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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 21, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             SRTN1S DISTRICT VOLUME XVI. NUMBER 216 Cbenmg JJeto ADA, NOVEMBER 21, 1919 Conflicting Thoughts 6 RETURNS THREE CENTS THE COPY THK Ul> WAS UKTKD IX ST. LOVIS TODAY KY OKWKK OK r. s. POLLOCK. CARRY F1UHT TO XKW OONUKKSS WHKX IT COX- VBNHS IX PKOKM- BKU. By the Awocimnl ST. LOUIS, Nov. 21- tho AwocinWtl WASHINGTON. .ed! a temporary injunction against the district attorney and tho internal j revenue collector from enforcing the provisions of the war-time prohihi-1 tion enforcement act pending fur-i ther litigation. In effect Judge Pol-1 lock's decision sanctioned the lifting I of the lid on beer In St. Louis. The order is made operative at once. argumejits At the hearing of Judge Pollock made it clear that lie desired both sides to include in their briefs omy sucu arguments as Nov. Presl- ike up th in hif message to congress when it convenes in regular session Dec. 1 it was stated officially tochiy (it th. lYhite House. Until then he wll have nothing to say concerning th senate's action in rojc Before congress convenes, it wns said, administration senators will confer and it Is possible that the mild reservationists on the. Kepub- ill -N. llca.i side will participate with a view to working out an acceptable compromise on reservations. Kerardless of who is selected to to do with the constitutionality succeed the late Senator 7" democratic leader in tne of the i wiu no change in the The judge asked if the state o! in fight, it Missouri had ever questioned in waj. ,u House.. Prosi- oourt the right of congress to considers that Senator the war-tim; prohibition iaw. When j mu-hcook of tla, no such action -d ho tight administration forces. 21.- been taken he saia: "It is time for the states to wake up or congress may usurp all! PARIS. Nov. 21.- their privileges." formal discussions have been held the Gorman representatives j mw here in connection with the j unification by allies protocol must he s J--.UM h> .uar.n.eviu, fuinilmen, t the a As >e. ,h, Imans have not stated Nonmil School Tiu-Mlay. The Normal school will hold '.is classes Monday the 24th instant in order that the school iir.xy close Tuesday afternoon for the Thanks- civlns holidays- Fiftv-nine students have with-, will sign the docunu.u. drawn within the lust two weeks loj America., dolwii.on is iMChinc for the winter term.! without instructions a.-. HI .1- ew of hem w to school I ticipation In the peace conloronco u large Por cent following the.failure of tho e into rural schools Ho vui.ty the but He...) YAIKEES IB TO TnfE FOR MT5 TO <-FT A HEAI-j SULK TOP DICER" SAYS ROBERTSON. OKLAHOMA LI2ADKR OF THE VILMSTAS BROUGHT TO TK1A By tho Press -IT'S me to get a I famous among military men of the real shiny, silk-top world as an artillery expert, u new (Ketiy a, [scheduled to be tried by court mar- he sent out telegrams Ual in Chihuahua.Mexico today. UlllfelJ .JV...V to the aforesafd lot Texas, Allen of Kansas and The trial is considered by Hex can authorities as the most important held in ftha7 country during the them one and all to a four-cornered decade of revolution. LIICJi-1 UilC vw race, the loser to buy the other a silk hat, suitable for state oc- casions, in the coming sale of Red Cross Christmas seals which starts Dec '1st and closes Dec. 31. Governor Robertson's proposition is this: Oklahoma agrees to go over the top first and have the largest pro- portionate sale of Red Cross Christ- mas Seals when the sale closes. If not, then he is to buy the others a new silk hat. If Oklahoma wins. General Angeles, reputed inventor of the freeman seventy-five mill- meter gun, which is considered the most efficient piece of artillery ever developed, was captured by General Olivo, a Carranza leader, Wednes- day, last. Reports in circulation along the border today were to the effect that General Angefes would be accused of rebellion against his government, and that the death penalty would be .asked. General Angeles lived in El Paso while In state on a per capita basis. "Bets to be paid the first time one or the other meets." "I'm figuring on having three hats shortly after the first of the Governor Robertson said. shortly after sending out the chai-j lenges. "That is, if Mr. Hobby, Mr.! importune Allen and Mr. Broush are game; enough to accept the challenge. I ny Ne ican army officers he was held in high regard as n patriot and soldier. His family now is in New York City, where Mrs. Angeles, because of illness, was not informed of her husband's capture. Pstssed by Th this full three hundred und sixty-two, which is forty-nine shon_ of the enrollment I 10 1 HUL UH totals! Whin- attended the meeting of 'he Supreme Council today as represen- tative of the United States and the entire delegation is continuing its -so far as numbers are When it 1s remembered. rvr a very large per cent of these I ate. entered military service much more definitely that they did school; the LONDON. Nov. inabil- LJ iJ W itv of the representative of the Unit- ed States at Paris to deposit 1 res- enrollment shows up well. s; .r i s r ivrnnttn -i ro tilled will noi Miss Carney, Adviser of For the nrst time '.n the existence of the school, outside of the sum- powers are tiled, will the remaining allies ated powers frc By Afsoi'liiioJ Pnst WITH THK AMERICAN l.V GERMANY, Nov. 20.- -Plans wi-re ctiinploted recently by liead- cjuartL-i-s of the American forces in Gennuny for the lines of communi- cation find' direction Of supplies tor the American units which arc ex- pected to t'Oi-in a part of Hie AllU'd troops of occupation in upper Sil- esia during the plebiscite to be held there soon after the treaty ot pea.'.- goes into effect. It is possible that Danxig will be used as a sup- ply base for these troops which are expected to remain in Silesia tor months. Announcement was made some time ago that the Fifth and Fiftieth Infantry regiments, which were then 'stales, had been RO- in Silesia, going by FAILS TO ACIIKI-: TKXAS- OKLAHOMA BOl'XDAKY OON- left at a high rate of speed. left at a very high altitude, i; .n a hurry to get to the scene Oklahoma b.as been a prize winner in everything, and it's going to be a prlnze winner in the coming Red Cross Christmas Seal Sale." Anglo-French Kemly for Hun. By tho Awociatcd Prasa PARIS, Nov. Stephen Pichon, French foreign minister, and Sir Eyre Crowe, assistant under se.c- tin of n a nurry 10 set iu LHU banquet 'he enlisted the for foreign .affairs Great one of the airships now do- 1 Britain, last night exchanged rati- stunts at Ada and i fications of the treaty guaranteeing w thout helpful find popular this answer to numerous questions farther feature which is_also .ard.ng th, Ktu us of the FOR GREAT DRIVE 1 lly till' AsM'i'intitl rrvw j FORT WORTH, Texas, Nov. Oklahoma may ask the L'niied Stutes I Supreme Court to appoint a trustee I to take entire cha-ge of oil proper- It ies in the Hod liiver territory in- ivolved iu the dispute be- I twoen Oklahoma it ml Texas. This action was thought prooable Iv'ter the failure of the governors !aml other officials of the two states !lO reach an amicable auroemoi [conference yesit-rday. Both Uovonmi- Hobby and   s I that the winter I H wou d bo n taU will see sonu- detinue, tangible re-istime that .ill poss and constitutional prohibition, paas- bales of Sea Island, the ed over President Wilson's veto. census' bureau announced today. The act repealing the daylight savings law. also passed over the President's veto. Providing for return of telegraph, telephone and cable lines to private Oklahoma during the -period ginned bales. Bank Call Is- Issued. WASHINGTON, Nov. 21. The comptroller of the currency today issued a call for the condition of all national banks at the close of business November 17. sunn' her work. 'mice from The winter term will begin Do-; Or. Rrmlt'ixxl Lntve Absence. Dr. C. Bradford who is just finishing twenty-one consecutive ternn as teacher at the normal school has been wanted a leave of absence on full pay by the slat" boar! of education for the winter term, and will spend this time in California. Dr. Bradford has been troubled for sometime with an affection of the throat, and he feels that the spending of the winter on the Pa- cific Coast will be very helpful in eliminating his throat trouble-. Dr Bradford will spend the win- ter term in study at the University of C.-liiornia, doing special work in psychology. council today a.uroed upon Hie dai. .whi-n h; ir.-.uy The citv council played a double court, has givi-n nidus to 1 header yesterday afternoon i.nd Hangers and guards h. K d looked over the record of two do- River valley to s ncci--. i nnuPiitH to i ivspass.-rs irom was arraigned before disputed lands. Oklahoma" olllcers n charge of under-! have a will to serve lor an oil well '.______ ct al and; which tli-.- are guarding. pugilistic exhibition. H'l a An sell 't fur you THE Dan Rogers his honor on studying Jack pulling off a HAGUE, Nov. 20.--A of possible far-reaching feet on American trade reunions in Holland is in progress in the Am- -.iHTdam and Hottortlam municipal councils regarding the equality of: OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. con- rttiiti- Bank Commissioner Fred ef, -Dennis today issued a call for the condition of all state banks at the close of business November 17. of" drunkenness in prohibtion terri- lory and coiili-ihuied ?S.75 U) i lit' city finances. Tomorrow tho police judge will pass on two charges- Homer Carney for fighting and J. H. Nail for drunkenness. Mini1 Operators Issue ntinmtum. miCKIE SAYS Governor to Study Coal. By tho Prcm DES MOINES. lowu, Nov. p. m.) Governor L. Hy llio WITH THE AMERICAN 1-ORCKb ]N% GKUMANV. Oct. hu civilians it, the American uccu- ,ied aroii complaints, orlBmaimfc with the C.onuan mt-n, are .irit-i, ht'ard to thoorrect that the; Amer can soldiers are "spolllnK 'he Oei-; man girls by heaping luxuries upon by spending money lech.-; for presents, wines and gooii. By llw AnKodutod WASHINGTON. Nov. (2 p. coal mine opera- j tors served what was practically, an ultimatum on the coal mincj representatives here today, telling j them that yesterday's offer of 15' cents per ton with 20 per cent in- crease for day work, was the tit- Imnst thai could be given. The; miners went into conference tmme- diiilcly to consider the offer. Acting President Lewis, of ..the United Mine Workers, announced after the miners' conference had that the state Hike concerted action In an effort to have miners resume work. Not enough states had replied for Governor Harding to tell whether ho would call a conference of governors or not, he declared at noon. States from which he re- ceived replies were: Indiana, Illi- nois, Ohio, West Virginia, Ken- tucky, and Pennsylvania. Irregular load to chronic and a con- stipated the with fERBlNE a great bowel It pgmflos the sv.tem. vfali-4's the bloftd and puts the dlgesf organs vigorous Sold by Bbrt Smith. have nigiu with soldiers and niiuiv of the German men have openly asserted that the cuiis wore entirely loo considerate of tho German women and girls. j Cafes in Coblonz and other towns, in the'- wno hold by the United j States troops have been doing lately ximi again this afternoon having any definite response of the I proposal. POULTRY SHOW IS POSTPONED je from the army, steals twenty-two hundred, persons. Yot on Saturday afternoons and evenings, the crowd becomes so great, Germans and Americans all together, that on several occasions the military police had to be culled U, maintain order. definitely the scheduled Tho officers of the association an- nounce that they cannot find a build- ing Hi Ada in which to hold this show. As soon as arrangements can be made, a place will be selected and the time net. WJ.E NNVTWWVXS VSSUE, ftUKU. HM4O OVk OOOW M V InG QtiilltMo fu AllicI ICilll VlaiLUijj LU t LCI viu ublic that American wondered by whom and on what oc- publicans, but still remains i of poor quality andlcasjons the picturesque native dressiforeign relatonis committee. ___if ,.f Irilic OT-O worn now- treat.v. Thp Panama Generally fair tonight and coal shortage. urday; not much change in tem- peraturo. shoes, of which thousands of pairs have imported by the municipalities in an effort to break t ho high prices of the Dutch man- ufacturers. Tin1 possibility of an extraordi- nary iifter-thc-war trade plot was hinted at in :i meeting of the Rot- terdam council last night. Alder- i man Do Miranda said that shoes which Dutch dealers had dissected land derisively displayed in their windows to show their, poor quality not American shoes, but Ger- man "ersatz having been substituted by the dealers to con- the public shoes were of paper. The workmen's organization which .have been permitted to buy Ameri- ican shoes collectively in an effort (.o reduce the cost of living, re- port od them to be of excellent qual- The prices of imported shoes been fixed by the municipal- ities at an average of 11 1-2 flor- ins approximately 40 per cent, below (.he previously prevail- ing. prices of the same quality of Dutch shoes. The controversy is occupying more space in the press than any other subject concerning America since the seizure of the Dutch ships. STEElTMILLS IN NEED OF COAL Dy Uio Associated Proa YOTJNGSTOWN, Ohio, Nov. Steel mills of the Mahonlng Valley !aiid Shenango Valley, the second j largest steel producing region In Mil1 country, today faced the possi- jbility of closing down on account Xolace Itoyil Arch Masons. Ada Chapter. No. 26. R. A. M. will meet tonight at 7 o'clock in called convocation for the p of C. Sims, Sec'y. EDINBURGH, Nov. of American visitors to Scotland have operation. Continuing government control oi dyes to Jan. 15, next. Extension of the Lever food, and fuel control law to clothing ano I other necessaries and penalizing hoarding and profiteering. Granting permanent rank to Gen- eral Pershing. Providing for demobilizing the I army to a peace basis of approxl- mately men, pending per- j manent peace-time legislation. Authorizing completion of the government railroads in Alaska. Continuing war-time passport re- for the purpose strictions so as to prevent an influx of radical aliens. i Ten appropriation bills aggregat- ling about also were passed. They included i for the railroad administration. j for the army, I for the navy and a sundry- civil budget of The French treaty, providing for an American guarantee to assist France in the event of unprovoked German aggression, was submitted to the senate by the President July 29, after demands from THE SCDIC1 senate re- in the ity. of Scotland, kilts, are worn now- adays. Upon inquiry it is learned that apart from actual Highland gather- ings, where everyone is expected to "dress the there are only four classes of kilted folk accepted without comment In Scotland. In the north, the heads of clans ana septs, the includes Englishmen, Welshmen and anyone who owns land or uses land as a playground; In the south, the public piper, and all over Scotland, the soldier. As an evening dress it also tee. Another treaty, the Panama Canal settlement with-Colombia, proposing payment of by the Unit- ed States, also remains in commlt- e. Several Important legislative mea- sures went over for final action at the regular session. The oil, gas and phosphate land leasing bill was passed by both bodies and remains in conference, as does the Edge bill authorizing organization of corpor- ations to help finance Avmerican Let a Want 1.1 II for you. export trade. The railroad bill passed the SOldlei'. AS an evening uiyou it uiow Aiit; lamudu um JJASOCU LUO has a degree oC general and will be taken up with the (senate Interstate commerce commit- There is a good deal of talk in] tee's bill at the December session, congress about adjournment. In I The house also passed and sent to I tvlO bkwwub fact, there is a good deal of talk in congress about everything, but the people would like to see some of this translated into Dem- ocrat. Cushing News: We might view the fight on the peace treaty with more complacency were it not for the odor of limberger cheese sur- rounding It. Let a Want Ad get it for you. the senate bills providing for de velopment of water power project; for establishment of a federal budge- system and piovlding a permanent government shipping policy. After an extended tour through the western part of Oklahoma an Texas, John B. Somerset returned to his home at Neosho, Mo., morning. For the past three day; days he had been the guest of hb sister, Mrs. Joe Simmons.   

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