Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 20, 1919, Ada, Oklahoma                             (fening JJeto ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, RETURNS THREE CENTS THE COPY VOLUME XVI ZIP REPUBLICANS BLOCK PLANS TO MAKE PEA CEPERMANENl -_ i __ 14% TO SAVE THE WORLD j FROM SLAUGHTER IS UKAT- TEXT OK 1XMMJE ADJOURNS SINK 1MB. HESOLI-TION ORDERS FROM "HIGHER-UP" J WASHINGTON, Nov. The Lodge resolution to declare peace with Germany, which is By tiw AwodHtvd PI-CM concurrent measure, requir- WASHINGTON. Nov. nK aQ co approval of. after three attempts to ratify uie; but> according to general prac- peace treaty, the senate last night no action by the presi- laid it aside, ended the special ,.esoiution of sion and went home, April 6. 1S17, All compromise efforts to "ring i by rcasoll of acts commit- ratification failed, the three tel- by the then German lutions of ratification all going down i el.nment. a state of war ov overwhelming majorities. ,iocrared to exist between that republican leaders apparently des- ,-overnment and the United pah-ins; of bringing two-thirds of plates, and, the senate together for any sort -Whereas, the said acts ot ratification then put in a resolution 4, lho German government have to declare the war with Germany lmll. ceased; and. emi "Whereas, by an armistice Two' of the three ratification 4, signed November 11. votes were taken on the resolution 4. hostilities between Germany drafted by the republican majority.. aml associated powers containing reservations Presi- 4. terminated; and, dent Wilson had told democratic 4. by the terms of senators in a letter earlier in treaty of Versailles, Gcr- d-iy wcuUl mean nullification of 1110-4. niany is to be at peace with treaty. On each of the votes most 4. t'he nations engaged in war of the democratic supporters of the 4. against her whenever three treaiv voied asainsi ratification. 4. governments, designated there- Before the senate con- .5. jn. have ratified said treaty: firmed a number of nominations. 4. )unv iherefore, defe'nvd action next j. resolved by senate of John Ski-lion Williams house of representatives to 'he comptroller of the currency. 4. concurring! that the said state The first vote on the l.odne reso- War between Germany and Intion stood for to against. 4, I'nited States is hereby de- On ih.- second vote, taken after 4. ciared to be at an end." soveral hours of parliamentary 4. The resolution was referred 111 which the democrats to ini, committeo un foreign re- win over somt- 4. unions without eomm.eni. made' va.n efforts t of the republican group of mild 4, reservationists. 41 in the affirmative The third senators voted and 51 in the 4, 4. 4. 4. Killed quested and the vice president de- ,r.iln- ciared it adopted by acclamation. Senator h' tl, .hoy would if PEACE mn ASIDE FROM THIS THE SIXTY- SIXTH CONGRESS PROMOTED MANY ACTS OF VITAL IMPORTANCE. By tlic Press WASHINGTON, Nov. 20. While consideration ot the treaty of Ver j sallies was the outstanding event of line session of the 66th the first in six years in which republicans have controlled both work of considerable leg- islative importance was completed and many other measures prepared for disposal when the regular meet- ing bcsins Dec. 1. The session clos- ing today was an extraordinary one. It convened May 10th under a call cabled from Paris by President Wilson, primarily to consider the appropriation bill which failed at the session ending last March 4th. Among the principal legislative achievements were: Submission of the woman, suffrage j constitutional amendment to the states for ratification. The prohibition enforcement bill, FEDERAL FUEL ADMINISTRA- TOR GIVES WAGE CONFER- ENCE A TALK "STRAIGHT FROM SHOULDER." providing for the enforcement, of war-time prohibition, passed over President Wilson's veto. WASHINGTON, Nov. 19. committees of bituminous miners and operators in the central com- petitive district went into executive session today to negotiate ya wage contract after Federal Fuel Admin- istrator Garfield has urged upon them the necessity for adjusting their differences and producing the coal the country needs. Immediately after convening the operators and miners decided to continue their negotiations through a subcommittee of eight from each side. S. Will Have Coal.' Speaking with the authority of President Wilson's cabinet, Mr. Gar- field told representatives of the bitu- minous coal operators and miners that "the' people of the United States need, must have and will have coal" and as long as the gov- ernment stands they will not be prevented from getting U. by "any- thing the operators or miners may do." Dr. Garfield explained that his purpose was to furnish the confer- Wilson's veto. i ence with the data which he would The act repealing daylight savins jn determining what wage ad- law, also passed over President ___ tn HV rho Wilson's veto. Providing for return of telegraph, telephone and cable lines to private operation. Granting permanent rank to Gen- vances, if any, agreed to by operators and miners, could be borne properly by the public. "I represent the people of the United States in a different the secretary of labor." Dr. from Garfield said. "It is part of Mr. to declare a final vote'on'adjouruing sin, com-> up at the bi'gmn.ng ot Hie n- netv session and is expected to "''f 4' 9 another stubborn fight. The adminis- -v> OTHER MAN AT Tl'LSA HAVE A HAK1> TIME TltY- TO DIE. i JOPLIN IIAXKEK DIES AT 1 By tin- AMan'iii'.i-ii .1OPL1N. Nov. -.20. William B. sixty-seven-years old. widely- known capitali-M and banker, died ,-nddi nl> i" a notel al liOlila.. i-arly today according lo in-' 1 rormation by his son, U. Kane. Jr. Mr. Kane formerly was a railroad niiui of protniin'iKV. He was a di-- rector in banks in Oklahoma; and MisMHi'i ;in-1 ''ashler of the. First N'aiional at li-rville.; I X r HUT A.I XT Y PREVAILS MANY CAPITALS AS TO WHAT IMMEDIATE FU- TIRE MAY DEVELOP. oral Pershing. passed. Thev include tion. It is my sole function .to eat- to railroad administration. ercise those powers conferred on 000.000 for army, for the fuel administration; to the navy and a civil budge of Jan adequate supply of coal is turn- I ished the people of the United States and to see that in times of stress NARROW ESCAPE FROM such as we are still unhappily in SERIOUS ACCIDENT! the midst of. the prices asked and received for coal are not excessive. While Miss Brebble Ray and Mr. j Public Wont Be Robbed. Paul Young were driving to town "Wo all realize now that, in the last night, their lights went our. great coal industry the public is an I just as they ne.ired the bridge over: important partner. But t'he public 'a deep ravine, near the City Park has a paramount interest, 'on West Main street. "The people of the United States Mr. Young took the wrong turn will not consent to pay an excessive after he had almost crossed the p.-jce for coal. We are all agreed to bridge and was only saved from bo-j that, but the question now is "wha1 ing thrown off the bridge by an excessive Nor will IX suddenly stopping the car. The two public agree to go without this com- front wheels were spinning in mid- air off the bridge wilh only the I rear c-nd of the car which rested on modity. "The people of the United States need, .must have, and will have coal undi-rs ood o be Mo. 1U ban er concrcfs can do so by a re: tion not requiring the presid signature. enate but Lidjotirntxl with- 'I reason assigned by two men who; Resolutions "thanking Vice Presi- resorted to violent methods to end dent Marshall and president pro tein their lives ycsierday. j had bei-n prepared, bull F Walts. 25, who was aj the'aviation service over- M1CKIE SAYS (Continuod on Page Eight.) democratic senators that President Wilson may be asked during the, recess to feel out the other powers, as to their attitude on reservations, with the idea of bringing the treaty' to some sort of ratification after congress re-assembles. The second vote on the majority's ratification resolutions was made- possible by i he mild reaervationists. who voted with the democrats to1 get the measure before the sonatei and thus xive an opoprtuniiy for! any eleventh hour compromise prop- i, ARE. BADLY DEFEATED seas, drank some chloroform, a lit-; tie carbolic acid, some wood al-'. coliol and then turned on a gas jet in 'iis first, effort to die. He was nn-l successful. Finally gas fumes lie-1 .coniplished the purpose in a room at I the Eagle hotel, 115 1-2 East First j StlVi-t. "I've taken poison and I'm going lo die." shouted A. B. Patterson, i us he ran into the street from! the Pasadena hotel, 1H 1-2 East Fir1': street. Bystanders though! he i rear C'liii 01 ine car WHICH un need, .UIUSL neivr, u.uw jihe bridge to save them from being I and they will not be prevented by i precipitated into the deep ravine. I anything the operators and miners They both got out and left the may do unless the government J8 __.. car there overnight, after first put-, dissolved into a chaotic condition. .w.....- A (jn.g a danger signal. The only. "The people of the United States 'though not changing technically damage done to car was a sprung', willing to pay sufficient to main- UK status of relations between I wheel and side door, but both the I lajn American standards, but the i were verv thankful that, miocfinn is what, are American ihc snved what arms' StR 0000 RUJVrt ond vote was reached hours of sparring, the tually was unchanged. Treaty Thru Liiic h defeated goveriiinenL ttoops to- by' lured iind his of from were dr.vcu point of advantage Asl.le. Senator Underwood, democrat, Alabanui. a ui t e I shortly after midnight the govern- tnd i'or on without troops moved two 3-Inch when Senator Plttman, position of Nevada, sough, to get action on which H only were notified- and Patterson was hospital. Strychnine su by the prohibition cock ..Hail, Jamaica ginger, caused dOUth hospital doctors said. Patterson intc'ndtcl to leave a "llnul and before taking eration was She said that, shi only write her own name. Without hestllation he returned to'his room and took the strychnine and then drunk the "Jake." Ulman" Heatley of Francis, who ,if they naa oeen sineu iiuni the senate to l'le i have been a suddell and cer- .11 U'JHl pea'.--' ireuty at its special session death- I expected by administration officials I and diplomats to have an indirect re- I still of some importance on the stops .low being taken to restore the to a peace Oasis. One of tlic first consequences ac- cording to the view taken here Is likely to be the hastening of the j iK'Ho'tiations in Paris including pro- I niiKiUion of (he process which will restore full commercial and diplo- GAIES OF HELL For Uie second time within ._- month and for the second time malic relations between Germany 3ince gtatehood. the doors of the und the powers which have ratified C0unt.y jail stood wide open today. Paris dispatches have two prisoners were discharged p was waiting for the thjs morning the cells were left question standards. The people want the op- erators to have a just return, but' what is a just Dr. Garfield said he was not prepared to say wnat conditions could reasonably be made in the price of coal as all the necessary data was not in hand. One of the 'items not yet. determined, he earn. was that of the federal income taxes for 1918, which the operators have 'claimed should be, included in the 'cost of operation. "The government has disputed this. iho treaty. this step was waiting for the action of the senate but it is thought there will be no further delay now i for that reason. The new congress will meet on Dec. 1, but not even i hi) mos-t. ardent supporters of the u-eaty believe it would he possible 10 it up again al the outset of morning the cells were left vacant and the lonesomesr place in all Pontotoc county is the Hole) de Duncan. Prosperous times and high prices serve to limit litigation and curtail PRESIDENT APPOINTS NEW INDUSTRIAL CONFERENCE By I he Associated WASHINGTON, Nov. dent Wilson today appointed a new- industrial conference by calling an intercession here December 1. The conference will be composed of serve to limit nugauon aua curiu.ii conference win uc the jail house population. Everyone'seventeen men. including govern- inn husv in break into the bas- ment officials, business men. former ia LM wivwn ...w lesion The Christmas recess tile. Then the populace is getting expected to Intervene before I more familiar with Uie Jaw of the h -lesion -o. -d iVd his rulings would operate to lain the position by Senator Uodgo. business center of the It was a viva vocc vote that the I army guardH again ai rived at the treaty, after before the senate for] bridge. ,m legislative business, no call was re- H Is reported that a simlla up- manv weeks, was laid aside. On rising has occurred at Chita in the Senator Lodge's motion to take up'Trans-Batkal region. since he entered He WEATHER FORECAST pects to spend the winter in El Paso, Texas. Ulman Is remembered one of the live and popular students of the Normal before the west portion tonight and colder Frl- Partly cloudy tonight and Friday Hi nrihftble- rnin. Colder In north- in force and it is not believed this will -be disturbed. outbreak of the war. day. Mnrrlafie Licenses. S. E. Lamb, age 23 and Miss Sadie Conger, age 18, both of Ada. shot wounds in a riotious demon- stration which continued here all day today. Three police stations were set on fire by mobs which lib- erated prisoners and paraded the streets carrying wounded rioters. British troops restored order. cabinet members, and former gov- ernors of states and it will carry on the work undertaken by the National Industrial Conferenc- which recently pondered the ques- tion of collective bargaining. AUSTRIAN VIOLINIST CANCELS ENGAGEMENT By the Associated LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. the suggestion of Mayor George V. Smith, Fritz Kreisler, violinist, cancelled his contract fo an appearance at one of the opera houses tonight.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication