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Ada Evening News: Tuesday, November 25, 1919 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News (Newspaper) - November 25, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                                 The famous Saturday Evening Post Story “Loot* by Arthur Somers Roche in a Melodramatic Picturization at the American Today  Z\ie gfoa Cbening  VOLUME XVI NUMBER 219  ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1919  THREE CENTS THE COPY  THE CABIX HT EXPECTED AX AGREEMENT TODAY, KIT TWO HOCKS CONFERENCE DIDNT BRINO IT.  Ada Playhouses  AT THE AMERICAN.  The American is showing a picturization tonight of the famous detective story that was read and enjoyed by so many people when it was published in the Saturday Evening Poet. The story was written by Arthur Roche and his host of admirers will be glad the story has found its way to filmland.  AT THE LIBERTY.  Showing all this week at the Liberty can be seen the popular “French Frolics.” This is one of the cleanest, livest vaudeville shows that make* Prest-     rou te.    They    have an entire  ■ i( . st    aa  By th* AtwociaMd Pre**  WASHINGTON, Nov. 25. den* VV J Ison s cabinet expected to  C hange of program every day and reach a decision today on the con- these programs consist of good dane trovers}- between the bituminous | n) . popular and ragtime singing.) coal miners aud operators that  and a dandy  good black face and) would stud the miners back to     other     comedians.   W0 rk.    Together with this is the regular  Before entering the meeting At- >  eV ery day, splendid picture program torney General Palmer said (hat ii     CAn  allays be seen at the Lib*  the figures as to the operator's prof-  erty ajliV day   its given yesterday by Fortner Sec-    *    _I_  rotary of the Treasury McAdoo were  correct, it was not likely that Fuel    Agin J »Vl Pf C    111 bk  Administrator Garfield would permit    wa Cl Arf IC//id    villi/  an increased price for coal. Any’ wage advance it was indicated, would have to come out of the operators’ profits.  Dr. Garfield took to the cabinet meeting cost figures on bituminous  coal production. These figures were.    _  expected to furnish the basis for an  agreement in the cabinet as to the    The Lions Club    met in regular j  amount of the wage increase the luncheon and business session at the! operators would be called upon to Hat Tis Hotel from eleven to twelve; bear.    o’clock today. The club passed a res-1  Operators and miners spent two    elution by which    ii    agrees    to    co-op- j  hours in controversy today without    crate    with the Twentieth    Century  breaking the deadlock over the wage Club, at the request of Mrs. Tom I Question. Leaders on both sides said Hope, in Hie matter of bringing to'  and Chamber of Commerce Meet  the negotiations would not be continued until after the cabinet had acted.  LETTER RECEIVED  FROM FORMER STUDENT  the city this winter some extraordi-i nary entertainment talent, particulars of which are to be announced at a later date.  At about the same hour the officers of the Chamber of Commerce,  --were at luncheon and had as their  El    Centro.    California.    guest Rev. R. L. Morgan, of A rd- I  %    November    20.    1919.    more, Field Secretary of the Okla-  Dearest East Central:    homa Methodist Educational Com-  As you march    out    onto the field    mission. He is    making a prelimin-  to ficht for E.    C S. N and you    ary canvass of    the cities which are  get on your toes for    the “game of    bidding for the    million dollar Meth-i  the season.    just    remember    that    odist University, soon to be located.!  -the Durant    girl (my wife*     and  stated that the candidates to \  anu myself are    for    >ou ani. that     date  were Ada    Shawnee, Tulsa. Mc-1  we want to    you    come through     Ale6t#r<  Okmulgee. Sapulpa and Ok-,  My wife objects to   —  Uhoma Cit >  Ada  honored with  Pavement Pickups  Let a Want Ad sell it for yon.  Dennis Davis left for Centrahoma today on business.  E. T. Myers of Stonewall is in Ada today on business.  Mrs. Lee Jones of Okmulgee, visited Mrs. J. A. Biles of this city.  Born, to D. A. Blood and wife, of West 9th, a baby boy, November 24.  Turkey dinner Thanksgiving, 75 cents a plate.—Hobbs' Cafe. ll-24-3tl  JHI HHK  Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Phagan left on the Katy this morning after visiting Mrs. Brunner of Ada.  RECENT ELECTION SAID TO BE A SAFE VOUCHER FOR DISCONTENT AND EXCITEMENT.  By the Associated Press  ROME, Italy, Nov. 24.—Peter A. Jay, American charge of affairs had a long interview with Nitti today. Neither the premier nor the Ameri-Prvt. J. H Madden of Tulsa, left j can embassy would make a state-  --Hi  MEXICO FAILED IO SENATOR MOOING III A MOST COMPLETE REPLY IO LANSING RACE ESI PRESIDENT! POLITICAL MIXTURE  on the Katy this morning for Stonewall to visit Miss Opal Truitt.  .D Krieger is here visiting his wife for a few weeks aftfer having spent the last few months in New Mexico.  Mrs. J. L. Case went to Maud yesterday on the Katy for a visit and to attend an entertainment while there.  Fleet Cooper returned last night from Tulsa where he had been visiting and also securing a contract for Ford tractors.  Mrs. Randolph and Jack Davis, both of whom underwent an operation at the local hospital are doing very nicely.  Mrs. J. W. Brown and son, Willie, left for Dallas for a visit with her sons, Austin and Sanford Brown, who are employed with Sears, Roebuck & Co., there.  R. T. McKinney, recently dis-    _______  charged from Co. R 47th Infantry,!  of the 4th division, was up from! TULSA, Okla., Nov. 25.—Mem-Stonewall to take an examination., berg of the unionized Tulsa police He will be sent to a hospital soon. I force may be compelled to sur-  Miss Olive Casey, cousin of Dennis!™ 11 — ^     01 ;    ?‘ Ve    UP   Davis, has had a second attack of!     a . ccording    l „°     a     J e . tte X„ rc '  appendicitis but is reported better  ment relative to the subject discussed, but it was indicated that Mr. Jay received a favorable impression from the outline the premier gave him.    '  The election has proved a safety voucher for discontent and political excitement, and it now appears that the election urging an upheaval is now an insignificant minority of the nation. Socialists who at first were so overcome with joy over their victory that they were uncertain how to utilize their strength in the change, or listening to the advice of older and more moderate members of their party. It appears these older statesmen will succeed in moderating the situation so that no serious trouble will occur.  Tulsa Policemen May Be Forced to Surrender Union  my saying “we" because we both have broth-  the first visit by the secretary  CVS playing football. But nevcrthc-  He  , h “  n< J.  I,rop< * !i ' io " *° , of '* T  less when the Evening Astonisher  an '.    . ! p ot-s on behalf of the  WASHINGTON. Nov. 25. Friends By the Associated Presa  Secre- j of Senator Warren G. Harding of- PARIS, Nov. 25.—The    present  By the Associated Press      — i—i ■— v—•    as    Mi.—    mim    .    ,    .    ...    .    .    •'t%(    IN    AhHINtil    ON,    Nov.    _    «».—(teiic' i »  comes out with the story of the ”    ^    ®     al     V* hnt°     lary     loosing    went    into    the    cabinet    Ohio, after several days of confer- !  political campaign in France has  game, just bundle one up and send    caninus and bonus offered  tueetjn ^ today without a reply to; enc? with him and other republi- brought together on the same tick-   ,     ,_____  lk .    ,___the Aniercan note demanding the cans of prominence here, have form- els, candidates of the most diverg-  it to me.  I must have a Pesagi—so tell  lh « moral atmosphere, the location the book agents  'rom the «TandnoinT of health and  immediate  release of William O. ally announced that an active effort - ent political opinions, nobles and ple-‘ t v or     ^ranfui.uc    will    ..ii    Jenkins,    Amrican    consular    agent    at    would    be    made    to    obtain for him beians. tradesmen, wage earners and  Gobs O’ retards to my old home other natural advantages will  &11  Puebla/ and  school! Go for Durant’s goat.  CARLOS E. BRENTS.  be taken into consideration.  warning the Mexi- the republican nomination for pres- bourgeois members’of the French  can government that further moles- idem.  Notice of Intention to Fund.  to intently by all present.  State of Oklahoma.  Pontotoc County—ss.  I, the undersigned, of lawful age. being first duly sworn on oath, de pose and say; that the following is a true and complete copy of the Notice of Intention to Fund posted by  me in five public places in the town *    ■..  ..........  of Erunos Pontotoc County. OKU- OKLAHOMA CITY. Nov. 25-houtc. on th.- Sotb day of November.  0overno , Robert son will not fol  Rev Morgan addressed both bod- 1 v “ u     •    «■■«««    mrui.    •    Academy along with illiterate peas-  ie, jointly in the parlor* of the liar-, ! alio “ °, (  ,' be  “f*"/  wo “'f “I 10 "**    \'l     a     declaring    Ohio    re-    anta. All are united against the  fie    hic    rHiniirkg    limfonMi     ly affecl lhe  relations between the publicans would line up solidly for j Bolshevik peril or the extremists  ‘    ...i..    b... ..ii  _“    United States and Mexico.    Mr. Harding. Harry M. Daughtery, of the Socialist party.  Mexico's failure to make a prompt a member of theat/te executive com- One of the most striking inreply apparently has    created an un-    mittee, declared    the Ohio    senator    stances of reconciliation of political  favorable impression    in official cir-    had “practically    been forced into    enemies occurred in the Boreaux disoles and the cabinet wa* expected    the contest,”    trict. Captain Marcel Gounouilhou,  again to discuss the    whole Mexican) Senator Harding himself    had no    proprietor of the La Petite Gironde,  Wholesale Pardons Tabooed This Time, Says the Governor  situation.  KILLS FAMILY THEN  TAKES HIS OWN LIFE  today. Her father, F. N. Casey, of Shawnee, has been with her during her illness.  In connection with the nationwide campaign of the Episcopal church Mrs. T. B. Blake Jr., and Mrs. M. F. Manville will entertain the communicants and friends of the church at the home of the former Wednesday evening at 8. A cordial invitation is extended to these and all others interested in the work of this church. ll-25-2t  Mrs. Luther Harrison received a message this morning stating that her uncle, B. W. Mackey, has just died at his home in Holdenville. He will be buried at Holdenville tomorrow afternoon. Mr. Mackey was one of the leading citizens of Hughes county, having served for four years as county treasurer.  ceived by Attorney General Freeing from Mayor C. H. Hubbard of Tulsa.  Hubbard says the police force of Tulsa is unionized and affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, and declares the oath of members of the labor federation is “at right angles with the oath of these men as policemen.” Hubbard says the degree of loyalty expected and demanded from policemen can not be obtained while they are members of the union.  Hubbard asks Freeling for an opinion as to whether it is within his power as chief executive of the city of Tulsa to require members of his police force to surrender their union membership or give up their jobs.  Freeling said he would give his reply Monday.  JUNIORS, BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS  ALLIES ALONE CAN  PREVENT THIS WAR  1919.  Notice is hereby given that on the 8th day of December, 1919, at S o'clock A. M., or as soon thereafter a* a hearing may be had. the Town of Francis, Pontotoc county, of the State of Oklahoma, by its proper officers will proceed before the District Court of Pontotoc county, Oklahoma, to make a showing and offer proof and ask said Court to hear and determine the existence, character and amount of the legal outstanding judgment indebtedness of said Tow*n of Francis, and to sign the bonds to be issued in payment of same.  announcement to make, although it ;>jip irs on the same list with Paul was indicated by his    friends    that    de C&ssagnac.  he might issue a statement soon. Captain Gounouilhou is the grandly recently declared publicly lie was [  84>n () f the founder of the newspa-not    a candidate.    per. the first    great    republican news  paper to appear under the Empire What They AII    Say.    of Napoleon    111    and which con-  Ok bilio:. a City. Nov. 21,    1919.    ducted such    a    bitter campaign!  The different classes of the Normal have been playing a series of basket ball games to decide the championship for the fall term. Last Friday night the Seniors aud Sophomores combined forces and played the Juniors and Freshmen. The victory went to the Junior-Freshman team. The first and sec-  against the regime that it w*as sev  ond year classes met and the first  By the Associated Pre**  low th** custom of his predecessors’ ABERNATHY, Sas.. Nov. 25. Dein the executive office of issuing termiued apparently to wipe out the  large numbers o: paroles and par- entire family of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dear Editor    -------- ..... —............  dons to inmates of state prisons at Hanson, farmers living near here.    Heartiest congratulations on the oral time* suppressed and its editor     v \? s  . e * . nner * ° 11  Monday  Thanksgiving and Christmas time. J. R. Sullivan, an American, visit- tone. substance and v.ttor of e»i- arrested.    .Ce    „f    el™?.,Ta  ii was announced by Judge O. ll mg at the Hanson home, shot aud torials and leader frontispiece in Paul de Cassagnac is the son of .  h  * . * J* jj .    ,    t/me  Searcy, state pardon and parole of-1 killed Mr. and Mrs. Hanson, aer- your last issue. That’s the kind of the fiery Bonapartist deputy, who in- » t  the Vine of th Ti rut    th*  fleer.    iously wounded    the older Hanson {stuff ifs going »o take to rebuild carnied during the Third Republic  score  stood^-l in favor  S of the first  Ry the Associated Press  GENEVA. Switz., Nov. 25.—Telegrams received by the Serbian press at Berne from Belgrade. Vara and Spalato, convey the impression tha !  only prompt interference by th* allies can prevent war over th'* Adriatic situation, as the Jugo-Slav> are said to have lost patience ani to be ready to fight the Italians.  “If a man is entitled to clem- boy. lined up the three other Han-1 Anuric^ ency he should have it just as much j son ahildren apparently to kill them on the Fourth of July as any other! but then changed his mind and date,” said Judge Searcy in an-1 killed himself. The Hansons came nouncing the governor’s decis on. i here from Minneapolis.  “It is the policy of the governor”!    -----  he continued, “to give the closest RUMANIA GIVEN ANOTHER consideration to every appeal for    CHANTE TO SIGN TREATY  Sincerely HOY HOFFMAN.  DENVER HIGHJACK MAKES  night*/the victorious teams played |  By  A^i.ted     HArL TODAY   DENVER. Colo., Nov. 25.—Two masked men early this morning entered a gambling house here, lined up thirty players at the point of a gun and obtained $5,000.  MICKIE SAYS  All persons interested may be Cleniency and where the facts in the    --  case warrant it, clemency will be ex-! By tim Associated Pre**  present at the time said proof is made to remonstrate against the issuance of said bonds.  Dated thie 25th day of Novena ber, 1919.  * H. H. HUDSON.  President, Board of Trustees.  Attest: J. H. Vickrey, Town Clerk.  (Seal)  State of Oklahoma,  Pontotoc County—un.  I, the undersigned, of lawful age being first duly sworn on oath, depose and say; that the above and foregoing is a true and complete copy of the Notice of Intention to Fund, which I caused to be posted in five public places in the Town of Francis, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma, on the 25th day of November,  1919; that said notices were post-1 hr th* AMorwiad Pi  tended. The season of the year j PARIS, Nov. 25.—Rumania is to should not and will not have any be given another chance to sign effect on releasing inmates of the j the Austrian peace treaty. The penal institutions.”    !    eight days beginning November 27  It is considered probable, how- j have been named within which per-ever, that the governor may in a iod she must attach her signature, few instances issue leaves of at)- Permission to sign is also to be sence to a few to spend Christmas given Serbia. The surpreme council with relatives.  MILITARY GENIUS OF MEXICO MAY BE GOOT  made this decision today.  PLAN UNDER WAY TO DEFER  WAR INTEREST PAYMENT  ed lo the following places, to-wit: One at City Hall;  One at Front of Bank of Francis; One at Front of Francis National Bank;  One at Post Office;  One at City Garage.  And further affiant saith not.  J. H. VICKREY. ll-25-10td    Town    Clerk.  Enemy nations lost 190 of the STI submarines employed by them in the war. *  A hobby horse for Juvenile skaters la one of the latest inventions of toy land.  By t!«e Amu ic ;  attid Pre**  LONDON, Nov. 25.—A plan is under discussion by the British and i American governments under which i the payment of interest on advances I by Great Britain and the United States to the Allies in the course of  JUAREZ. Mea., Nov. 24 —General  th ®  war and  * l w     by   Filipe Angles, .military genius of i United State* to Great Britain would Mexico, today awaited the conclusion I  be  P° 8t boned for three years, it was of his trial at Chihuahua City before  an,, annced in thr house of commons a military court, the verdict of j  a " noun  1 ? ed ln th ®  hoU8e  <>* commons which may mean his execution. It. chancellor of the exchequer, probably will be several days before  the former comrade in arms of Pres-1 VOTE TO ^TINUR ^ ident Carranza learns of his fate, J    STEEL STRIKE  according to advices received here, i    .    . . . ~ "  Two of the three men    captured j By   with General Angeles already    have - YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio, Nov. 25.—  been put to derth    i The  national committee in    charge of  I the steel strike meeting at    Pittsburg  yesterday, voted unanimously to con-Mrs. Lano    will    serve a special    tinue the Brike, it was announced  Thanksgiving    dinner    for $1.00.    here today by S. T.    Hammermark,  Cheap, considering    the    high cost    secretary In charge    of local head-    Temperature below    freezing Wed  o living.    11-25-21    quarters.    nesday    and continued    cold.  the devotion of some of the French  year class The roal la in wag  nation to the Imperial cause.     done    in the second half when the   The former hostility of the Gou-|j uniors  determined not to be out-nouilhou and the Cassagnacs in; classed. The final score stood 13-141    9    1_    a  southwestern France attracted as, in favor of the  juniors, thus making! 10Q.CLQ S FlCLTRQt  much attention as a bloody family    k„h      —    *— .v.    sr  feud iu Kentucky. The heads of the families, met on the field of battle w hen fighting the Germans, were both wounded, decorated, became friends aud now have joined in the campaign against Bolshevism.  Captain Gounouilhou wounded at Verdun was placed in charge of the Bureau of Information for Foreign newspapermen at the war office and  1  is remembered for his unfailing courtesy and kindness to foreign scribes during the strenuous days of 1918.  Aliens Awaiting Deportation Trial Inaugurate Strike  S3h3s  WEATHER FORECAST,  Cloudy tonight with a cold wave.  By tho Associated Proas  NEW YORK, Nor. 25.—An antitrial strike called by 66 alleged radical aliens awaiting deportation hearings at Ellis Island still was In force this morning according to officials af the prison and It was impossible to predict when the trials could be resumed.  The etrikers sent to Byron Uhl, commissioner of Immigration, ah ultimatum saying that they would not answer to their names or attend trial until a ’wire screen |>ehlnd which they were compelled to stand while receiving visitors had been removed^  * That dollar Thanksgiving dinner at Mrs. Land's will be worth the  money.  them basket ball champions for the term. Each team threw one field goal that did not count. The players were: First Year—  Aurda Bray and Bertha Bray, forwards; Kathryn Stone (capt.) and Loreta Cowling, centers; Sammie Bentley and Thelma Mooney, guards.  Juniors — Lillian Thompson and Dorothy Wagoner, forwards; Estella Holland and Willie Cole, centers; Kora Ramp and Bernice Bradford (capt.) guards. Mrs. Wilson, referee.  erfobcemenTFdry  LAI Of TO LOCAL MER  By th* Associated Press  WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.—Enforcement of constitutional prohibition will be placed squarely up to state and municipal authorities and the federal government machinery will not intervene unless obvious Inefficiency on the part of looal officials makes push action necessary, the board of temperance of the Methodist Episcopal church was told here today by John F. Kramer, federal prohibition commissioner.  It was said to be Mr. Kramer's first pronouncement of policy since he assumed office a week ago.  Mrs. Land will serve a special Thanksgiving dinner for. $1.00. Cheap, considering the high cost  New York Cotton Futures.  Open    High    Low    Close  Dec.    __    37.15    37.60    37.05    37.43  Jan.    —    35.95    36.56    35.90    36.18  Mar.    __    34.25    34.60    34.03    34.25  New Orleans Cotton Futures. Open    High    Low Close  Dec.    __    38.00    38.50    37.95  Jan.    36.50    36.70    36.15  Mar.    __    34.75    35.15    34.50  38.29  36.55  34.81  Liverpool ___24.71  New Orleans - 38.75  New York 39.45  Dallas 40.70  Houston ____41.25  Galveston 41.25  Spot Cotton  Mids. Yest’d'y Sales  24.05    8,000  38.75    5,139  39.05    ____  40.35 10,616 41.00    1,306  40.75  liverpool Cotton Open  December__________23.61  January ___________23.20  March_____________22.10  Cotton Sepd Oil.  Open  December__________21.05  January  __________21.49  March_____________21.58  IOO  Close  23.61  23.32  22.22  Clo*"* 21.31 21.f 4 21.(5  Our phone number is 99. Whe t any market quotations are wantr  1  we will be pleased to have you call.  11-25-21 o’ living.  For That CHILLY Feeling Take Grove's Tasteless CHILL Ton! \ It Warms the Body by Purifyir : land Enriching the Blood. You c n soon feel Its Strengthening, Invig"-  11-25-21 ating Effect. Price 60c.  adv   

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