastic body and awake to every interest of the town was thoroughly proven in the annual business meeting held last night in the district court room, when a goodly number of members were in attendance. It was decided that the board of directors should be * increased in number from nine to fifteen. The following board was elected for the ensuing year: Bart Smith, J. B. Hill, N. B. Haney, H. P. Sugg, J. E. Hickman, J. W. Coffman, S. M. Shaw, F. E. Bowman, B. Schienberg, J. M. Coleman, J. A. Smith, F. J. Mo tor 7:00 a. rn. today. This was the Farland, R. C. Roland, A. M. Gregg BEHIND RED CROSS CHRISTMAS SEALS Pavement Pickups OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 26 ‘'““f.    «ka t    ii inc tun? uhs "fir mKm oui »uu    ti an agreement    between the miners    the guards withdrawn. This was    .    . and operators    at Washington held    done, but the miners refused to keep    ?:     the u     Amerlcan Legion, predicts the chief attention    nrnnti,.    i»    w.*    k..    th*    -that    the    former    soldiers    in    the    great their promise, it was said by the    iw««y«    «Mu»e«w in me great The gradual decrease of fuel sup-    governor.    ‘war    from Oklahoma will be in the plies forced    additional shut downs    ’’Now I am going to send    the con- van    “°f that &reat host of men and of plants in the middle west and viets back into the mines and pro-i women our ®* a tc who will deem the south regional districts. Coal duce all the coal we can, even 00 Christmas greeting or gift cotn-committees requested all industries though the federal government Ptofe without a Red Cross Christ-which could do so without heavy comes along and takes it out of our Seal* financial loss to close down on this hands.” said the governor. Orders “I esteem it not only a duty blit evening until Monday morning. * accordingly have been transferred to a privilege to endorse on behalf of Products in    Virginia today are up    Fred Switzer, penitentiary    warden.(the    American Legion of Oklahoma. to standard    maintained since the    No word had been received up to the    Red Cross Christmas Seal Sale strike    went into affect.    last night from Fuel Administrator    in Oklahoma”,    Mr. Hagan says    in a  ---- Garfield, who was asked in a tele-    letter to the    Oklahoma Seal    Sale Dunagan-MrKiiight.    gram Saturday by Governor Robert-    Headquarters. Homer Dunagan of Stratford, who son and John A. Whitehurst to “When we recall that the death ruttily returned from service lion,; name a fuel administrator for Okla- rate in Oklahoma from tuberculo-the border, was here last week visit boma ing Mrs. Blackburn. sis has reached as high a mark as Mitt rue . \i K- . . when . he met Meanwhile additional reports piled 3 0 00 a year, and when we further Miss Gussie Mcknight, and Sunday    in from nearly    every section of the     reoo »»^ t lha . llintMv rents out of the two young people were united    slate reporting    shortages of coil     everv    ^ in marraige at the court house. They Antlers, in    Pushmataha county,    #    * left on the 3 o’clock Santa Fe for    reported that it    had been compelled    J®™ Stratford. After December 1st they* to close down its water plant and anip ou the scourge in the .tate. will leave for Colo:ado where they was left without water     can    re    '    grasp    the    vital    im- will make their home.    ______ portance of all our citizens joining r Mr dollar realized in Oklahoma this sale, will be spent to Dunnagan is a very estimable MHS. ZEISLER BRINGS    hands    in    order    to    bring to the sale young man. He was reared in Ada,    HER    OWN    PI%NO    Kceaf    success    to which it is en- but for the past few years he has    Fannie Boolmfield Zeigler,    the     liUed    1    am    confident    that    the resided in Stratford. Miss TdcKnight:    crest pianist, who will appear at    tonner    service    men    of    Oklahoma was a resiedni of Stratford, where the Normal auditorium Friday night, wi!1 be found wanting.” she has a host of friends. Their    brings her own piano with her.    She    - many friends wish them many years    also has h*»r official tuner with    her. of happiness. Pastors’ Alliance. Monday, Nov. 24. the Pastors’ Alliance was organized at the city hall. The following officers were elected. Rev. C. V. Dunn. Christian Church, .president; Rev. C and her private secretary The piano came by express and was shipped to Ada from San An-1 tonio, Texas. “Jake” Artist Fined—Appeals. Tuesday a search warrant was issued by the mayor to search the I Historical Society Will Preserve Real Old Moonshine Stills OKLAHOMA CITY,    Nov. 26.— C. Morris,    First.    premises    of    Arthur    High,    who    was     ! Survivors of the hilarious days when Baptist    Church,    vice president;    Rev.    suspected    of    having    illicit possession    I visitors made their    wills before A.    B.    Elliff.    Oak    Avenue flautist,    of intoxicating liquor.    \ spending a *night in    Sapulpa, and secretary-treasurer.    Upon    search    a    jug    of    Jamaica    when life was a riot of thrills will i *»«*t meeting will be held at the    Ginger was found..    be carried    back    to    the old days city hall, Tuesday. Dec. 2, at IO High was assessed    $24.75    by his 1 when they    visit    the    rooms    of    the A^ rn., at which time place and time    Honor, but not being satisfied    there-    Oklahoma Historical    society    in    the of future meetings will be settled.    with, appealed to the    county    cou.*t.    future The membership roll hi a. follow.:       A    panorama    of    the    relies of the C. V. Dunn, Christian; C. C. Morris, First Baptist; A. P. Elliff, Oak Avenue Baptist; S. B. Damron, Naza-ren«; R. C. Taylor, Methodist; Franklin Davis, Episcopal. THEATRE AMERIGAN THEATRE WILLIAM DUNCAN, in ashing Barriers The greatest out-door serial ever filmed PATEE NEWS Showing all the world’s latest news Kg V Comedy in Two Reels “THE STAR BOARDER” ' *n>» 'he number* to be, .tate’, ‘ wild life” la being Sited up f 1 '™    *    dermal    this    winter    in    Grouped around a worn bar will be I’ ln /’ Course. Get your sea- a cholee collection of moonshine .on ticket now at the Ada Mu.lc j 8 , m .. gambling and bootlegging deco.    I    l    f    «-lt    | ————————*—. .    ingenious    still is made from a copper wash boiler and copper tubing, operated on a gas range by an Oklahoma City bootlegger in his kitchen. The still was donated by G. E. Johnson, sheriff of Oklahoma county. Another type of still is much the shape of a wastebasket, the fire being built under It. A third type is made of two gallon cans connected with coils of copper tubing. A clever bootlegging device. ”11 fled” by legal authorities, is a false automobile neat. The copper tank h W twenty gallons of ”booxe” was realistically covered with leather, and located In the back of a Ford. ”Ch»t<'k-sLuck” or Klondike dice box, need tor large dice, resembles not bine fo much as a cylindrical souirrel cage. The wood Is weathered end the iron dull from usage and age. For literal realism the scene will need only a “bar-kcep” and a few actors. ff Dennis Davis went to Holdenville yesterday on business. a. # Get your ticket tor the Fine Arts Course at the Ada Music Co. 11-26-lt Miss Lee Jones left yesterday for Okmulgee after visiting Mrs. Joe Biles. Miss Anue Smith, Normal student,) left for her home in Wirt tor the holidays. Ruth Hale of the Normal returned to her home in Stonewall where) she will teach. A. W. Parker is home from St. Joe. Mo., to spend Thanksgiving! with his family. Mrs. C. C. Kerns and daughter.! Fiances, of Oklahoma City are visiting Mrs. Claude Logsdon. Mrs. Briffel of Steven-Wilson and daughter. Adda Roland, are spending Thanksgiving in Okmulgee. Miss Haxel Landan, Normal stu-j dent, left on the Katy last night ! for Lehigh to spend the holidays. Miss Bess Kelly, who is attending the Normal, left for Davis tbdayj on the 1:55 Frisco tor the holidays. F. A. Dunlap of the Harvey Ford* Agency left this afternoon for Chickasha to spend Thanksgiving with his: Two National Figures at the Normal Friday mother. The Misses Edith Clems, Cleo Sandusty and Edna Gill of the Normal returned to their homes in Morris for Thanksgiving. Both season and single concert tickets are now on sale at The Ada Music Company’s store in Harris Hotel Bldg.    11-26-lt Let every member of a team of the Seventy Five Million Campaign be present tonight at the First Baptist Church at 7:00 P. M. The ordinance of baptism will be administered tonight at First Baptist Church. Anyone contemplating being baptised come prepared. M. W. Barnard returned last night from Sulphur Springs. Texas, and while visiting there he ran gQross a brother of Mayor Kitchens in one of the hotels. Misses Gladys Rawls, Ruby Weat apd Laverne Brown left on the afternoon Frisco for Francis where they will attend a birthday dinner and dance in honor of Miss Jane Derrick. Mrs. Lillian Rantf and little granddaughter Helen Louise of Toledo, Ohio, la visiting with her son. Waker Rantf and family of 113 W. 13 and expect to be .here until after the Christmas Holidays. Mrs. Bd Brents and daughter Mrs. J. B. Darnell who la here from California visiting left tor Oklahoma City today to spend Thanksgiving with Mrs. A. K. Pitman. Dr. C. O. Bradford left today for Berkeley, Calif., where he expects to spend the winter, returning here for work In the spring term of the Normal. The Misses Esther LaMarr, Mildred York, Francis Campbell and Gaylen Oliphant, students of E. C. S. N.,. left for their homes In Okmulgee yesterday for the Thanksgiving holidays. The East Central Education Association meeting win he marked by the appearance at he Normal auditorium Friday night of two national figures. Governor Charles F. Brough of Arkansas, and Mrs. Fannie Bloo-field Zeigler will both be on the program. Governor Brough is one of the best entertainers in the country, aud will begin his address at 7:30, and Mrs. Zeisler’s program will be-gin at 8:30. it goes without saying that the aud.itorium will be packed to capacity on this occasion. U. S. WILL MAKE INVESTIGATION OF RED RIVER CASE WASHINGTON, D. C.. Nov. 23.— Frank Xebeker, assistant attorney general in charge of the public land division, asserted today that the shuting of the Red River from the Oklahoma side to the Texas side since 1819, when the boundary line was established, complicates the case in such a way that it will be necessary to send several experts to the scene to make a complete investiga? (ion. “We have concluded from the information that we have at present the government would not be justified in starting suits against the private claimants upon the land in place on the Texas side of the present river.” Nebeker said, when seen today by a correspondent. "The department of justice will make investigations in the immediate future tor the purpose of clearing up some points of doubt that remain after giving full consideration to the investigation thus far made. It has been determined that the government will appear in the case pending in the United States supreme court, which was filed by the state of Oklahoma against Texas, and will make its claim broad enough to include any lands that are now on the Texas side of the present river that were on the Oklahoma aide in 1819 when the boundary line was established.” Nebeker said that the department of justice had further determined that suits will be brought in behalf of the Indian allottees along the Oklahoma meander line of 1375 to protect their righto ss to any of the claims asserted on Undo that would belong to tl}e Indians under those allotments. ’The Investigations upon which the final determination will be made aa to the lands on the Texas side of the present river will be completed about the middle of December.” Nebeker said. Who Gets Che Turkey? The turkey given away at Stanfield's Grocery weighed 14 pounds and 2H ounces and as we go to press the lucky number has not been called. time be was shot, according to reports reaching bere. General Angeles waa entirely unmoved apparently as sentence was passed by the court. Throughout the trial the military leader, famous among military men as the man who brought the French 75 mili-meter gun to perfection and made It admittedly the best piece of artillery ordance in the world, had presented a smiling countenance to his accusers. The trial was the most sensational ever held in Chihuahua City where Angeles and his two companions were brought after their capture near Parral by state volunteer troops Nov. 19. SAPULPA MAN WILL OPPOSE TOM M’KEOWN SAPULPA, Nov. 25.—J. H. N. Cobb, secretary of the Commercial club here confirmed the report that he would oppose Congressman Tom D. McKeown, for representative from the fourth district at the next congressional election. The formal announcement will be made this week by Mr. Cobb. He has spent 16 years in this portion of Oklahoma, coming to Tulsa during territorial days, and to Sa- and Marvin Brown. From this number will be elected a president, vicepresident and treasurer. Also from this fifteen men will be selected an executive board of five men who will practically have charge of the business. The new board holds its first meeting at 4:30 today. A resolution was passed endorsing the work of the officers of the organization during the past year, and thanking them tor their faithful work in behalf of the city. County Commissioner J. I. Laughlin was present and extended the thanks of the board of commissioners tor the valuable assistance rendered by the Chamber of Commerce, its president and secretary. Mr. Laughlin stated that withisthe assistance of Secretary Walker the commissioners had been able to accomplish things that would have otherwise been wed nigh impossible. He believed that particularly in the matter of securing the convict camp tor road work in Pontotoc county Mr. Walker had rendered invaluable service. Mr. Gowing has served two years as president of the chamber and in spite of the fact that he is a very busy man in the .capacity of manager of the glass plant he has devoted much time to the promotion of the city’s interests. He has made many personal sacrifices tor the public weal. More than once he has visited distant towns and. cities in the interest of Ada, and all this pulps a year later. For some years he was a Methodist minister, and: without remuneration, when the war broke out w*as serv-, Taken all together, the president, ing as county commissioner and sec- i secretary and the board of dietary of the Commercial club, j rectors of this year have worked He was appointed secretary of the j wonderfully well and have met with Creek county draft board; county food administrator; secretary executive committee, Creek county gratifying success. The coming year holds promise of great things for the Chamber of council of defense; member of the Commerce. Enterprises of huge prostate speaker’s bureau during the portions are in prospect, and every Liberty Loan campaigns,^ and ap- man j n t he c ^y j s urged to get be^ pointed by Gov. R. L. Williams as hind the organization and put things special representative to visit Okla- OV er. It was especially urged by ev-homa soldiers in France, but on ac— ery man that spoke on the question count of so much war work at home. that we become alive to the import-could not go with the party. LACK OF FUEL TO CLOSE ZINC MINES ance of making as great an effor* as lies within our power to secur for Ada the big million dollar Methodist college which is soon to be located somewhere in this state. AWP AITT A UAM A     A spirit of P°° d fellowship per- UX v LIV UIVLAnUiu/1 vaded the meeting throughout and ______    every one seemed jubilent over the , I1AMT ... a a    prospects of what seems to be in miners in the lead and zinc field of ® tore for Ada dunn S the comin S northeastern Oklahoma will be Y ear *___ thrown out of work unless coal can be secured by the mills. A survey DRAY r ER MEETING AT THE of the field shows some of the larger    FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH mines already closed down because 1 Braver meeting will be conducted of the fuel shortage, viz: the Kelt- tonight at the First Christian ner. Black Hawk, Victory and Fed eral. Otis Everett, purchasing agent for the Eagle-Picher group of mines, the most important in the field, declared that their coal supply will not last more than 15 days. The Quapaw Gas company has notified some of the mines that the use of gas under boilers will no longer be permitted. Drastic conservation measures have been adopted by all mills while they witness the coal pile gradually disappearing. The operators have no assurance when more coal wilr be shipped. Church beginning at 7:30. We shall continue the study of the Book of Romans. The study will begin at the seventeenth verse of chapter one. All members of the church are invited to this meeting. THANKSGIVING SERVICES AT NAZARENE CHURCH We will have Thanksgiving ser vices at the Nazarene Church Thursday evening at 7 o’clock. We will have our district superintendent, Bro. B. H. Hayney, with us at that time.—s. B. Damron. “The Red Lantern” A drama of a thousand delights. THE STAR OF A THOUSAND MOODS “NAZIMOVA” AMERICAN THEATER THURSDAY AND FRIDAY Special Music